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Fortnite and the Next Level Discourse: Understanding How Gamers Cultivate Pedagogy in Teacher Education

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Abstract

This paper describes a recent qualitative examination of the discourse and literacy practices generated by preservice teachers who played the video game, Fortnite. Following the observation, recording, and transcription of over 30 hours of Fortnite gaming streams, as well as the conduction of semi-structured interviews with six preservice teachers who served as focal participants, Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) was utilized in an attempt to understand how gamers used language and literacy practices to cultivate their developing pedagogies in digital spaces. Findings from the study show that Fortnite players employ a specialized vocabulary to become literate members of an interactive discourse community in which specific literacy practices indicate successful membership and participation in the game. Based on connections to reading comprehension and navigation within formal literacy learning, recommendations are made for future research, considering possible implementations of Fortnite in school-based settings. References Chilton, P. (2011). Critical discourse analysis. In P. Hogan (Ed.), The Cambridge encyclopedia of the language sciences. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
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Fortnite and the Next Level Discourse: Understanding How
Gamers Cultivate Pedagogy in Teacher Education
PROCEEDING
Rick Marlatt, New Mexico State University, United States
Society for Information Technology &
Teacher Education International
Conference, Mar 18, 2019 in Las Vegas,
NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-
37-7 Publisher: Association for the
Advancement of Computing in Education
(AACE), Chesapeake, VA
Abstract
Abstract
This paper describes a recent qualitative examination of the discourse and literacy practices
generated by preservice teachers who played the video game, Fortnite. Following the observation,
recording, and transcription of over 30 hours of Fortnite gaming streams, as well as the conduction
of semi-structured interviews with six preservice teachers who served as focal participants, Critical
Discourse Analysis (CDA) was utilized in an attempt to understand how gamers used language and
literacy practices to cultivate their developing pedagogies in digital spaces. Findings from the study
show that Fortnite players employ a specialized vocabulary to become literate members of an
interactive discourse community in which specific literacy practices indicate successful
membership and participation in the game. Based on connections to reading comprehension and
navigation within formal literacy learning, recommendations are made for future research,
considering possible implementations of Fortnite in school-based settings.
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Citation
Marlatt, R. (2019). Fortnite and the Next Level Discourse: Understanding How Gamers Cultivate
Pedagogy in Teacher Education. In K. Graziano (Ed.), Proceedings of Society for Information
Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (p. 1974). Las Vegas, NV, United States:
Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 15, 2019 from
https://www.learntechlib.org/primary/p/207917/.
© 2019 Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)
References
1. Chilton, P. (2011). Critical discourse analysis. In P. Hogan (Ed.), The Cambridge encyclopedia of
the language sciences. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
2. Foulger, T.S., Graziano, K.J., Schmidt-Crawford, D. & Slykhuis, D.A. (2017). Teacher Educator
Technology Competencies. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 25(4), 413-448.
Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology& Teacher Education. Retrieved from
https://www.learntechlib.org/p/181966/
3. Gee, J.P. (2007). What videogames have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York:
Palgrave Macmillan.
4. Gee, J.P. (2012). Social linguistics and literacies: Ideology in discourses. New York, NY:
Routledge.
5. Perry, K. (2012). What is literacy? A critical overview of sociocultural perspectives. Journal of
Language and Literacy Education 8(1), 50-71.
6. Warburton, T. (2016). Turning the lens: Reflexivity in research& Teaching with critical discourse
analysis. Critical Questions in Education, 7(3), 249-267.
These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references
above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.
Slides
$ 2019 SITE Presentation (1).pptx (Access with Subscription)
... The appeal of Fortnite appears contingent on the rich and rewarding social experience that it offers players such as Jax, intersections with YouTube and Twitch, along with the way the game acts as a vehicle for social capital and the performance of masculine identity (Carter et al. 2020). As Fortnite players improve their tier standing through skills development, they decipher new narratives for themselves by authoring authentic expressions of their personality, which ensures their participation in the community of practice along with their identity as rising experts in the game (Marlatt 2019), or identity development through textual interaction (Gee 2008). ...
... His daily engagement potentially promotes critical thinking and meta-skillslearning to learn as his perception, attention and cognition is focused on learning the strategy of the game (Bejjanki et al. 2014). As Jax creates content for his YouTube channel he blends digital expertise with related paratexts (Beavis et al. 2009;Marlatt 2019) to encapsulate the new literacy practices we have come to associate with meaning-making in the twenty-first century (Mills 2010(Mills , 2013Mills and Unsworth 2017). Together these findings provide new insights into links between gaming frequency, digital skills, and participatory cultures. ...
