Chapter

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SHADOW PRACTICE IN LEARNING THE TABLE TENNIS STANDARD FOREHAND DRIVE

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Abstract

The study was conducted in response to the problem on how to develop a practice structure that will promote learning in Table Tennis Physical Education classes even with limited time and inadequate facilities which is a common fixture in Philippine setting. In the present study, the participants (n= 32) were randomly assigned to either one of two subject groups. The experimental group (n= 16) performed the shadow practice while waiting for their turn to practice with multi-balls. The control group (n= 16) practiced with a single ball for each pair of students while waiting for their turn to practice with multi-balls. The commonly used consistency and accuracy skills test was used to determine their pre-test, post-test and retention test scores. The level of significance was at P = .05. Using descriptive measures, the data revealed that both groups showed a significant change in the scores in the post-test phase of testing. The experimental group's mean = 83.5 while this group's pre and post test t =-14.3226. The control group's mean = 81.7 while this group's pre and post test t =-16.02311. However, only the experimental group was able to retain their scores in the retention test phase of testing. The experimental group's mean = 83.4 while this group's post and retention test t = 0.04897. The control group's mean = 78.3 while this group's post and retention test t = 4.6929529.

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Adaptive training of perceptual motor skills; issues, results in motor learning. Exploring the guidance hypothesis
  • G Lintern
  • D Gopher
Lintern, G. and Gopher D. (1978). Adaptive training of perceptual motor skills; issues, results in motor learning. Exploring the guidance hypothesis. Journal of Motor Behavior 22 (pp. 191-208)