Conference Paper

Fully Integrated Tunable Wideband True Time Delay for Wireless Sensor Networks

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The ubiquity foreseen by the Internet-of-Things (IoT) and powered by the 5G advancements has motivated research on wireless solutions for critical applications, in particular, Industrial IoT (IIoT). Nevertheless, there is little or no research on a unified design methodology for IIoT that tackles the conflicting wireless system performances of Power, Latency, and Reliability (PLR). Obtaining such a framework is vital for empowering further development and fair comparison in future IIoT designs. Thereby, this paper presents a novel design methodology to tackle PLR trade-off in IIoT Wireless Systems (IIoT-WS). This new methodology uses a meet-in-the-middle system approach to design an entire PLR RF system, and a custom Multiple-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) to help decide the best design variables that are both resource-efficient and PLR-balanced for a given application. Finally, to quantify the methodology for critical wireless systems, a lab-demonstrator for automotive application is designed and its performance compared to other wireless systems standards.
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