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Plant-Based Substitutes for Gelatin

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Abstract

Gelatin is one of the most widely used food ingredients. Its applications in food industries are very broad including enhancing the elasticity, consistency and stability of food products. Gelatin is also used as a stabilizer, particularly in dairy products and as a fat substitute that can be used to reduce the energy content of food without negative effects on the taste. Besides the food industry, gelatin is also useful in medicine, pharmaceutical and photographic industries. Gelatin is a valuable protein derived from animal byproducts obtained through partial hydrolysis of collagen originated from cartilages, bones, tendons and skins of animals. It is a translucent brittle solid substance, colourless or slightly yellow, nearly tasteless and odourless. Most commercial gelatin is currently sourced from beef bone, hide, pigskin and, more recently, pig bone. It was reported that 41% of the gelatin produced in the world is sourced from pig skin, 28.5% from bovine hides and 29.5% from bovine bones. This paper reviews the potential of plant-based products as halal substitutes for gelatin.
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Plant-Based Substitutes for Gelatin
Contemporary Management and Science Issues in the Halal Industry pp 319-322 | Cite
as
WidyaLestari (1)Email author (drwidya@iium.edu.my)
FitriOctavianti (2)
IrwandiJaswir (3)
RidarHendri (4)
1.Faculty of Dentistry, International Islamic University Malaysia, , Kuantan, Malaysia
2.Faculty of Dentistry, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia, , Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3.International Institute for Halal Research and Training (INHART), International
Islamic University Malaysia, , Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4.Faculty of Fisheries, Riau University, , Pekanbaru, Indonesia
Conference paper
First Online: 19 May 2019
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Abstract
Gelatin is one of the most widely used food ingredients. Its applications in food
industries are very broad including enhancing the elasticity, consistency and stability of
food products. Gelatin is also used as a stabilizer, particularly in dairy products and as a
fat substitute that can be used to reduce the energy content of food without negative
effects on the taste. Besides the food industry, gelatin is also useful in medicine,
pharmaceutical and photographic industries. Gelatin is a valuable protein derived from
animal byproducts obtained through partial hydrolysis of collagen originated from
cartilages, bones, tendons and skins of animals. It is a translucent brittle solid substance,
colourless or slightly yellow, nearly tasteless and odourless. Most commercial gelatin is
currently sourced from beef bone, hide, pigskin and, more recently, pig bone. It was
reported that 41% of the gelatin produced in the world is sourced from pig skin, 28.5%
from bovine hides and 29.5% from bovine bones. This paper reviews the potential of
plant-based products as halal substitutes for gelatin.
Keywords
Gelatin Halal Plant-based Substitutes
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About this paper
Cite this paper as:
Lestari W., Octavianti F., Jaswir I., Hendri R. (2019) Plant-Based Substitutes for Gelatin. In: Hassan F., Osman
I., Kassim E., Haris B., Hassan R. (eds) Contemporary Management and Science Issues in the Halal Industry.
Springer, Singapore. http://doi-org-443.webvpn.fjmu.edu.cn/10.1007/978-981-13-2677-6_26
First Online 19 May 2019
DOI http://doi-org-443.webvpn.fjmu.edu.cn/10.1007/978-981-13-2677-6_26
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... Moreover, gelatine, which is known in the food industry, mostly sourced from bovine or porcine. As reported, 41% of gelatine produced in the world made out of swine skin, 28.5% from bovine hides and 29.5% from bovine bones (Lestari et al., 2019). Due to the growing fret on the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) or mad cow disease, it has affected the gelatine market. ...
... The manufacturers have tweaked the market into porcine gelatine, which is a by-product from pork. Hence, it resulted in 90-95% of global gelatine production are sourced from non-halal sources (Lestari et al., 2019). Gelatine made of marine sources is halal and can substitute the animal-based gelatine. ...
... Gelatine made of marine sources is halal and can substitute the animal-based gelatine. However, the production of marine gelatine is minor (M a C Gómez-Guillén et al., 2002;Lestari et al., 2019). ...
... According to Jakhar et al. [36], gelatin can be found in the scale, connective tissue, bones, intestines of the animal, and the skin via a partial hydrolysis process which can produce high molecular weight gelatin biopolymer. On the other hand, plant-based gelatin or ''veggie gelatin" is a term coined by Lestari et al. [37] that pursues an alternative to animal-based gelatin such as Konjac (a gelatin used in Japanese cuisine) and Yam (as suggested by Lestari et al. [37]), capable of producing gelatin from plant hydrocolloids. This veggie gelatin may be derived from Agar, carrageenan, pectin, xanthan gum, modified corn starch and celluloid [37]. ...
... According to Jakhar et al. [36], gelatin can be found in the scale, connective tissue, bones, intestines of the animal, and the skin via a partial hydrolysis process which can produce high molecular weight gelatin biopolymer. On the other hand, plant-based gelatin or ''veggie gelatin" is a term coined by Lestari et al. [37] that pursues an alternative to animal-based gelatin such as Konjac (a gelatin used in Japanese cuisine) and Yam (as suggested by Lestari et al. [37]), capable of producing gelatin from plant hydrocolloids. This veggie gelatin may be derived from Agar, carrageenan, pectin, xanthan gum, modified corn starch and celluloid [37]. ...
... On the other hand, plant-based gelatin or ''veggie gelatin" is a term coined by Lestari et al. [37] that pursues an alternative to animal-based gelatin such as Konjac (a gelatin used in Japanese cuisine) and Yam (as suggested by Lestari et al. [37]), capable of producing gelatin from plant hydrocolloids. This veggie gelatin may be derived from Agar, carrageenan, pectin, xanthan gum, modified corn starch and celluloid [37]. Research done by Oladzadabbasabadi et al. [38] was the latest attempt to extract ''veggie gelatin" from sago starch combine with ĸ-carrageenan for the hard capsule industry. ...
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