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Shoreline Evolution along Uppada Coast

Authors:
  • Andhra Pradesh Space Applications Centre
  • Andhra Pradesh Space Applications Centre

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The coastline along Uppada region in Andhra Pradesh has been investigated. The shoreline was severely eroded due to near shore processes in last 2 to 3 decades. In 2010, geo-synthetic tube and bags were laid for about one kilometre along the Uppada coast in Andhra Pradesh in order to reduce and check the coastal erosion but it is found that the structural measures are not efficient enough to handle the issues. In 2016, it is observed that coastal erosion has again recaptured at the same stretch of shoreline. To understand the shoreline erosion phenomena, the analysis of shoreline changes for the past 29 years has been carried out to understand the coastal dynamics and its influence on the natural and man-made features. In the present study, Landsat- 5 ETM (1989), IRS-P6 LISS III (1999), IRS-P6 LISS III (2005, 2010), LISS IV (2012), Landsat- 8 ETM+ (2014, 2015) and Sentinel (2016, 2017, and 2018) satellite images were used for extracting the shoreline along the Uppada coast. The maps generated based on earliest available topographical maps have been compared with the maps generated based on the high resolution satellite data. The shoreline change detection is carried out using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS). The rate of shoreline change was assessed using Linear Regression (LRR) and End Point Rate (EPR) methods. In those methods End Point Rate (EPR) was calculated by dividing the distance of shoreline movement by the time elapsed between the earliest and latest measurements at each transect. The result indicates that there are series of coastal erosion along Uppada area and average 35.7meter per year has observed from the year of 1989 to 2018. In this study it is observed that after placing Geo synthetics tube, some places had accretion. The coastline was found to be eroding with average of 1.23 m/year.
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  • C H Fletcher
  • A B M Romine
  • M M Genz
  • M Barbee
  • T Dyer
  • S C R Anderson
  • Lim
  • Vitousek
  • G Gopinath
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Fletcher C.H., B M Romine, A S Genz, M M Barbee, M Dyer, T R Anderson, S C Lim, S Vitousek, Gopinath.G, Seralathan.P (2005) "Rapid erosion of the Coast of the Sagar Island, West Bengal India" Environmental Geology 48: 1058-1067.