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IBAMA 2018 Guidelines - Marine Biota Monitoring in Seismic Surveys

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These are the 2018 IBAMA Guidelines for mitigation of impacts and monitoring of marine fauna in seismic surveys. It replaces the earlier 2005 Guidelines.
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MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
BRAZILIAN INSTITUTE OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND RENEWABLE NATURAL RESOURCES
DIRECTORATE OF ENVIRONMENTAL LICENSING
GENERAL COORDINATION OF MARINE AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENTS
COORDINATION OF OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION
GUIDELINES
MARINE BIOTA MONITORING
IN SEISMIC SURVEYS
(OCTOBER 2018)
Summary
1. Introduction ...........................................................................................................3
1.1. Objectives ........................................................................................................3
1.2. Terminology .....................................................................................................3
2. General precautions to reduce the disturbance caused by marine seismic
surveys .................................................................................................................5
2.1. Survey planning ...............................................................................................5
2.2. During the seismic survey ................................................................................5
3. Specific Procedures ..............................................................................................6
3.1. Training and selection of MMOs and PAM Operators .......................................6
3.2. Observation, detection and record of marine biota ...........................................7
3.2.1 Shutdown of sound sources (air guns) ......................................................9
3.2.2 Procedures for ramp up/soft start of seismic sources ..............................10
3.2.3 Line change procedures..........................................................................10
3.2.4 Night operations or in poor visibility conditions ........................................11
3.2.5 Seismic source tests ...............................................................................12
3.3 Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) ................................................................13
3.3.1 Equipments .............................................................................................13
3.3.2 PAM Operation ........................................................................................14
3.3.3 PAM Register ..........................................................................................15
3.4 Others acquisition techniques ........................................................................16
3.5 Biota monitoring register ................................................................................16
Cover Sheet ..........................................................................................................16
Operation and effort register .................................................................................17
Occurrence records: sighting and acoustic register ...............................................17
4. Marine Biota Monitoring Report ..........................................................................18
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1. Introduction
The first version of this Monitoring Guidelines was issued in April 2005, as one of
the normative documents that IBAMA prepared after CONAMA’s Resolution No. 350/04,
which regulates the environmental licensing of seismic surveys at sea and in transitional
zones land-sea.
Prior to 2005, each entrepreneur would elaborate their monitoring project and
submit it for approval during the environmental licensing process. Based on the
experience of years analyzing these projects and after a review of the international
mitigation practices, IBAMA prepared the first version of the Monitoring Guidelines, which
at the time represented a major advance in the standardization of mitigation and
monitoring in seismic vessels.
With this 2018 revision, IBAMA consolidates more than a decade of learning and
seeks once again to position the Brazilian practice among the most advanced in the
protection of marine biodiversity in the context of seismic surveys.
It should be noted that this Monitoring Guidelines are not a manual of good
practices to be followed voluntarily by the entrepreneur, but mandatory mitigation and
monitoring procedures established by IBAMA as a condition of the Seismic Survey
Licenses (LPS).
Doubts about the application of the guidelines, comments on the implementation
and criticisms/suggestions for the improvement of these Guidelines can be sent to
IBAMA through the electronic address coexp.rj@ibama.gov.br.
A copy of these Monitoring Guidelines should remain on board the seismic
vessels for consultation by all interested parties.
1.1. Objectives
The Marine Biota Monitoring has two objectives: (i) to implement measures to
mitigate the impact of seismic surveying on marine mammals and marine chelonians;
and (ii) to generate standardized data on the occurrence and behavior of these groups
to deepen the understanding of possible effects by the seismic sources. The purpose of
the Guidelines is to guide the entrepreneur and his contractors on how to properly
implement the mitigation and monitoring measures required by IBAMA.
It is important to note that these Guidelines only concern the biota monitoring
carried out onboard the seismic source vessel. Depending on the location of the seismic
survey, additional monitoring and mitigation projects may be required. In the same way,
it should be noted that IBAMA may require more restrictive procedures than those
defined in these Monitoring Guidelines, motivated by environmental and operational
characteristics of the proposed survey.
1.2. Terminology
To make easier the understanding of the procedures described in the Guidelines
and to standardize the communication between IBAMA and the stakeholders, we present
the definition of some terms used throughout this document:
Acquisition Area: area where the actual seismic data acquisition is performed,
including the run in and run out areas. It is represented by a polygon in which source
array is at full power. It is defined in the Seismic Survey License (LPS).
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Maneuvering Area: area in which the vessel makes the line changes. It is
represented by a polygon outside the Acquisition Area. Source array shall not be at full
power in the Maneuvering Area, except for source testing during line changes, which
shall be duly recorded on the operation and effort record worksheet. It is defined in the
Seismic Survey License (LPS).
Activity Area: area defined by the sum of the acquisition area and the
maneuvering area.
Exclusion Area: Hemisphere in the water column formed by a radius of 1,000m,
originated in the center of the seismic source array. The seismic source must be turned
off immediately whenever a marine mammal or chelonian is sighted or detected
acoustically in that region during the normal operating situation, seismic source tests or
soft start procedure (soft start/ramp up). It is referred in the industry by Exclusion Zone
(EZ) or Safety Zone.
Soft start: procedure of soft start of seismic pulse intensity over time. Also known
as ramp up. During the ramp up, seismic firing should be ceased if any marine mammal
or chelonian is detected in the Exclusion Zone.
Sighting or visual detection: detection of marine animals in the seismic vessel
surrounding area, inside or outside the Exclusion Zone. In the specific case of these
guidelines, the main target are the chelonians and marine mammals.
Acoustic detection: detection of vocalization of marine mammals by the operator
of Passive Acoustic Monitoring, inside or outside the Exclusion Zone.
Detection: identification of the presence of marine mammals or chelonians by
visual or acoustic means, inside or outside the Exclusion Zone.
Interruption of seismic sources: a protection measure to marine animals, it
consists on the immediate and simultaneous shutdown of all seismic sources motivated
by a detection according to the conditions established in these Guidelines. Also known
as seismic source shutdown.
Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM): standard procedure adopted by the PAM
Operator in marine seismic surveys, aiming at the acoustic detection of marine mammal
vocalizations.
Onboard observation: a standard procedure adopted by the Marine Mammal
Observer to monitor the marine biota in marine seismic surveys, in a systematic search
for marine animals in the seismic sources surrounding area.
Marine Mammal Observer (MMO): An onboard professional dedicated
exclusively to the visual observation and detection of marine biota during marine seismic
surveys. He/She must have specific training and be able to implement in full and with the
highest quality the procedures established in these Guidelines.
PAM Operator: professional exclusively dedicated to the acoustic detection of the
marine biota during marine seismic surveys. She/He must have specific training and be
able to implement in full and with the highest quality the procedures established in these
Guidelines.
Full power: seismic source activity using maximum volume and power for that
specific project, as informed in the environmental permitting process.
Minimum power: seismic source activity using only the lowest volume source of
the array.
Run in and Run out: areas in the beginning and in the end the of seismic lines,
where sound source is on full power to allow the proper imaging of the geological
objectives’ boundaries. It must be part of the Acquisition Area. Typically, those areas are
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equivalent to 70% of the seismic cable’s length.
Seismic source test: Short duration procedure in which the seismic sources are
activated for calibration purposes or other operational reasons. Priority shall be given to
perform full power tests inside the acquisition area, avoiding the maneuvering area.
