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Theory to practice: Design thinking for organizational and community development.

Authors:
  • Urban Discovery Schools

Abstract

Design thinking (DT) can be considered a method, approach, or disposition towards problem solving, organizational development, and community building. The traditions of DT date to the 1950’s and originate from a variety of design sciences. In this UC San Diego, Design @ Large presentation, Dr. Loescher explores DT and how it can be utilized to transform organizations and communities. This includes an exploration of theory, situating DT within organizational philosophy, and how it is practically being used in the private and social sectors as a way of mobilizing transformational generative thinking. Key words: Design thinking, design sciences, organizational development, generative thinking
@Large
Theory to practice:
Shawn Thomas Loescher, Ed.D.
May 8, 2019 @ 1600h
Design thinking, for
organizational and
community development.
@Large
linkedin twitter
researchgate
www.sloescher.com
#designchallenge1
#design
#designchallenge1
#development
#designchallenge1
every system . . .
reflection on theory
10
reflection on theory
1020
reflection from practice
practice | beliefs | philosophy
drawing connections
culture as artifact
first assertion
Chronosystem
Macrosystem
Exosystem
Mesosystem
Microsystem
The
Individual
ecological system theory
practice philosophy
second assertion
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
example: theory to practice
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
example: theory to practice
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
example: theory to practice
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
example: theory to practice
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
example: theory to practice
#designchallenge2
philosophical alignment
creating a paradigm
#designchallenge2
#designchallenge2
Definitions: Crotty (1998) Model
Ontology:
Study of being.
Epistemology:
What is knowledge?
Theoretical Perspective:
Assumptions about reality.
Methodology:
How do we approach change.
Third Assertion: Design Thinking
Ontology:
Idealism
Epistemology:
Subjectivism
Theoretical Perspective:
Postmodernism
Methodology:
Design Thinking
#designchallenge2
idealism subjectivism -postmodernism
method disposition
empathetic
human-centric
ambiguity
reflexive
visualization
Discover
Create
Evaluate
Ideate
Connect
design thinking as away of being
in practice: a framework
Vision
Mission
Values
Guiding Principles
Approach
in practice: execution
theory to practice
framework to operationalization
Ecosystem
Design
Resource
Conditions
Systems
Dynamics
Innovation
& Growth
Community
Experience
in practice: operational
How we . . .
Treat people
Approach failure
Evaluate performance
Inspire growth
Demonstrate our values
Articulate results
in practice: culture
everysystem...
every system . . .
#designchallenge3
#designchallenge3
#designchallenge3
practice philosophy
Theory to practice:
Shawn Thomas Loescher, Ed.D.
May 8, 2019 @ 1600h
Design thinking, for
organizational and
community development.
@Large
Design thinking, for
organizational and
community development.
Theory to practice:
Shawn Thomas Loescher, Ed.D.
May 8, 2019 @ 1600h
@Large
linkedin twitter researchgate
www.sloescher.com
References:
Bronfenbrenner, U. (1977). Toward an experimental ecology of human
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Bronfenbrenner, U. (1994). Ecological models of human development. Readings
on the Development of Children, 2, 37-43.
Crotty, M. (1998)
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Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.
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A thousand plateaus: Capitalism and
schizophrenia
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Gutek, G. L. (2014).
Philosophical and ideological voices in education (2nd ed.)
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New York, NY: Pearson.
Kuhn, T. S. (2012).
The structure of scientific revolutions (4th ed.).
Chicago, IL: The
University of Chicago Press.
Loescher, S. T. (2013
). Environment of change: Identification of factors for a
teacher initiated move to Project Based Learning
. La Jolla, CA: National
University. doi: 10.13140/RG.2.2.26624.64006.
Loescher, S. T. (2018).
Hope as strategy: The effectiveness of an innovation of the
mind
. Tempe, AZ: Arizona State University.
Loescher S. T. (2019, February).
Policy to practice: Design thinking in K-12
education
. A policy brief session presented at the Center for Secondary School
Redesign annual meeting, San Diego, CA. doi:
10.13140/RG.2.2.36581.65769/1
Loescher, S. T., Morris, M., & Lerner, T. (2019, February).
An introduction to
Design Thinking: Implications and applications in K-12 educational
institutions.
A conference paper session presented at the Center for
Secondary School Redesign annual meeting, San Diego, CA.
Orthel, B. D. (2015). Implications of design thinking for teaching, learning, and
inquiry.
Journal of Interior Design, 40
(3), 1-20.
Razzouk, R., & Shute, V. (2012). What is design thinking and why is it
important?
Review of Educational Research, 82
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10.3102/0034654312457429
Rittel, H. W., & Webber, M. M. (1973). Dilemmas in a general theory of
planning.
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155-169.
Rogers, E. M. (2003).
Diffusion of innovations
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Scheer, A., Noweski, C., & Meinel, C. (2012). Transforming constructivist
learning into action: Design thinking in education.
Design and Technology
Education: An International Journal, 17
(3).
Scotland, J. (2012). Exploring the philosophical underpinnings of research:
