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Und wieder siegt das Thema? Eine qualitative Studie zu Einflussfaktoren im Kontext der Nachrichtenrezeption auf Facebook.

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This volume offers insights into current research on the reception and effects of the digital revolution in public communication in the field of communication science. The contributions it contains deal with questions about the use of news on Facebook, the articulation of opinions on the public Net and the influencing of opinions on social media (e.g. by influencers). They document the current state of research and knowledge in this field, answer current open questions on an empirical basis and provide suggestions for future research. With contributions by Patrick Weber, Frank Mangold, Miriam Steiner, Melanie Magin, Birgit Stark, Pascal Jürgens, Anna Sophie Kümpel, Larissa Leonhard, Veronika Karnowski, Claudia Wilhelm, Ines Engelmann, Stefan Geiß, German Neubaum, Manuel Cargnino, Davina Berthelé, Priska Breves, Helene Schüler, Benedikt Spangardt, Kerstin Thummes

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Analysen des Strukturwandels von Öffentlichkeiten gehen üblicherweise von der technologisch-ökonomischen Struktur aus, sie konzentrieren sich auf die technischen Geräte und Infrastrukturen sowie die daraus sich ergebenden Veränderungen bis hin zu neu entstehenden Organisationen und Institutionen. Im Fokus stehen dann beispielsweise die digitale Netzstruktur und die Plattformbetreiber wie Facebook, Twitter und Youtube. Mit diesem Beitrag soll eine andere Perspektive eingenommen werden: Im Vordergrund der Beobachtung des Strukturwandels der Öffentlichkeiten stehen Themen.
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Advancing theory in media exposure and effects requires contending with an increasing level of complexity and contingency. Building on established theoretical concerns and the research possibilities enabled by large social datasets, we propose a framework for mapping information exposure of digitally situated individuals. We argue that from the perspective of an individual's personal communication network, comparable processes of "curation" are undertaken by a variety of actors-not only conventional newsmakers but also individual media users, social contacts, advertisers, and computer algorithms. Detecting the competition, intersection, and overlap of these flows is crucial to understanding media exposure and effects today. Our approach reframes research questions in debates such as polarization, selective and incidental exposure, participation, and conceptual orientations for computational approaches. © 2015 International Communication Association November 2015 10.1111/comt.12087 Original Article Original Articles
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Prior research has demonstrated a preference among partisans for like-minded news outlets, a key mechanism through which the media may be polarizing Americans. But in order for source reputations to cause widespread selective exposure, individuals must prioritize them above other competing attributes of news content. Evaluating the relative in-fluence of various contributors to media choice is therefore critical. This study pits two such factors, source reputation and topic relevance, against one another in conjoint survey experiments offering randomly paired news items to partisans. Making a news source's reputation politically unfriendly lowers the probability that an individual chooses an item, but this negative effect is often eclipsed by the positive effect of making a news topic relevant to the individual. In many popular modern news consumption environments, where consumers encounter a diverse mixture of sources and topics, the ability of source reputations to contribute to polarization via partisan selective exposure is limited. © 2016 by the Southern Political Science Association. All rights reserved.
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The media environment is changing. Today in the United States, the average viewer can choose from hundreds of channels, including several twenty-four hour news channels. News is on cell phones, on iPods, and online; it has become a ubiquitous and unavoidable reality in modern society. The purpose of this book is to examine systematically, how these differences in access and form of media affect political behaviour. Using experiments and new survey data, it shows how changes in the media environment reverberate through the political system, affecting news exposure, political learning, turnout, and voting behavior.
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The concerns about the consequences of mental problems related to use of social media among university students have recently raised consciousness about a relatively new phenomenon termed Fear of Missing Out (FoMO). Drawing on the self-determination theory and on the assumption that low levels of basic need satisfaction may relate to FoMO and social media engagement, the aim of the present research was to examine for the first time possible links between FoMO, social media engagement, and three motivational constructs: Intrinsic, extrinsic and amotivation for learning. Data were gathered from 296 undergraduate students by using the following scales: Social Media Engagement (SME), Fear of Missing Out (FoMOs) and Academic Motivation. The SME is a new scale, specifically designed for this study to measure the extent to which students used social media in the classroom. This scale includes three categories: Social engagement, news information engagement and commercial information engagement. Path analysis results indicated that the positive links between social media engagement and two motivational factors: Extrinsic and amotivation for learning are more likely to be mediated by FoMO. Interpretation of these results, their congruence within the context of the theoretical frameworks and practical implications are discussed.