Scanning or pre-watch: monitoring procedure prior to seismic source array
activation, with a minimum duration of 30 (thirty) minutes, in which Observers and/or
PAM Operators must pay special attention to the Exclusion Zone. The beginning of shots
will be authorized only if there is no detection of marine mammals and chelonians in this
area during the 30 minutes scan.
2. General precautions to reduce the disturbance caused
by marine seismic surveys
2.1. Survey planning
Before applying for the environmental permit, the entrepreneur must:
Get informed about the occurrence of marine mammals and chelonians in the
polygon of interest and if there are known areas or periods of feeding, mating, nursing,
migration or spawning. The schedule of the activity should be planned to avoid such
periods and areas.
Plan the activities so that it does not overlap the restricted areas and periods
defined by the Joint Normative Instructions IBAMA/ICMBio 01/2011 and 02/2011 (see
Appendix);
Get informed about the presence of other seismic surveys being planned or
already in permitting process for the same region and adjust the schedules in order to
avoid spatial and temporal overlapping activities. In case of overlapping seismic surveys,
special operating arrangements may be required of the proposing companies, as well as
the adoption of additional mitigation and monitoring measures. Depending on the case,
the environmental viability to carry out the overlapping activity may be denied.
Plan hiring qualified MMOs and PAM Operators capable of implementing in full
and with the highest quality the procedures defined in this Guide. They must be
registered in the Federal Technical Registry (CTF-IBAMA);
Plan to use air gun arrays that: (i) have the lowest possible energy output, (ii)
minimize the horizontal emission of acoustic energy, and (iii) minimize sound emission
at higher frequencies than those required for the data acquisition.
Invest in technologies and operational alternatives that reduce the contribution
of noise and that are less impacting to the environment.
2.2. During the seismic survey
During the seismic survey, the entrepreneur must:
Ensure the correct application of the mitigation procedures established in these
Guidelines.
Do not fire the seismic sources more than what is necessary for normal
operation and minimize engaging the seismic sources for tests and equipment
calibration.
Activating the seismic sources outside the Acquisition Area is prohibited, except
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for soft start and tests during line changes, which must be properly logged in the
operation and effort record worksheet and restricted to the Maneuvering Area. Tests at
full power should occur preferably within the Acquisition Area.
Ensure that MMOs and PAM operators have an effective and direct
communication channel with the seismic crew, so they can immediately request the
seismic sources shutdown whenever required.
Conduct meetings in the first shift on board of each crew member responsible
for the seismic operation to review the procedures for the marine biota monitoring,
minimizing the chances of communication failures. It is recommended to perform drills
to allow all parties involved to know how to act during a real detection inside the Exclusion
Zone.
Allow MMOs and PAM operators to access the official activity logs, including
those related to the night time operations, such as vessel positioning and water depth,
start and end of sound source activities, tests periods, soft start and full power, as well
as other operational information (offsets, etc.).
Ensure that MMOs and PAM operators are consulted 30 minutes prior to the
start of the ramp up procedure so they can proceed the pre-watch scanning. The seismic
sources should only be engaged, even with the soft start procedure, after a period of 30
minutes without detection of mammals or marine chelonians in the Exclusion Zone, i.e.,
less than 1000 meters from the center of the seismic source array.
If, for any reason, during the ramp up procedure or at full power, in tests,
maneuvering or during acquisition, the seismic sources are interrupted and do not
restarted within 5 minutes, the scan procedures/pre-watch (30 minutes) and ramp up
(minimum 20 minutes) must be implemented prior to restarting seismic sources activity.
In the case of interruptions shorter than 5 minutes, the activity can be resumed with the
same power. If animals are detected in the Exclusion Zone during this 5-minute interval,
a new scanning and soft start procedure must be implemented.
Ensure that seismic crew onboard understand all the procedures of the
Guidelines;
Place in appropriate areas of the vessel, such as the instrument room and
bridge, bilingual flowcharts (Portuguese - English) detailing the internal communication
procedures that lead to the interruption or delay of the seismic source engagement start
due to the presence of marine mammals or chelonians in the Exclusion Zone.
It is not allowed the intentional approach between the vessels involved in the
seismic survey and any marine mammals detected in the operations area. No attempt to
drive away or scare the animals should be made.
It is important to emphasize that the Licensee is the ultimate responsible for
implementing the procedures established by these Monitoring Guidelines, even if there
are other stakeholders involved with objective responsibility, such as consultants and
service providers.
3. Specific Procedures
3.1. Training and selection of MMOs and PAM Operators
The entrepreneur is responsible for hiring professionals capable of performing
the biota monitoring with the highest quality. To this end, the selection of MMOs and
PAM operators must meet the following criteria:
Each Observer onboard team consists of at least 3 (three) professionals on
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board, so that at least 2 (two) are in simultaneous observation effort throughout the day
period;
All Observers onboard should have higher education in a compatible area such
as Biology, Oceanography, Fishery Engineering or Veterinary. Previous academic
experience with marine mammals is desirable.
At least 2 (two) professionals from each observer team must have prior
experience in observing marine biota in the same role onboard seismic vessels for 100
days, at least;
All Observers onboard must undergo training regarding the marine biota
monitoring procedures and internal communication;
At least two professionals from each team must be fluent in English so that there
is clear communication between them and the other crew members of the seismic vessel.
The entrepreneur is responsible for ensuring that the hiring of the observer’s team
is in compliance with the applicable labor legislation, even if the hiring is done through a
consulting company. Likewise, it is the responsibility of the contractor to provide the
observers onboard with the safety training required as minimum requirements for the
performance of offshore activities.
3.2. Observation, detection and record of marine biota
The onboard observation must occur throughout the daytime period, as long as
there are adequate conditions of visibility. Monitoring should always be carried out
simultaneously by at least two MMOs regardless of whether the seismic sources are
engaged or not, for example during line change, in the event of technical problems with
the sound sources or during navigation between the port and the activity area. This effort
is important for the improvement of the observation technique and to increase the
knowledge on the marine mammals and chelonians distribution in Brazilian waters,
besides making possible comparative analyzes of sightings under different operations
conditions.
The entrepreneur must make available to the Observers onboard all the material
necessary for the full performance of their functions, such as binoculars, cameras,
portable radios and others. The material provided must have quality and specifications
compatible with the work to be performed (e.g. reticulated binoculars and digital cameras
with adequate resolution, optical zoom and storage capacity). Identification guides
should be available on the vessel, covering the species that occur in the region.
Whenever possible, environmental reports of past activities should be available for
observers to consult.
For the representation of sightings and detections of biota, the diagram shown in
Figure 1 shall be used. The observer responsible for the sighting shall use the diagram
to illustrate the position of the animals and their movement throughout the sighting. The
times and positions of the main observed events, such as the first position sighted, the
last sighted position, the first sighting within the Exclusion Zone and the shorter distance
from the seismic source, should be recorded.
To record positions, use the radial coordinate system shown in the diagram where
the distance classes are given letters A through E and the radial sectors are given
numbers from 1 to 8. Thus, a specific position can be recorded by the A1 or E7, for
example.
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Figure 1 - Diagram of biota observation representing: the center of the airgun
array (center of the figure), the 1.000 m Area of Exclusion, the distance classes related
to the center of the seismic source (letters A-E) and the sectors corresponding to the
direction of the sighting relative to the seismic source (numbers 1-8). The position of the
vessel varies with each activity and must illustrated by the observer.
