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Costa Rica y el Tratado Antártico

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This work presents the historic, geographic, scientific and political background that lead to the signing of the Antarctic Treaty (AT) in December 1959, and the later international conventions and protocol which made up the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS). As an investigation in international relations, both idealist and realist analyses are made on the historic, present and future importance of this international regime. The reason why Costa Rica is not part of the AT is found, and an analysis is made of the benefits for Costa Rica to join this treaty. As part of this work, political and scientific support was obtained to promote the adherence and to ensure an active participation of Costa Rica in antarctic research.
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