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For more than a century, scholars have alluded to the notion of an “imagined audience”—a person's mental conceptualization of the people with whom he or she is communicating. The imagined audience has long guided our thoughts and actions during everyday writing and speaking. However, in today's world of social media where users must navigate through highly public spaces with potentially large and invisible audiences, scholars have begun to ask: Who do people envision as their public or audience as they perform in these spaces? This article contributes to the literature by providing a theoretical framework that broadly defines the construct; identifies its significance in contemporary society and the existing tensions between the imagined and actual audiences; and drawing on Giddens's concept of structuration, theorizes what influences variations in people's imagined audience compositions. It concludes with a research agenda highlighting essential areas of inquiry.
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The present study revisits the relationship between the civic duty to keep informed and news media use in the new media environment, then discovers that the civic duty to keep informed functions as an intervening variable between education and news media use. Of particular theoretical interest is that the civic duty to keep informed was found to be a consequence of education and a determinant of use of new news media, specifically cable news and national news on the Internet, news media that did not exist when the civic duty to keep informed was first measured using a Guttman scale more than twenty years ago. The civic duty to keep informed was also found to have the same strong monotonic relationship to traditional sources of news, newspapers, and network television, as was found in numerous settings more than twenty years ago. Moreover, one new relationship emerged here that was not found in earlier years, a clear relationship between a civic duty to keep informed and use of local TV news. The demographic patterns found in the new media environment among citizens in this southwestern metropolitan area—strong monotonic, or near monotonic, links between the civic duty to keep informed and education, income, and age—replicate the patterns found in earlier years. For education and income, the patterns are very similar. For age, the pattern is even stronger than in previous years.
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News value research has contributed a great deal to the understanding of news selection. For a long time scholars focused exclusively on news selection by the media. Yet, more recent approaches - inspired by cognitive psychology - have conceptionalized news factors as relevance indicators that not only serve as selection criteria in journalism, but also guide information processing by the audience. This article examines the theoretical and methodological developments in the German research tradition and discusses selected results for newspaper and television news. Its theoretical perspective focuses on the conceptionalization of news factors as either event characteristics or characteristics of the reality construction by journalists and recipients. This article explores how and why news factors affect media use and the retention of news items. Finally, this contribution's empirical perspective discusses various modifications of the assumed factors and presents methodological advancements in the measurement of news factors in selection processes.
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Why are certain pieces of online content more viral than others? This article takes a psychological approach to understanding diffusion. Using a unique dataset of all the New York Times articles published over a three month period, the authors examine the link between integral affect (i.e., the emotion evoked) and whether content is highly shared. Results suggest a strong relationship between emotion and virality, but indicate that this link is more complex than mere valence alone. Positive content is more viral (than negative content), as is content that inspires awe. But while sad content is less viral, anger or anxiety inducing articles are both more likely to make the paper’s most emailed list. These results hold controlling for how surprising, interesting, or practically useful content is (all of which are positively linked to virality), as well as external drivers of attention (e.g., how prominently articles were featured). The findings shed light on why people share online content, provide insight into how to design effective viral marketing campaigns, and underscore the importance of individual-level psychological processes in shaping collective outcomes.