The following procedures should be adopted as a way to standardize the
observation and ensuring the effectiveness of the observation effort:
Each source vessel must have at least 3 (three) observers onboard so at least
2 (two) can simultaneously divide the visual field into two parts, and thus cover the entire
Exclusion Zone (Figure 1).
For the observation effort, the Observers should seek positioning on high points
of the vessel, allowing the maximum range and possible coverage of the Exclusion Zone.
Whenever possible, each Observer should be positioned on one side of the vessel
("wings"), taking turns periodically to minimize visual fatigue. The centralized positioning
of the observers should be avoided. The best positioning, angle and range of vision
should be demonstrated in the report, including the photographic records. It is up to the
entrepreneur to provide the appropriate conditions for the onboard observation,
considering parameters of comfort and ergonomics.
During the rest and meal periods of the professionals, a rotation system must
be adopted to always maintain at least two observers monitoring.
The observer's work regime should include periods of observation effort with
rest periods and meal stops. It is suggested that the maximum time spent in continuous
observation effort is 2 (two) hours, to avoid a reduction in work quality due to fatigue.
This maximum period can be extended in case of observation of animals in the area of
Direction of vessel movement
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the activity. The rest period should be at least 30 minutes without any observation job.
Binoculars with reticulum should be used to allow estimation of sighting
distance. Complementary methods that may increase the accuracy of measurements are
stimulated.
Since the distance between the seismic vessel and the air guns can vary
between different operations, the Onboard Observer team must "calibrate" the binoculars
before each activity to obtain more accurate distance estimative. At least distances of
500 and 1000 meters should be calibrated, as they are important for evaluating the
classes of distance of the animal to the seismic source. Whenever there are significant
changes in the positioning of the air gun array the calibration should be redone. The
entrepreneur is responsible for providing the material and logistic conditions for carrying
out the calibration, such as providing the boat for operational support (work boat) and
human resources for the job. It is suggested to consolidate the calibration in a diagram
to be maintained with the observers for reference during the observation effort. The
calibration procedure carried out shall be included in the activity report.
Even after the calibration of the reticulated binoculars, there is considerable
inaccuracy in the estimation of distances. The Observer should consider this inaccuracy
when determining the application of the mitigation procedure. When in doubt, the
estimate must always be conservative and the decision in favor of the protection of
animals.
The observation effort should be initiated as soon as possible, as soon as the
sunlight allows and must continue uninterrupted until the low light of the afternoon, when
the observation becomes impossible. The standard time for the start and end of the
observation effort shall be determined by the sunrise and sunset times indicated on the
ship's navigational instrumentation. These times must be checked weekly and
communicated to the seismic team leader.
All mammals and marine chelonians detected should be recorded in the
standard worksheets, even if they are located beyond the Exclusion Zone.
All information must be collected in accordance with the attached standard
worksheets plus any added details the observers may deem pertinent.
The worksheets should be filled according to the instructions in the Instructions
for completing the monitoring worksheets. Whenever possible, the photographic or
video recording of the observations should be carried out as long as it does not
jeopardize the implementation of mitigation measures. Video recording may be
especially useful to assist the Observers in determining the species sighted.
Any extraordinary reason justifying interruption of the observation effort should
be reported in the Operation Log and Monitoring Effort Worksheet in the Observations
and comments field.
Any observation of mammals or marine chelonians carried out by the crew of
the support vessel and assistant vessel shall be promptly informed to the onboard
Observers for the detection, recording and identification of the animals and the adoption
of mitigation measures when relevant.
3.2.1 Shutdown of sound sources (air guns)
The main mitigation procedure to be adopted during the seismic survey in relation
to the marine biota is the shutdown, which should obey the following guidelines:
• During the seismic survey, when a marine mammal or chelonian is detected in
the Exclusion Zone, the MMOs and PAM Operators must inform the seismic crew to
immediately cease the seismic sources.
The obligation to cease the seismic sources in the event of biota detection within
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the Exclusion Zone applies in any situation where sound sources are active, either in
operation at full power, in tests or during the soft start.
The communication procedure among the MMOs, PAM Operators and the
person in charge of the seismic survey must be clear and simple so that the operation
can be suspended at any time. There should be no intermediate procedures that delay
the shutdown of the seismic sources. Mitigation is the priority; any questions and
discussions should only happen after full shutdown.
Shutdown of the seismic sources is the priority mitigation procedure and should
be carried out in any situation where marine mammals or chelonians are detected in the
Exclusion Zone, even at night or in poor visibility conditions.
3.2.2 Procedures for ramp up/soft start of seismic sources
The soft start or ramp up procedure should be always implemented prior to the
activation to seismic sources, whether for normal operation or sources testing. About
tests, see specific item below.
The main concept of the procedure is to initiate the operation with low intensity
pulses to enable the marine organisms with mobility capacity the opportunity to move
away from the noise source. The main steps to follow in this procedure are presented
below:
1. Notify the MMOs and PAM operators on the intention to initiate the ramp up
procedure at least 30 minutes in advance.
2. MMOs and PAM Operators shall scan for at least 30 minutes prior to the activation
of any seismic source to check the presence of animals in the Exclusion Zone. If no
marine mammal or sea turtle is detected, the ramp up procedure may be started.
3. If a marine mammal or chelonian is detected within the Exclusion Zone, the activation
of the seismic source should be delayed until no animals are detected in this area for
at least 30 minutes. It shall not, under any circumstances, be carried out any attempts
to intentionally approach and drive away the animals from the Exclusion Zone.
4. The soft start of the seismic pulse intensity should be initiated with the activation of
the array smallest sound source, in terms of acoustic energy released (dB re 1μPa)
and volume (pol³). The other sound sources must be added to the pulse gradually
over time until reaching full power. During the ramp up procedure, the time interval
between the pulses should be the same as used for data acquisition. The ramp up
procedure should last at least 20 minutes until full power is reached. To minimize the
emission of sound energy in the marine environment, the procedure should not last
more than 40 minutes.
5. If animals are detected within the Exclusion Zone during the ramp up procedure, the
seismic sources should be immediately ceased until the organisms spontaneously
move away and after 30 minutes of clearance with no any animal being detected
within the Exclusion Zone, the ramp up should be restarted (with a minimum duration
of 20 minutes).
6. The soft start shall be planned to reach full power as close as possible to the start of
the seismic line (including Run in). Long periods at full power before the effective
start of data acquisition will be considered abusive.
3.2.3 Line change procedures
By moving from one line to another, the seismic vessel may take from a few
minutes to a few hours, depending on the type and geometry of the acquisition and the
oceanographic and meteorological conditions.
Regarding the scanning and soft start procedures during the change of line, it is
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stablished:
Line changes with duration of less than 20 minutes: the seismic source should
not be interrupted, maintaining full power during the entire maneuver.
Line changes with duration of more than 20 minutes: the seismic source must
be suspended at the end of each line and restarted according to the normal scanning
procedure (30 min) and soft start (minimum 20min/maximum 40min). If the line change
lasts longer than 20 and less than 50 minutes, the pre-shooting scan (30 min) may be
started at the end of the previous seismic line, during full power operation.
3.2.4 Night operations or in poor visibility conditions
During the seismic survey, there are periods when visibility conditions are
impaired due to the absence of natural light, sea conditions, fog or heavy rain, for
example. At night or in poor visibility conditions, it is not possible to perform visual
monitoring of the presence of marine mammals or chelonians in the Exclusion Zone. In
this way, the night operation or in poor visibility conditions will only be allowed with the
use of Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM).