Relating ontology and epistemology to the methodology and methods of the
scientific, interpretive, and critical research paradigms.
English Language
Teaching, 5
(9). doi: 10.5539/elt.v5n9p9
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Thesis
Full-text available
Students may be situated within complex systems that are nested within each other. This complexity may also envelop institutional structures that lead to the socio-economic reification of student post-secondary opportunities by obscuring positive goals. This may be confounded by community misunderstandings about the changed world that students are entering. These changes include social and economic factors that impact personal and economic freedoms, our ability to live at peace, and the continuing trend of students graduating high school underprepared. Building on previous cycles of action research, this multi-strand mixed-methods study examined the effects of the innovation of the I am College and Career Ready Student Support Program (iCCR). The innovation was collaboratively developed and implemented over a 16-week period using a participatory action research approach. The situated context of this study was a new high school in the urban center of San Diego, California. The innovation included a student program administered during an advisory period and a parent education program. Qualitative research used a critical ethnographic design that analyzed data from artifacts, journals, notes, and the interviews of students (n = 8), parents (n = 6), and teachers (n = 5). Quantitative research included the analysis of data from surveys administered to inform the development of the innovation (n = 112), to measure learning of parent workshop participants (n = 10), and to measure learning, hope, and attitudinal disposition of student participants (n = 49). Triangulation was used to answer the studies’ four research questions. Triangulated findings were subjected to the method of crystallization to search for hidden meanings and multiple truths. Findings included the importance of parent involvement, the influence of positive goals, relational implications of goal setting and pathway knowledge on agentic thinking, and that teacher implementation of the innovation may have influenced student hope levels. This study argued for a grounded theory situated within a theoretical framework based upon Snyder’s Hope Theory and Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System Theory. This argument asserted that influence on pathway and agency occurred at levels of high proximal process with the influence of goal setting occurring at levels of lower proximal process.
Article
Full-text available
In an ever changing society of the 21st century, there is a demand to equip students with meta competences going beyond cognitive knowledge. Education, therefore, needs a transition from transferring knowledge to developing individual potentials with the help of constructivist learning. Advantages of constructivist learning, and criteria for its realisation have been well-determined through theoretical findings in pedagogy (Reich 2008, de Corte, OECD 2010). However, the practical implementation leaves a lot to be desired (Gardner 2010, Wagner 2011). Knowledge acquisition is still fragmented into isolated subjects. Lesson layouts are not efficiently designed to help teachers execute a holistic and interdisciplinary learning. As is shown in this paper, teachers are having negative classroom experience with project work or interdisciplinary teaching, due to a constant feeling of uncertainty and chaos, as well as lack of a process to follow. We therefore conclude: there is a missing link between theoretical findings and demands by pedagogy science and its practical implementation. We claim that, Design Thinking as a team-based learning process offers teachers support towards practice-oriented and holistic modes of constructivist learning in projects. Our case study confirms an improvement of classroom experience for teacher and student alike when using Design Thinking. This leads to a positive attitude towards constructivist learning and an increase of its implementation in education. The ultimate goal of this paper is to prove that Design Thinking gets teachers empowered to facilitate constructivist learning in order to foster 21st century skills.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
What motivators and pedagogical values within the administration’s immediate control might encourage teachers to self-initiate a change in their instructional practice to Project-Based Learning (PBL)? This action research study examined why some teachers self-initiate a change to PBL.
Thesis
Full-text available
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Article
Full-text available
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Design thinking is generally defined as an analytic and creative process that engages a person in opportunities to experiment, create and prototype models, gather feedback, and redesign. Several characteristics (e.g., visualization, creativity) that a good design thinker should possess have been identified from the literature. The primary purpose of this article is to summarize and synthesize the research on design thinking to (a) better understand its characteristics and processes, as well as the differences between novice and expert design thinkers, and (b) apply the findings from the literature regarding the application of design thinking to our educational system. The authors’ overarching goal is to identify the features and characteristics of design thinking and discuss its importance in promoting students’ problem-solving skills in the 21st century.
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