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Proceedings of the CHI'19 Workshop: Addressing the Challenges of Situationally-Induced Impairments and Disabilities in Mobile Interaction

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The workshop paper can be downloaded from here https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3299029 and the proceedings for the workshop can be found here https://arxiv.org/html/1904.05382
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Proceedings+of+the+CHI'19+Workshop:+Addressing+the+
Challenges+of+Situationally-Induced+Impairments+and+
Disabilities+in+Mobile+Interaction+
This%volume%includes%the%proceedings%of%the%2019%ACM%CHI%Conference%on%Human%Factors%
in%Computing%Systems%(CHI'19)%Workshop:%Addressing%the%Challenges%of%Situationally-
Induced%Impairments%and%Disabilities%in%Mobile%Interaction,%held%on%Sunday%May%5th.%
Workshop%Organisers:%Garreth%W.%Tigwell,%Zhanna%Sarsenbayeva,%Benjamin%M.%Gorman,%
David%R.%Flatla,%Jorge%Goncalves,%Yeliz%Yesilada,%and%Jacob%O.%Wobbrock.%
Accepted+workshop+proposal:+https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3299029+
The%accepted%workshop%proposal%outlines%the%previous%work%investigating%Situationally-
Induced%Impairments%and%Disabilities%(SIIDs),%the%workshop%structure,%and%the%workshop%
goals.+
Below%is%a%list%of%the%accepted%papers%to%the%workshops%including%a%link%to%each%work:%
Conveying+Situational+Information+to+People+with+Visual+Impairments%
Tousif%Ahmed,%Rakibul%Hasan,%Kay%Connelly,%David%Crandall,%Apu%Kapadia%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06117)%
+
Ability+and+Context+Based+Adaptive+System:+A+Proposal+for+Machine+Learning+
Approach%
Elgin%Akpınar,%Yeliz%Yeşilada,%Selim%Temizer%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06118)%
+
Expressive+Haptics+for+Enhanced+Usability+of+Mobile+Interfaces+in+Situations+of+
Impairments%
Tigmanshu%Bhatnagar,%Youngjun%Cho,%Nicolai%Marquardt,%Catherine%Holloway%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06119)%
+
Method+Cards+for+Designing+for+Situational+Impairment%
Nayeri%Jacobo%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06120)%
+
AirPen:+A+Touchless+Fingertip+Based+Gestural+Interface+for+Smartphones+and+
Head-Mounted+Devices%
Varun%Jain,%Ramya%Hebbalaguppe%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06122)%
+
An+Ethnographic+Study+of+Visual+Impairments+for+Voice+User+Interface+Design%
Gisela%Reyes-Cruz,%Joel%Fischer,%Stuart%Reeves%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06123)%
+
+
+
Situationally-Induced+Impairments+and+Disabilities+Research%
Zhanna%Sarsenbayeva,%Vassilis%Kostakos,%Jorge%Goncalves%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06128)%
+
Designing+Mobile+Interaction+Guidelines+to+Account+for+Situationally+Induced+
Impairments+and+Disabilities+(SIID)+and+Severely+Constraining+Situational+
Impairments+(SCSI)%
Sidas%Saulynas,%Ravi%Kuber%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06129)%
+
Situationally+Induced+Impairment+in+Navigation+Support+for+Runners%
Shreepriya%Shreepriya,%Danilo%Gallo,%Sruthi%Viswanathan,%Jutta%Willamowski%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06131)%
+
Looking+at+Situationally-Induced+Impairments+and+Disabilities+(SIIDs)+with+
People+with+Cognitive+Brain+Injury%
Osian%Smith,%Stephen%Lindsay%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06132)%
+
Universal+Design+and+Adaptive+Interfaces+as+a+Strategy+for+Induced+Disabilities%
Aaron%Steinfeld,%John%Zimmerman,%Anthony%Tomasic%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06134)%
+
The+Development+and+Evaluation+of+the+SmartAbility+Android+Application+to+
Detect+Users'+Abilities%
Paul%Whittington,%Huseyin%Dogan,%Nan%Jiang,%Keith%Phalp%
(https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.06138)%
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
With the growing popularity of mobile devices, Situational Visual Impairments (SVIs) can cause accessibility challenges. When addressing SVIs, interface and content designers are lacking guidelines based on empirically-determined SVI con­ trast sensitivities. To address this, we developed BrightLights-a game that collects screen-content-contrast data in-the-wild that will enable new SVI-pertinent contrast ratio recommen­ dations. In our evaluation with 15 participants, we found significantly worse performance with low screen brightness versus medium or high screen brightness, showing that Bright-Lights is sensitive to at least one factor that contributes to SVI (screen brightness). Once validated for in-the-wild deploy­ ment, BrightLights data will finally help designers address SVIs through their designs.
Conference Paper
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Mobile technologies are used in increasingly diverse and challenging environments. With the predominantly visual nature of mobile devices, Situational Visual Impairments (SVIs) are a growing concern. However, fundamental knowledge is lacking about the causes of SVIs, how people deal with SVIs, and whether their solutions are effective. To address this, we first conducted a convenience-sampled online questionnaire with 174 participants, and identified many causes and (ineffective) solutions. To firmly ground our initial results, we then conducted a two-week ecological momentary assessment with 24 participants, balanced by age and gender across Australia and Scotland. We confirmed that SVIs are experienced often and during typical mobile tasks, and can be very frustrating. We identify a range of factors causing SVIs, discuss mobile design implications, and introduce an SVI Context Model rooted in empirical evidence. The contributions in this paper will support the development of new effective SVI solutions.