During the daytime period, when visibility conditions worsen, it is possible that the
visual detection capability of animals becomes very restricted to the vicinity of the seismic
vessel, so this situation needs to be recorded in the activity report.
In this sense, to help define what are poor visibility conditions, the following
parameters should be considered:
Sea and Wind State: sea state on the Beaufort 6 scale with wind speed from
26 knots. From these conditions on, the surface of the sea presents ripples, foam and
splashes of water that prevent the observation of animals on the surface; or
Fog or rain around the ship: when there is dense fog or heavy rain around the
ship, forming a "curtain" that makes it impossible to observe the entire Area of Exclusion;
or
Visibility of the horizon line: when it is not possible to identify the horizon line,
making it impossible to use the reticules of the binoculars to determine the Exclusion
Zone. Despite of these parameters, the MMO team has the autonomy and authority to
determine the poor visibility situation, even if the above parameters have not been met.
There is no need to stop the observation effort while there is natural light, once
the Passive Acoustic Monitoring is operational, enabling the continuity of the mitigation.
Thus, if safety conditions allow, observers should remain at their observation posts.
During periods of poor visibility conditions, if there is a need to perform the scan
prior to the beginning of the gradual increase, this can be done through Passive Acoustic
Monitoring. MMOs must maintain visual scanning simultaneously, as conditions permit.
If PAM is not operational, the scan cannot be performed, and the seismic sources may
not be started.
Any sightings performed under poor visibility conditions are still able to determine
the interruption of the activity if they occur within the Exclusion Zone. In such cases, the
resumption of activity will occur through the soft start procedure, conditioned to the
absence of visual or acoustic detection for at least 30 minutes, as detailed in the specific
item in this guide.
The level of visibility when the animal is detected should be indicated on the
sighting record. The periods of poor visibility conditions must be indicated in the
Operation Log and Monitoring Effort Worksheet.
Although mitigation based on visual monitoring continues to be performed under
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poor visibility conditions, the duration of these periods should not be considered as an
effective observation effort for analysis of sighting/effort indicators.
The following guidelines are for specific operational situations related to the night
operation or in poor visibility conditions:
With the PAM in full operation, the seismic acquisition can be started at night or
in poor conditions of visibility, provided that the established procedures for scanning
(acoustic) and soft start are followed.
If PAM is temporarily suspended and the operation enters the night time or poor
visibility conditions, the continuity of the current seismic line is allowed for a maximum
period of one hour. After this period, the activity of the seismic source must be suspended
until the system is repaired or mitigation by visual monitoring is possible.
If visibility conditions worsen during an interruption caused by visual or acoustic
detection, the operation may be restarted by standard (acoustic) scan procedure and
ramp up, since the Passive Acoustic Monitoring is fully active.
If visual observation becomes possible again during an acoustic scanning
procedure for line start or test, it is not necessary to restart the procedure. Simultaneous
visual scanning of the acoustics shall be implemented during the remaining of the 30
minutes scan. Similarly, in case of loss of visibility conditions during a joint scan, the
procedure must be continued only with acoustic scanning.
With PAM in full operation, seismic source tests can be performed at night or in
poor visibility conditions, provided that the established procedures for scanning
(acoustic) and soft start are followed.
It is prohibited to use the "alternative mitigation mechanism" known in the jargon
as "night operation", mitigation gun or single gun.
3.2.5 Seismic source tests
For conducting tests of the seismic source, the guidelines for pre-scanning and
soft start of the seismic pulse must be followed. In these cases, the soft start should not
reach a power higher than that of the test.
If the test is performed with a power lower than the power used in the seismic
survey (full power), the duration of the soft start must be proportionally adjusted to the
power used in the test to avoid excessive sound pulses in the environment. In other
words, the same rate of increase (ramp) normally used in the soft start procedure for a
given seismic array must be maintained until the desired power for the test is reached.
In the case of tests immediately preceding the start of seismic lines, the duration
of the soft start between the end of the test and the beginning of the line shall also be
proportionally adjusted between the power of the test and the full power. That is, to
perform the soft start between the test and the full power, there is no need to restart the
procedure with minimum power, but gradually increase the test power to full power,
keeping the same ramp used in the gradual increase.
If the test involves sound pulses at minimum power, the pre-scanning is
maintained, but there is no need to adopt the soft start procedure.
In any situation, shots should be immediately suspended if marine mammals or
chelonians are detected in the Exclusion Zone.
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3.3 Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM)
The known limitations of visual monitoring of the marine biota at night time and in
poor visibility conditions led to the development of new methodologies for mitigation of
the effects of seismic surveys on marine fauna. This innovation process has produced
at least one functional technology: Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM).
The PAM uses underwater acoustic sensors to detect the vocalization of marine
mammals, allowing the application of mitigating measures even when the animal is not
close to the surface or there are no conditions for visual detection. Although still a
developing technology with great potential for improvement, its increased use in seismic
surveys has demonstrated relevant value for mitigating the impact of cetacean activity.
Considering that the PAM is now the only tool that allows the underwater
detection of marine mammals, IBAMA establishes its mandatory use in marine seismic
surveys in Brazil. Acting in a coordinated way with visual observation, PAM can
significantly increase the effectiveness of acoustic impact mitigation on marine
mammals.
Since there is still a great variation between the PAM systems in use, it is
necessary to present a Passive Acoustic Monitoring Project in the context of each
specific environmental permitting process. Some guidelines for the preparation of these
projects are presented below.
3.3.1 Equipments
The acoustic arrangements used in the PAM typically consist in pairs of
hydrophones installed along the cables that are towed to the stern of the source vessel.
It is the company's responsibility to use equipment that corresponds to the state-of-the-
art of passive acoustic monitoring technology embedded in seismic vessels.
In addition to the intrinsic quality of the equipment, the proper positioning of the
hydrophones is important for capturing the vocalizations of marine mammals, since the
ship's engines and the trawling of seismic acquisition equipment are important sources
of underwater noise. If PAM hydrophones are too close to the stern of the ship or near
the surface, the ambient noise picked up by the equipment will negatively affect the
detection of sounds emitted by marine mammals, especially those at low frequencies.
The positioning of each PAM array will depend on the stern configuration of each
ship, considering the different acquisition methodologies (2D, 3D, Streamers, OBC,
OBN, etc.). However, it is possible to establish some benchmarks, namely:
- Minimum distance between the first pair of hydrophones and the stern: 200
meters or more.
- Minimum distance between pairs of hydrophones: 100 meters or more.
- Depth of operation: 20 meters or deeper.
The proposal of positioning of PAM equipment in disagreement with these
parameters must be justified in the respective licensing process. If adequate detection
capability is not demonstrated, the operation may be subjected to additional mitigation
measures, such as daytime-only operation or the use of MAP in presence/absence mode
- that is, any detection leads to interruption of activity regardless of the estimated
distance.
Depending on the stern configuration, lateral drift can pose a significant risk of
cable entanglement during seismic line change maneuvers. In such cases, in order to
avoid interruption of the monitoring to change position of the PAM equipment, it is
recommended to provide a kit of equipment for each side of the ship, allowing the
unilateral pickup during the maneuver without loss to the monitoring.
