Article

Do office workers adjust their chairs? End-user knowledge, use and barriers to chair adjustment

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Abstract

A quantitative field study measured end-user availability, knowledge and use levels of adjustable office chair functions in Korea-based office workers, together with their perceived barriers towards making adjustments. Fifty-one English-speaking workers were interviewed and surveyed in a related design. Results showed that of the number of adjustable functions available on their office chair (M=5.39, SD=2.3), participants knew fewer than half of them (M=2.51, SD=1.52) and used even less (M=1.86, SD=1.21). Fifty-three percent of participants knew two or less and 73% had used only two or less. Ten percent had used none. Results suggested physical needs (such as increased comfort or postural change) were a strong driver for previous chair adjustment behaviour. Perceived cognitive barriers played a more significant role in limiting chair adjustment knowledge and use than physical or organizational barriers. Highly adjustable office chairs have the possibility of satisfying the adjustment needs of most end-users. However, adjustable chair functions need to be both available and known in order to be used.

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... In accommodating larger populations, there is a tendency toward either stratified fixed designs, or adjustable designs (Underwood and Sims, 2019). On one side, even when adjustable designs are used, economic constraints from final production costs may jeopardize product viability. ...
... This trend was most evident with the height adjustable desk, providing nearly 99% match level for desk height. These results were expected, since a lack of desk adjustability will also reduce user accommodation percentage (Underwood and Sims, 2019). It was shown that a single design will not accommodate most users, and so configurations may either stratify for more than one desk height, or more simply incorporate adjustable desks or a footrest. ...
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Thesis
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The project conceived in 1929 by Gardner Murphy and the writer aimed first to present a wide array of problems having to do with five major "attitude areas"--international relations, race relations, economic conflict, political conflict, and religion. The kind of questionnaire material falls into four classes: yes-no, multiple choice, propositions to be responded to by degrees of approval, and a series of brief newspaper narratives to be approved or disapproved in various degrees. The monograph aims to describe a technique rather than to give results. The appendix, covering ten pages, shows the method of constructing an attitude scale. A bibliography is also given.
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A large-scale field intervention study was undertaken to examine the effects of office ergonomics training coupled with a highly adjustable chair on office workers' knowledge and musculoskeletal risks. Office workers were assigned to one of three study groups: a group receiving the training and adjustable chair (n=96), a training-only group (n=63), and a control group (n=57). The office ergonomics training program was created using an instructional systems design model. A pre/post-training knowledge test was administered to all those who attended the training. Body postures and workstation set-ups were observed before and after the intervention. Perceived control over the physical work environment was higher for both intervention groups as compared to workers in the control group. A significant increase in overall ergonomic knowledge was observed for the intervention groups. Both intervention groups exhibited higher level behavioral translation and had lower musculoskeletal risk than the control group.
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