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This article addresses a gap in research about primary school boys’ identification as ‘gamers.’ Drawing on a survey of 318 Year 3 (7–8 years old) students, the research identified boys’ self-reported enjoyment for gaming, their frequency using digital devices, and their self-rated digital skills. Interviews with four boys from the survey also explored the lifeworlds of self-professed ‘gamers.’ Findings point to the salience of games for many boys’ emerging identities and the inter-related nature of their experiences. We argue that teachers can capitalise on the strength of video games to create ‘in-group’ cultures and communities of practice in their classrooms to support learning.
... As Gee (2003) argued, video games support many processes undertaken by learners at all ages and developmental stages, including comprehension and response, adaption, decisionmaking, critical thinking, and more. Video games can be meaningfully integrated into English language arts instruction for educators in their aims to promote student participation and interaction ; further, video games allow for students to engage in a variety of textual modes and positions as they construct knowledge and generate content through digital platforms and discourses (Marlatt, 2019). ...
... Granny), additional was data was sought through other means e.g. information provided on application stores and game streams on YouTube [22]. To ensure consistency and accuracy of the observations made by both researchers, the researchers met at the end of every day to discuss their observations, replay games where contradicting observations were made, and then record a final version of the data for the game. ...
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A player plays a game by sending messages into the game world using an interaction technique. These messages are then translated into actions performed on or by game objects towards achieving the game's objectives. A game's interaction model is the bridge between the player's interaction and its in-game actions by defining what the player may and may not act upon at any given moment. This makes the choice of interaction technique, its associated actions, and interaction model critical for designing games that are engaging, immersive, and intuitive to play. This paper presents a study focused on One-Touch-Gesture mobile games, with the aim of identifying the touch gestures used in popular games of this type, the types of in-game actions associated with these gestures, and the interaction models used by these games. The study was conducted by reviewing 77 of the most popular games in the last two years through playtesting by two researchers. The results of the study contribute to existing knowledge by providing an insight into the interactions and actions of popular 1TG games and providing a guide to aid in developing games of the type.
Article
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Open access to this article is available at https://www.learntechlib.org/p/181966/ The U.S. National Educational Technology Plan recommends the need to have a common set of technology competencies specifically for teacher educators who prepare teacher candidates to teach with technology (U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology, 2017). This study facilitated the co-creation of the Teacher Educator Technology Competencies (TETCs). The TETCs define the competencies (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) all teacher educators need in order to support teacher candidates as they prepare to become technology-using teachers. The TETCs shed light on the roles and responsibilities of teacher educators who address technology within their courses. A highly collabora-tive research approach was used to develop the TETCs which involved the crowdsourcing of technology-related literature, a Delphi method for expert feedback, and an open call for public comment. As a result, 12 competencies with related criteria were identified. The TETCs should be viewed as a first step in a larger reform effort to better address technology integration in teacher preparation programs. The release of the TETCs provides future research opportunities including, but not limited to, implications for course design, relevant faculty development for teacher educators, and policy implications.
Article
Full-text available
Sociocultural perspectives on literacy include various theories focused on the myriad ways in which people use literacy in context, which include a strong emphasis on power relations. Yet, these theories also have important differences, and many in the field of literacy do not clearly differentiate among them. I provide a critical overview of influential sociocultural perspectives on literacy, focusing on three major perspectives: (1) literacy as social practice, (2) multiliteracies, and (3) critical literacy. In an effort to support researchers in framing their scholarly work and to support practitioners and other consumers of research make sense of research, I discuss the ways in which each theory would answer the question, “What is literacy?” as well as the affordances and limitations of these theories in terms of literacy development, literacy use, and literacy instruction.
The Cambridge encyclopedia of the language sciences
  • P Chilton
Chilton, P. (2011). Critical discourse analysis. In P. Hogan (Ed.), The Cambridge encyclopedia of the language sciences. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Turning the lens: Reflexivity in research& Teaching with critical discourse analysis
  • T Warburton
Warburton, T. (2016). Turning the lens: Reflexivity in research& Teaching with critical discourse analysis. Critical Questions in Education, 7(3), 249-267.
Society for Information Technology& Teacher Education
  • N C Waynesville
  • Usa
Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology& Teacher Education. Retrieved from https://www.learntechlib.org/p/181966/