Regarding the recording/processing equipment, the company is responsible for
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providing adequate location to carry out the work of the PAM Operators. Special attention
should be given to the ergonomics of the workstation, as the PAM operation involves
long hours sitting in front of monitors in an uninterrupted work scale. In addition, a
consensual work scale should be established that allows the acoustic monitoring 24
hours to operate without loss to adequate periods of sleep, rest and feeding for the PAM
Operators, as well as considerations about the fatigue in the detection capacity resulting
from long periods of activity monitoring. It is important to remember that operating the
PAM involves performing deck jobs for adjustments, maintenance or repairs to the
equipment, which should be considered when scaling the work timetable.
It is recommended to use the PAMGuard program to manage and record
detections, as it has been developed collaboratively for years and is considered an open
source standard for passive acoustic monitoring in maritime seismic surveys. Use of
other software solutions is permitted, provided the same level of PAMGuard performance
is assured. The software to be used in the PAM must be informed in the environmental
licensing process.
3.3.2 PAM Operation
The acoustic detection effort should occur 24 hours a day. Whenever operating
conditions allows, acoustic monitoring must be performed whether or not the vessel is
with the seismic sources activated, for example during line changes or in case of
technical problems with the sound sources. This effort is important for the improvement
of the detection technique, adjustments to the equipment, and to increase the knowledge
about the distribution of marine mammals in Brazilian waters, their vocalization patterns,
and to enable comparative analysis of the detections under different operating
conditions.
Any interruptions in the PAM due to technical or operational issues must be
reported in the Operation and Effort Record worksheet. In order to minimize interruptions
in the acoustic detection effort, spare components must be on board for the entire PAM
system. If the equipment presents technical problems that prevent proper acoustic
detection for more than 15 minutes, the following guidelines apply:
(a) if the problem occurs at night or in poor visibility conditions with the sound
sources on, the continuity of the seismic line in progress shall be allowed for a maximum
period of one hour. After this period, the activity of the seismic source must be suspended
until the PAM system is repaired or mitigation by visual monitoring is possible.
(b) seismic operation shall be allowed exclusively during the daytime period with
visual monitoring, for a maximum period of 48 hours running from the moment the
problem was established. At the end of this period, the seismic survey activity should be
completely interrupted until the full functioning of the PAM is reestablished.
(c) if during the 48 hours period poor conditions of visibility occurs, continuity of
the seismic line in progress will be allowed for a maximum period of one hour. After this
period, the activity of the seismic source must be suspended until the PAM system is
repaired or mitigation by visual monitoring is possible.
The PAM operation team must be formed by at least three professionals - four
are recommended for better 24 hours monitoring support - and should be exclusively
dedicated to the operation of this project. At least two of these professionals must have
proven experience as PAM operators in seismic vessels. All must have compatible
higher education and specific training on the technology and its application. The less
experienced professional should have the assistance and supervision of the most
experienced professionals. PAM Operators must have sufficient fluency in the English
language so that there is clear communication with the other crew members of the
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Marine Biota Monitoring Guidelines October/2018
seismic vessel.
The entrepreneur is responsible for ensuring that the hiring of the PAM Operators
team follows the applicable labor laws, even if the hiring is done through a consulting
company. Likewise, it is the responsibility of the entrepreneur to provide PAM Operators
with the required safety training as minimum requirements for offshore activities.
PAM Operators must be able to configure the capture and recording equipment
to obtain the best possible detection condition, understanding the limitations of the
technology and reacting to them always in a conservative manner, for the benefit of the
protection of the marine mammals. PAM Operators should wisely use PAMGuard
automatic alarm devices, but should also exercise their best judgment when detected
vocalizations do not trigger such alarms.
Mitigation is the primary goal of monitoring and the PAM Operators have the
authority to request the interruption of the shots if they judge to have identified animals
that may be within 1000 meters of the seismic source. Even in cases where the system
is unable to estimate the precise detection distance, the PAM Operators must use
bioacoustics knowledge to exercise its authority for mitigation purposes. As an example,
if high frequency clicks typical of dolphins are detected, they should be assumed to be
located less than 1000 meters from PAM hydrophones, given the rapid sound decay that
these high frequencies suffer from distance. Likewise, if a low frequency vocalization,
typical of Mysticeti, is strong enough to trigger PAMGuard automatic alarm, is probably
in the vicinity of the PAM array because it was able to overcome the ambient noise that
normally hinders the detections in those frequencies.
To reduce the subjectivity in the decision making about the mitigation through the
passive acoustic monitoring, each team of PAM Operators must define, before the
beginning of the activity, a protocol of mitigation to be adopted by all the operators during
that seismic survey. The protocol should consider the specific characteristics and
conditions of the array in use and aim for a consistent and conservative decision making.
It is important to recognize that PAM arrays currently used have yet to evolve to
increase detection efficiency. In this sense, it is fundamental to invest in the development
of solutions to challenges such as the masking of low frequency vocalizations by ship
noise, acoustic shadowing that the vessel and the seismic source produce or the
persistent difficulty of estimating distance and laterality of vocalizations. Proposals for
testing new technologies or alternative methods for PAM are encouraged.
3.3.3 PAM Register
The new guidelines seek a convergence between the registrations of visual and
acoustic monitoring. Accordingly, standard spreadsheets for acoustic detection logs
(attached) are being proposed and a unified Operation and Effort Logging worksheet,
valid for the monitoring of the biota as a whole. Each company must manage the best
way to record Operation and Effort data, since it involves both visual and acoustic
monitoring.
Concerning the acoustic detection evidences (or absence thereof), analogous to
the photographic record for sightings, PAM should generate records in the form of sound
clips (.wav or equivalent files) of the whole detection length. In the case of subsequent
scanning to the stoppage by acoustic or visual detection of animals in the Exclusion
Zone, it is requested to record the audio file referring to the 30 minutes without detection,
according to the procedure stipulated in this guide, for auditing purposes.
In case of detections that did not cause the interruption of the seismic source, it
is necessary to record in the spreadsheet of detection of the reason that led to the
decision to not interrupt the operation.
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The activity report shall include a record of the settings used in the PAM
operation, considering software and equipment, including any changes made during the
seismic survey. Information on changes in the positioning of all elements of the PAM
array (distance to the stern, lateral positioning, depth, etc.) and the program used
(parameters, filters, processing, etc.) should be provided. Software configuration files
used in the monitoring (e.g. .psf extension) must be kept by the company responsible for
eventual verification of the parameters used, if required by IBAMA.
Additional guidance on PAM records can be generated within each licensing
process.
3.4 Other acquisition techniques
When acquiring geometries that require more than one seismic vessel, such as
bottom cable techniques (OBC), Nodes (OBN), Wide Azimuth, or others, biota observers
(MMOs) and the PAM system shall be located on the source vessel. If the acquisition
geometry employs more than one source at the same time, all source vessels must have
MMOs and PAM systems. Specific situations that may require more adequate monitoring
strategies should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis in the Environmental permitting
process. All other requirements of these guidelines are valid for these operations, that
is, each source vessel must comply with mitigation and monitoring requirements.
3.5 Biota monitoring register
In addition to establishing mandatory mitigation measures, the Marine Biota
Monitoring Project also aims to generate standard data on the occurrence and behavior
of marine mammals and chelonians, to deepen the understanding of the possible effects
caused by the seismic sources.
To record the information, MMOs and PAM Operators must use the following
worksheets in annex: (i) Operation and Effort Register and (ii) Sighting Record (visual
monitoring) or (iii) Detection Record (acoustic monitoring). At the end of the survey, the
information regarding sightings and acoustic detections should be consolidated in the
General Record worksheet, according to the following guidance. A cover sheet template
is also provided, which should open the project report.