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Mehr als 20 Jahre nach Erscheinen der beiden Grundlagenartikel zum DTA ergibt eine systematische Recherche der Fachliteratur, dass die Resonanz erstaunlich stark gewesen ist. Der DTA wurde in Lehrbüchern, Theorie- und Forschungsüberblicken beschrieben und diskutiert. Meist geschah dies als eher selbstverständliche Erwähnung, oft aber auch mit positiver oder negativer Wertung. Die hartnäckigsten Einwände, wie Überkomplexität und fehlende empirische Überprüfbarkeit, werden noch einmal aufgegriffen und entkräftet. Insgesamt zeigt sich, dass der DTA nicht nur theoretische Impulse setzte, sondern auch als forschungsleitendes Konzept zu neuen und originellen Erkenntnissen führte. More than 20 years after the two basic articles on the dynamic-transactional approach (DTA) appeared, a systematic look into the scholarly literature shows that the resonance to the approach was astonishingly strong. The DTA was described and discussed in textbooks and in overviews of theory and research. Mostly, this happened more in form of casual mentions, but often also along with positive or negative evaluations. This article takes up again, and refutes, the most resistant objections against DTA, such as overcomplexity and a lacking propensity for empirical testing. As a bottom line, it is shown that DTA not only gave new momentum to theory, but also led, as a concept for guiding research, to new and original insights.
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Learning is generally conceived as active and purposive behavior, involving motivation, practice, achievement. Here, the authors focus on “passive” learning, on what is “caught” rather than “taught,” and on the processes by which such learning may take place. Passive learning is typically effortless, responsive to animated stimuli, amenable to artificial aid to relaxation, and characterized by an absence of resistance to what is learned, thus opening up possibilities that, depending on one's point of view, one may welcome or deplore.
News comes across when I'm in a moment of leisure": Understanding the practices of incidental news consumption on social media
  • P J Boczkowski
  • E Mitchelstein
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Boczkowski, P. J., Mitchelstein, E., & Matassi, M. (2018). "News comes across when I'm in a moment of leisure": Understanding the practices of incidental news consumption on social media. New Media & Society. https://doi.org/10.1177/146144
Nachrichtennutzung online. Marktanalyse privater und öffentlich-rechtlicher
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Goldhammer, K., & Scholl, E. (2017). Nachrichtennutzung online. Marktanalyse privater und öffentlich-rechtlicher Informationsangebote im Internet. Media Perspektiven, (10), 486-492.
News use across social media platforms 2016. Pew Research Center
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Gottfried, J., & Shearer, J. (2016). News use across social media platforms 2016. Pew Research Center. Abgerufen von https://pewrsr.ch/2bvjver
Informational Utility". Der Einfluss der Selbstwirksamkeit auf die selektive Zuwendung zu Nachrichten
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Knobloch-Westerwick, S., Hastall, M. R., Grimmer, D., & Brück, J. (2005). "Informational Utility". Der Einfluss der Selbstwirksamkeit auf die selektive Zuwendung zu Nachrichten. Publizistik, 50(4), 462-474.
Friends that matter: How social influence affects selection in social media
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Was tun gegen "Fake News
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Müller, P., & Denner, N. (2017). Was tun gegen "Fake News"? Eine Analyse anhand der Entstehungsbedingungen und Wirkweisen gezielter Falschmeldungen im Internet (Gutachten im Auftrag der Friedrich-Naumann-Stiftung für die Freiheit). Abgerufen von https://www.freiheit.org/sites/default/files/uploads/2017/06/16/a4fake news.pdf
Qualitative Methoden in der Kommunikationswissenschaft. Ein Lehr-und Studienbuch (Vollständig überarbeitete, erweiterte und ergänzte Neuauflage
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Nawratil, U., & Schönhagen, P. (2009). Die qualitative Inhaltsanalyse: Rekonstruktion der Kommunikationswirklichkeit. In H. Wagner (Hrsg.), Qualitative Methoden in der Kommunikationswissenschaft. Ein Lehr-und Studienbuch (Vollständig überarbeitete, erweiterte und ergänzte Neuauflage, S. 333-346). Baden-Baden: Nomos.
Der dynamisch-transaktionale Ansatz II. Konsequenzen
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Schönbach, K., & Früh, W. (1984). Der dynamisch-transaktionale Ansatz II. Konsequenzen. Rundfunk und Fernsehen, 32(3), 314-329.
Nachrichtenkonsum im Netz steigt an -auch klassische Medien profitieren
  • B Van Eimeren
  • W Koch
van Eimeren, B., & Koch, W. (2016). Nachrichtenkonsum im Netz steigt an -auch klassische Medien profitieren. Media Perspektiven, (5), 277-285.