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By focusing on users' abilities rather than disabilities, designers can create interactive systems better matched to those abilities.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Mobile devices are a substantial part of our lives, supporting communication, work, and play. However, situational visual impairments (SVIs) can make completing tasks a challenge (e.g., browsing online in bright sunlight) and poorly designed content can cause or exacerbate SVIs. We surveyed 43 mobile content designers and ran four follow-on interviews to understand what designers currently do regarding SVIs, what resources they know of, and what is required to best support them in designing to reduce SVIs. Our findings highlight key similarities and differences between accessibility and designing to reduce SVIs. Our participants requested improved guidelines, education, and digital design tools for SVIs. To accommodate the growing number of people affected by SVIs and improve the inclusion of accessibility in design, we introduce recommendations that leverage the overlap between accessibility and SVIs to minimise the effort required in extending current design processes.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A subset of "Situationally Induced Impairments and Disabilities" (SIID), termed "Severely Constraining Situational Impairments" (SCSI), was explored at the user task and motivational level, to better understand the challenges faced by users attempting to perform tasks using a mobile device. Through structured interviews, participants were found to deploy workarounds in attempting to complete mobile I/O transactions, even if that workaround might place them in considerable danger. The motivations underlying user decisions were also explored resulting in a set of rich scenarios which will be used in the final participatory design stage of the study to discover ways that technology can be designed to overcome SCSIs.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
User interaction with mobile devices can be negatively affected by contextual factors, known as situationally-induced impairments. In this paper, we provide a systematic overview of established situational impairments and their impact on interaction with mobile devices, as well as existing methods for their detection and design guidelines to overcome them. We also propose a research roadmap for this topic where we argue that more experiments are required regarding the less investigated situational impairments. Furthermore, we argue that successful detection of the presence of a specific situational impairment is paramount before solutions can be proposed to adapt mobile interfaces to accommodate potential situational impairments. 1
Article
Full-text available
Previous work has highlighted the detrimental effect of cold ambience on fine-motor skills during interaction with mobile devices. In this work, we develop a method to infer changes in finger temperature of smartphone users without the need for specialised hardware. Specifically, we demonstrate that smartphone battery temperature is a reliable gauge for determining changes to finger temperature. In addition, we show that the behaviour of smartphone battery temperature in cold settings is consistent across different smartphone models and battery configurations. Our method can be used to determine cold-induced situational impairments, and trigger interface adaptations during mobile interaction.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
At least 360 million people worldwide have disabling hearing loss that frequently causes difficulties in day-today conversations. Traditional technology (e.g., hearing aids) often fails to offer enough value, has low adoption rates, and can result in social stigma. Speechreading can dramatically improve conversational understanding, but speechreading is a skill that can be challenging to learn. To address this, we developed a novel speechreading acquisition framework that can be used to design Speechreading Acquisition Tools (SATs) – a new type of technology to improve speechreading acquisition. We interviewed seven speechreading tutors and used thematic analysis to identify and organise the key elements of our framework. We then evaluated our framework by using it to: 1) categorise every tutor-identified speechreading teaching technique, 2) critically evaluate existing conversational aids, and 3) design three new SATs. Through the use of SATs designed using our framework, the speechreading abilities of people with hearing loss around the world should be enhanced, thereby improving the conversational foundation of their day-today lives.
Conference Paper
Modern smartphones are built with capacitive-sensing touchscreens, which can detect anything that is conductive or has a dielectric differential with air. The human finger is an example of such a dielectric, and works wonderfully with such touchscreens. However, touch interactions are disrupted by raindrops, water smear, and wet fingers because capacitive touchscreens cannot distinguish finger touches from other conductive materials. When users' screens get wet, the screen's usability is significantly reduced. RainCheck addresses this hazard by filtering out potential touch points caused by water to differentiate fingertips from raindrops and water smear, adapting in real-time to restore successful interaction to the user. Specifically, RainCheck uses the low-level raw sensor data from touchscreen drivers and employs precise selection techniques to resolve water-fingertip ambiguity. Our study shows that RainCheck improves gesture accuracy by 75.7%, touch accuracy by 47.9%, and target selection time by 80.0%, making it a successful remedy to interference caused by rain and other water.
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Colour can convey a mood or elicit a particular emotion and, in terms of web design, colour can influence attitudes, perceptions, and behaviours. However, many websites demonstrate inaccessible colour choices. Numerous online colour palette design tools only focus on assisting designers with either the aesthetics or accessibility of colours.With a user-centered design approach, we developed the Accessible Colour Evaluator (ACE, daprlab.com/ace) which enhances web developers' and designers' ability to balance aesthetic and accessibility constraints. We distributed an online questionnaire to 28 web developers and designers to understand their attitudes and utilisation of accessibility guidelines, as well as to gather initial design requirements for ACE. With this information, we created three low-fidelity paper prototypes that were used to create two high-fidelity prototypes. The high-fidelity prototypes were discussed with 4 web developers and designers during a design workshop, and their feedback was used to develop the final version of ACE. A comparative evaluation of ACE and three existing alternative tools was conducted with 10 new web developers and designers. All participants were able to complete a colour palette design task when using ACE and identified ACE as their most preferred tool. The mean scores for the six TLX measures show ACE as providing the best performance and causing the lowest frustration. Finally, we conducted a small focus group with 3 web developers and designers to gather qualitative feedback about ACE. Participants identified a number of ACE's strengths and made suggestions for future extensions and improvements. 2017