Considering that the visual and acoustic modalities of biota monitoring have
similar objectives, the activity report should be presented in an integrated way. However,
given the typical characteristics of the monitoring, the report should contain subitems
with specific discussions of visual and acoustic monitoring, as well as the integrated
discussion about the marine biota monitoring. Given the difficulty of establishing that an
acoustic detection corresponds to a particular visual detection, each detection must
generate an independent record of occurrence, even if they are simultaneous.
Simultaneous detection of two (or more) independent groups (of the same
species or not) should generate two (or more) occurrence records.
Following are some supplementary guidelines for completing the biota monitoring
record sheets.
Cover Sheet
The Cover Sheet should open the Report of the Marine Biota Monitoring Project
and the Passive Acoustic Monitoring, containing the basic information about the activity
and the professionals involved in the monitoring.
Special attention should be given to completing the information regarding the total
number of Record Worksheets that are being sent. By signing the Cover Sheet, the Team
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Marine Biota Monitoring Guidelines October/2018
Coordinator and the MMOs and PAM Operators are confirming that the total number of
worksheets forwarded is the one entered in this field.
Operation and effort register
Data on the observation and acoustic monitoring effort and the seismic survey
itself must be recorded in the Operation and Effort Register. It must be filled continuously
during the days onboard, even during periods in transit or without acquisition of seismic
data. Each seismic line or test should receive an identification code of their choice,
preferably using the same nomenclature used by the seismic survey and in the other
parts of the activity report, as in the map of the navigation lines. The times reported must
be consistent with those of the official record of the operation. That is, the clocks used
by MMOs and PAM operators must be synchronized with the time used by the seismic
survey.
In the Remarks fields any abnormalities in monitoring, such as effort interruption,
technical problems or poor visibility conditions, must be recorded.
The Operation and Effort Register should be sent only in digital format, in
LibreOffice format (.ods), with a copy in .pdf format to guarantee the fidelity of the
information.
Occurrence records: sighting and acoustic register
The worksheets are designed to record the fauna found during monitoring, both
visual and acoustic. Each type of occurrence sheet (sighting and acoustics) contains an
onboard spreadsheet for recording individual occurrences, and a general spreadsheet,
where all occurrences must be consolidated at the end of the activity. There is also a
spreadsheet for each type of record of occurrence, containing the description of each
field to be filled, including expected format and sample fill.
Taxonomic identification should be performed to the level of certainty possible,
and it is preferable to record a previous taxonomic level than an uncertain assessment.
Information related to the environmental conditions (location, depth, sea state,
etc.) are those from the beginning of detection. If longer than 30 minutes, variations in
these environmental conditions can be recorded in the Remarks field.
The data to be recorded should preferably be collected next to the instrument
room of the ship.
In the field for the total time of activity interruption should be told the time at which
the activity remained with the seismic sources ceased (downtime) due to some biota
detection, separating the visual and acoustic detections. This includes the scan and ramp
up time required for resuming shots.
If the detection occurs during a scan prior to the start of the seismic line, causing
the scan to stop and restart after the end of the detection, this time must be counted as
the activity interruption time. In the event of interruption caused by a detection in which
the Head of Operations decides not to resume the operation as soon as possible, but to
initiate a line change or other activity that does not involve the acquisition of data, this
interval should not be effectively attributed to the mitigation as interruption of activity.
On the back of the Sighting Worksheet there is a field containing a sighting
diagram. We suggest that the diagram be filled using arrows in order to identify the
distance (using the scale), the time and direction of movement of the animal relative to
the seismic vessel. However, the observer should evaluate how best to graphically
describe the sighting. A more detailed description of the sighting can be presented in the
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Observations field. The movement time of the animal between two points is important
information and should be provided whenever possible. Any irregularities in the
mitigation procedures should be reported in this field.
As the distance between the ship and the air guns can vary with each operation,
it was decided not to represent the seismic vessel in the sighting diagram. Thus, the
observer must draw the ship on the diagram considering the actual distance between it
and the seismic sources array.
All Sighting and Detection Record Worksheets should be numbered sequentially
and signed by the observer or the duo responsible for the sighting in question.
Spreadsheet completion can be done by hand or through an electronic
spreadsheet application such as LibreOffice Calc or Microsoft Excel. However, even in
the case of electronic publishing, all spreadsheets must be printed and signed by the
person responsible for filling it. Scanning of signed worksheets should be done in color
mode. Sighting/detection data for marine mammals should be inserted into the Marine
Mammal Monitoring System - SIMMAM. The data entered in SIMMAM will be considered
"published data", since they are replicated in the reports sent to IBAMA, eminently public.
4. Marine Biota Monitoring Report
At the end of the seismic survey activity, the monitoring results should be
consolidated in the final Activity Report of the company to be sent to IBAMA.
The marine biota monitoring report must be delivered in print and digital format,
with the exception of the spreadsheets indicated as exclusively digital. It should contain
both the documentation of the records made and an analytical discussion of the results,
contemplating at least the following items:
Documentation of the records: The original cover sheet containing the name,
training, registration in the Federal Technical Registry and signature of all onboard
observers (MMOs) and PAM operators, in addition to the total number of worksheets of
Sightings and Acoustic Detection.
- The worksheets of the Sightings and Acoustic Detection register, signed by the
professionals responsible for collecting the data. The scanned version should be colored.
Photos and print screens inserted in spreadsheets must also be provided in a separate
folder with the identification of the associated detection.
- Consolidated spreadsheets for general recording of sightings and acoustic
detections.
- Presentation of marine biota occurrence data in digital media, in shapefile (.shp)
files: one file for visual detections and another for acoustic detections. The shapefiles
should be referenced in the SIRGAS 2000 reference geodesic system and contain a
table of attributes based on the general register worksheets. That is, each point should
be associated with sighting/detection information as set out in the general record
worksheets.
- The Operation and Effort Register, in digital format.
Results and discussions:
In addition to the registration worksheets, the Final Activity Report should present
the consolidation of the results achieved and an analytical discussion on the monitoring
of biota applied on board, containing at least:
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- Consolidated presentation of the results, with the aid of maps, graphs and
tables; - Analysis of the composition of species sighted in relation to their known
geographical distribution patterns, with emphasis on rare or unusual records or that
deserve spotlight, for any reason;
- Analysis of the relation "total operating time" x "time without shots by downtime",
that is, how much the mitigation represented in percentage of the total time of activity;
- Analysis of the patterns of biota occurrence in the periods "with shots" and
"without shots" (sources on/off);
- Calculation of total "sighting frequency" and per species/group per unit time
(1000 hours), i.e. the number of sightings per observation effort unit;
- Calculation of the total "acoustic detection frequency" and per species/group
per unit of time (1000 hours), i.e. the number of sightings per unit of detection effort;
- Discussion on possible relationships of seismic survey activity and the biota
records made, focusing on behavioral reactions. For example, the differences between
sightings with air guns on and off, or potential patterns observed in the frequency of
occurrences in the different classes of distance or radial direction, should be analyzed;
- Description of any problems encountered during the monitoring of the biota, with
emphasis on compliance with the mitigation measures and on the requests of the team
of MMOs or PAM Operators;
- Description of the PAM configuration used throughout the activity, including any
modifications caused by changes in the positioning or launch conditions of the seismic
and PAM equipment;
- Comparative analysis between the effectiveness of the visual and acoustic
method for the detection of species and the application of mitigation mechanisms;
- Suggestions for improving the monitoring of marine biota and difficulties
observed in its implementation;
- Photos and other documents that illustrate the project implementation and
development, such as, for example, calibration records of binoculars and observation
stations;
- Proof of the insertion of the biota data in SIMMAM.
The guidelines for submitting the activity report may be modified or supplemented
in the individual environmental licensing processes.
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ANNEX 1
Marine Biota Monitoring
Worksheets
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Cover Sheet
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Operation and Effort Register
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Sighting Register
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Acoustic Detection Register
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ANNEX 2
Marine Mammals Areas of Restriction
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REGULATORY JOINT INSTRUCTION IBAMA/ICMBIO Nº 02, of 21.11.2011
THE PRESIDENT OF THE BRAZILIAN INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENT AND RENEWABLE
NATURAL RESOURCES - IBAMA, in the use of the attributions provided in art. 22, Annex I
of the Regimental Structure approved by Decree No. 6,099, of April 26, 2007, and the
PRESIDENT OF THE CHICO MENDES INSTITUTE OF CONSERVATION OF
BIODIVERSITY - ICMBio, in the use of the powers conferred by Decree No. 6,100, dated April
26, 2007 and by Ordinance No. 532 / Civil House, dated July 30, 2008, published in the Official
Gazette of July 31, 2008, and:
Considering the principles and guidelines for the conservation of biodiversity established in the
National Biodiversity Policy established by Decree No. 4,339 of August 22, 2002;
Considering that IBAMA must define, by means of an administrative act, the areas and periods of
periodic, temporary or permanent restriction to carry out the activities of seismic data
acquisition at sea and in transition zones, according to CONAMA Resolution No. 350, of July
6 of 2004;
Whereas the aquatic mammals Megaptera novaeangliae (Humpback whale), Eubalaena australis
(Southern right whale), Pontoporia blainvillei (Franciscana) and Trichechus manatus (Marine
manatee) are included in the National List of Brazilian Endangered Species of the Normative
Instruction of the Ministry of the Environment n ° 003, of May 27, 2003;
Considering the precautionary principle and that seismic data acquisition activities of oil and gas
exploration and production activities may have a negative impact on aquatic mammals.
Considering the recommendations of the Working Group on Oil and Gas Exploration and Production
Activities (Ordinance No. 2040, dated December 5, 2005 and amended by Ordinance No.
2110, of December 12, 2006), according to which priority is to establish measures mitigation
measures relating to the protection and conservation of marine biota;
Considering the proposals of the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation - ICMBio,
presented by the National Center for Research, Management and Conservation of Aquatic
Mammals - CMA and by the Directorate of Biodiversity Conservation - DIBIO, in the IBAMA
Process no. 02001.001375 / 2007-97, RESOLVE:
Art. 1 - Establish areas of permanent restriction and areas of periodic restriction for seismic data
acquisition activities of oil and gas exploration in priority areas for the conservation of aquatic
mammals on the Brazilian coast.
Paragraph 1 - The areas of permanent restriction are set out in Annex I of this Normative Instruction.
Paragraph 2 - The areas of periodic restriction, and respective periods, are set out in Annex II of this
Normative Instruction.
Art. 2º. IBAMA and ICMBio will periodically review this Normative Instruction within five years from
the date of publication, and may establish new areas and periods of permanent, temporary or
periodic restraint, as well as limit other activities related to the exploration and production of
oil and gas for the protection and conservation of aquatic mammals along the Brazilian coast.
Art. 3 - The petroleum blocks granted by the National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels
- ANP prior to the publication of this Instruction which are subject to the evaluation as to the
applicability of the restrictions provided in this instrument in the respective environmental
licensing processes, as well as to the fulfillment of conditions for mitigation and evaluation of
the impacts of the activities on the marine mammals.
Art. 4 - The penalties provided for in Decree No. 6,514, dated July 22, 2008, shall apply to violators
of this Normative Instruction, with amendments and additions to Decree No. 6,686, of
December 10, 2008, which regulate the Law No. 9,605, of February 12, 1998 - Law of
Environmental Crimes, without prejudice to other legal instruments applicable to the species.
Art. 5 - This Normative Instruction enters into force on the date of its publication.
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Marine Biota Monitoring Guidelines October/2018
CURT TRENNEPOHL
President of IBAMA
RÔMULO JOSÉ FERNANDES BARRETO MELLO
President of ICMBio
ANNEX I
The table below presents the specifications of the Permanent Restriction Areas,
whose locations were defined by Nautical Chart, issued by the Board of Hydrography
and Navigation - Navy of Brazil, in a compatible scale.
Species
Specifications
Trichechus manatus :
Until the depth
of 12 meters.
Pontoporia blainvillei :
Up to the 15
meters depth.
Until the depth of
30 meters.
Balaenoptera edeni :
ANNEX II
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The table below presents the specifications of the Periodic Restriction Areas, whose
locations have been defined by Nautical Chart, issued by the Board of Hydrography
and Navigation - Navy of Brazil, in a compatible scale.
Species
Periods
Areas
Specifications
Trichechus manatus :
September 1
through May 30
a) Coastal region of
the border between
Brazil and the French
Guyana to the city of
First Cross / MA;
b) Coastal region of
the municipality of
Aquiraz / CE up to
the state limit
Alagoas / Sergipe;
Until the depth
of 12 meters.
Megaptera novaeangliae :
July 1 through
November 30
Coastal region of
States of Sergipe,
Bahia and Espírito
Santo;
Up to the depth
of 500 meters.
Eubalaena australis :
June 1 through
December 31
Coastal region of the
municipality of Tijucas
/ SC (48º 36'37.52''W;
27º 17'22.63 ''S)
Balneário de Quintão,
municipality of
Palmares do Sul / RS
(30º 21'16.56 "S;
50º 16'17.759 W),
including the
Island of Santa
Catarina.
Up to 10 nautical
miles from the
coast and the
Island of Santa
Catarina.
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Marine Biota Monitoring Guidelines October/2018
ANNEX 3
Sea Turtles Areas of Restriction
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JOINT REGULATION INSTRUCTION IBAMA / ICMBIO N ° 1, of 05/27/2011.
THE PRESIDENT OF THE BRAZILIAN INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENT AND RENEWABLE
NATURAL RESOURCES - IBAMA, in the use of the attributions provided in art. 22, V,
Annex I of the Regimental Structure approved by Decree No. 6,099, of April 26, 2007,
and the CHICO MENDES INSTITUTE OF CONSERVATION OF BIODIVERSITY -
ICMBio, in the use of the powers conferred by Decree 6,100 of April 26, 2007 and by
Administrative Rule 532 / Civil House of July 30, 2008, published in the Official Gazette
of the Federal Government on July 31, 2008, and:
CONSIDERING the principles and guidelines for the conservation of biodiversity established
in the National Biodiversity Policy, established by Decree No. 4,339, dated August 22,
2002;
CONSIDERING that the five species of sea turtles occurring in Brazil are included in the
National List of Brazilian Fauna Species Threatened with Extinction, contained in
Normative Instruction of the Ministry of the Environment No. 003, dated 27th of May
2003;
CONSIDERING the precautionary principle and that oil and gas exploration and production
activities may have a negative impact on marine turtles;
CONSIDERING that CONAMA Resolution No. 10, dated October 24, 1996, provides that
environmental licensing on beaches where spawning of sea turtles occurs depends on
prior consent of the National Center for the Conservation and Management of Marine
Turtles - TAMAR Center - ICMBio;
CONSIDERING that IBAMA should define, by means of an administrative act, the areas and
periods of periodic, temporary or permanent restriction to the carrying out of seismic data
acquisition activities at sea and in transition zones, according to CONAMA Resolution
350, of July 6 of 2004;
CONSIDERING the recommendations of the Working Group on Oil and Gas Exploration and
Production Activities established by Decree No. 2110 of December 11, 2006, according
to which priority is to be given to establishing mitigating environmental measures related
to the protection and conservation of marine biota;
CONSIDERING the proposals of the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation -
ICMBio presented by the National Center for the Conservation and Management of
Marine Turtles - TAMAR and by the Directorate of Biodiversity Conservation - DIBIO,
in the IBAMA Process no. 02001.002309 / 2007-34; Solve:
Art. 1º - Establish periodic restriction areas for oil and gas exploration and production
activities, including seismic data collection, drilling of oil wells, installation or launching
of oil, gas and production water, installation of oil, gas and water production and marine
geotechnical drilling units, in priority areas for the conservation of sea turtles on the
Brazilian coast.
Art. 2º - The areas of periodic restriction foreseen in Annex I of this Normative Instruction,
denominated area 1, area 2, area 3 and area 4, are formed by polygons whose vertices
are established by the points of geographic coordinates.
§ - In areas 1, 2 and 3, the restriction period extends from October 1 to the last day of
February.
§ 2º - In area 4, the restriction period extends from December 1 to May 31.
§ 3º - The terrestrial limits of the areas of periodic restriction are located on the terrestrial limit
of the maritime edge, as defined by art. 23 of Decree 5.300, of December 7, 2004,
demarcated in the direction of the continent from the respective sea lines.
§ - The maritime limits of areas of periodic restriction for the activities of seismic data
collection and drilling of oil wells, are located at points located at 15 (fifteen) nautical
miles measured orthogonally to the coast towards the sea, from the respective land
limits.
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§ 5º - The maritime limits of the areas of periodic restriction for the activities of installation or
launching of marine geotechnical pipelines and pipelines, are located at points located
3 (three) nautical miles measured orthogonally to the coast towards the sea, from the
respective land limits.
Art. 3º - The oil blocks granted by the National Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Agency
(ANP) prior to the publication of this Normative Instruction and which overlap with the
Periodic Restriction Areas defined herein shall be subject to the assessment as to the
applicability of the restrictions provided in this instrument in the respective processes of
environmental licensing, as well as the fulfillment of conditions for mitigation and
evaluation of the impacts of the activities on sea turtles.
Art 4º - IBAMA and ICMBio shall periodically review this Normative Instruction within five years
from the date of publication, and may establish new areas and periods of periodic or
permanent restriction, as well as limit other activities related to exploration and
production of oil and gas, aiming at the protection and conservation of sea turtles along
the Brazilian coast.
Art 5º - The infractors of this Normative Instruction will be applied the penalties provided for in
Decree No. 6,514, dated July 22, 2008, with amendments and additions to Decree No.
6,686, dated December 10, 2008, which regulate Law No. 9,605, of February 12, 1998
- Law on Environmental Crimes, without prejudice to other legal instruments applicable
to the species.
Art. 6 - This Normative Instruction shall enter into force on the date of its publication.
CURT TRENNEPOHL
President of IBAMA
RÔMULO JOSÉ FERNANDES BARRETO MELLO
President of ICMBio
Annex I
Specifications of temporary restriction areas
The tables below show the coordinates of the vertices of the polygons that delimit each
of the Temporary Restriction Areas, defined in a geographic coordinate system and
SAD69 datum, generated from the Brazilian cartographic base - IBGE, at a scale of
1:1,000,000.
Area 1 from municipality of Macaé/RJ until Barra do Itabapoana (RJ/ES):
POINTS
LATITUDE
LONGITUDE
POLYGON 1
Macaé/RJ
22º 21' 50,43” S
41º 46’ 32,30” W
SOUTH LIMIT
Macaé/RJ ortogonal
3 milhas
22° 24' 29,42" S
41° 44' 46,40" W
Macaé/RJ ortogonal
15 milhas
22º 34’ 43,92” S
41º 37’ 56,95” W
Barra de
Itabapoana/RJ
21º 18' 18,96” S
40º 57’ 31,57” W
NORTH LIMIT
Barra de
Itapaboana/RJ
ortogonal 3 milhas
21º 18' 18,96” S
40º 54’ 12,41” W
Barra de
Itapaboana/RJ
ortogonal 15 milhas
21º 18’ 18,97” S
40º 41’ 21,08” W
36
Marine Biota Monitoring Guidelines October/2018
Area 2 From Barra do Riacho, municipality of Aracruz/ES until Barra do Una,
municipality of Una/BA:
POINTS
LATITUDE
LONGITUDE
POLYGON 2
Barra do Riacho/ES
19º 50' 19,70” S
40º 03’ 38,26” W
SOUTH LIMIT
Barra do Riacho/ES
ortogonal 3 milhas
19º 52' 33,19” S
40º 01’ 19,40” W
Barra do Riacho/ES
ortogonal 15 milhas
20º 01’ 08,03” S
39º 52’ 22,07” W
Barra do Una/BA
15º 13' 48,64” S
39º 00’ 00,44” W
NORTH LIMIT
Barra do Una/BA
ortogonal 3 milhas
15º 13' 48,59” S
38º 56’ 38,89” W
Barra do Una/BA
ortogonal 15 milhas
15º 13’ 48,61” S
38º 44’ 09,87” W
Area 3 from Ponta de Itapoá, municipality of Salvador/BA until Pontal do Peba,
municipality of Piaçabuçu/AL:
POINTS
LATITUDE
LONGITUDE
POLYGON 3
Ponta de Itapoã/BA
12º 56' 52,44’’ S
38º 22’ 17,76” W
SOUTH LIMIT
Ponta de Itapoã/BA -
ortogonal 3 milhas
12º 59' 35,03’’ S
38º 19’ 11,68” W
Ponta de Itapoã/BA -
ortogonal 15 milhas
13º 07’ 45,10” S
38º 09’ 50,58” W
Pontal do Peba/AL
10º 21' 31,66’’ S
36º 18’ 01,09” W
NORTH LIMIT
Pontal do Peba/AL -
ortogonal 3 milhas
10º 22' 23,51’’ S
36º 14’ 58,53” W
Pontal do Peba/AL -
ortogonal 15 milhas
10º 25’ 44,10” S
36º 03’ 17,45” W
Area 4 from Acaú, municipality of Pitimbú/PB until Ponta Negra, municipality of Natal/RN:
POINTS
LATITUDE
LONGITUDE
POLYGON 4
Acaú/PB
07º 32' 49,18’’ S
34º 49’ 44,58” W
SOUTH LIMIT
Acaú/PB - ortogonal
3 milhas
07º 32' 45,61’’ S
34º 47’ 06,91” W
Acaú/PB - ortogonal
15 milhas
07º 32' 00,96’’ S
34º 36’ 35,34” W
Ponta Negra/RN
05° 53' 05,45’’ S
35º 10’ 08,85” W
NORTH LIMIT
Ponta Negra/RN -
ortogonal 3 milhas
05° 51' 42,36’’ S
35º 06’ 32,64” W
Ponta Negra/RN -
ortogonal 15 milhas
05º 47’ 23,12” S
34º 55’ 17,48” W
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