Article

Development of Pictorial Vocational Interest Inventory for Adolescents

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Abstract

Introduction. This study aimed to develop Pictorial Vocational Interest Inventory (PVII), a vocational interest inventory for adolescents presented in the form of picture pairs, specially developed to represent the Holland’s RIASEC characteristics.Method. To obtain the evidence of test content, 31 experts judge the suitability of the PVII’s items with the theory. Items with high Aiken’s V index were selected and tested to the adolescents. The respondents for PVII’s testing were 826 High School students. The item analysis of PVII was performed for each interest type to select items with the corrected item-total correlation coefficient .30 or higher. Internal consistency and test-retest procedure were applied to get the reliability coefficients of the PVII. The construct validity for each type of interest was analyzed using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA).Results. Based on Aiken's V index of .80 or higher, 24 items were selected each with corrected item-total correlation coefficients ranging from .308 to .684. Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients ranged from .600 to .788, while the test-retest reliability ranged from .707 to .820. The result of CFA showed that the factor loadings of the PVII’s items ranged from .403 to .820; all of the factor loadings were significant at p< .01.Conclusion. The findings of this study provide psychometrics support of the PVII as an adequate instrument to assess vocational interest in adolescents.

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... To address the influence of gender stereotypes and the physical attractiveness of the model, the items of the Iconographic Professional Interest Inventory (3IP; Boerchi & Magnano, 2015) present professions as simple drawings without notable gender or facial expressions. The Pictorial Vocational Interest Inventory (PVII; Nurcahyo et al., 2019) also follows a drawing approach, but instead of a comprehensive presentation of a profession, it depicts concrete job-related activities. The Pictorial and Descriptive Interest Inventory (PDII; Šverko et al., 2014) presents labelled photographs of vocations together with a brief description. ...
... Authors who have chosen the photographs of the PDII (Šverko et al., 2014) and the F-I-T (Stoll et al., 2012) have paid considerable attention to a realistic and comprehensive presentation of professions, which makes it difficult to identify the significant activity or object. Therefore, Nurcahyo et al. (2019) recommend reducing complexity by presenting one activity of a profession per item. ...
... While the F-I-T (Stoll et al., 2012) gives a comprehensive impression of a profession per item, the NVIS aims to reduce complexity by focusing on one activity per item. In contrast to the PVII (Nurcahyo et al., 2019), which uses digital drawing pictures, the NVIS consists of photographs to provide the most realistic form of presentation. ...
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... These two fundamental elements cannot be separated from each other in the development of a good instrument. Several studies have been conducted to test the construct validity using CFA as in the CPSI instrumen instrument (Fu & Zhang, 42 | Jurnal Kajian Bimbingan dan Konseling, 7(1), 2022, 36-44 2019, ISEC (Meens et al., 2019), SKI (Rahman, 2019) and PVII (Nurcahyo et al., 2019). These studies show the importance of construct validity as an evaluation material for the instruments that have been developed. ...
... Another instrument model developed by Nurcahyo, et al. (2019) interesting to observe. The instrument was developed using Holland's theory, where the instrument items were converted into image stimuli. ...
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Psychometrics and measurement are important for all aspects of psychological research and especially so in social/personality psychology. This volume provides conceptual and practical foundations in scale construction and psychometrics for producers and consumers of social and personality research. It covers basic principles, practices, and processes in scale construction, scale evaluation, scale use and interpretation of research results in the context of psychological measurement. It explains fundamental concepts and methods related to dimensionality, reliability, and validity. In addition, it provides relatively non-technical introductions to special topics and advanced psychometric perspectives such as Confirmatory Factor Analysis, Generalizability Theory, and Item Response Theory. Social/personality research is often grounded in effective measurement, but poor measurement can and does compromise the meaningfulness of psychological research. This volume is intended to raise awareness and understanding of issues that will enhance even further the generally good conduct and interpretation of research in social and personality psychology. This text will be perfect for all advanced students and researchers in social and personality psychology using psychometrics or measurement as part of their studies or research.
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To explore the structure of vocational interests in Serbia, 1063 participants of various age, education and gender completed the Serbian version of the Personal Globe Inventory [PGI, Tracey, T. (2002). Personal Globe Inventory: Measurement of the spherical model of interests and competence beliefs. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 6, 113–172]. The fit of Tracey’s octagonal and spherical models to the structure of correlations between Tracey’s eight and 18 type scales was evaluated, as was the fit of Holland’s hexagonal, Gati’s, Rounds–Tracey’s and Liu–Rounds’ models to the structure of correlations between RIASEC scales. Randomization test of hypothetical orders, multidimensional scaling with fixed coordinates and Myors’ test were used to assess the fit of models to the data. The results showed good fit of Tracey’s octagonal and spherical models to the data. Holland’s hexagonal model also fit the data very well, but the fit of Gati’s, Rounds–Tracey’s and Liu–Rounds’ models of relations between RIASEC types was either nonsignificant or very low.
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A sample of 307 Irish high school students completed a modified version of the Personal Globe Inventory (PGI, Tracey, 2002). Results of separate principal components analyses demonstrated the presence of three substantive factors: People/Things, Data/Ideas, and Prestige, similar to the structure of the PGI in US samples (Tracey, 2002). The fit of Holland’s six-type RIASEC, the PGI eight-type model, and the PGI spherical structure to the data were examined using the randomized test of hypothesized order relations. The results demonstrated that each model fit the Irish data well. No structural differences were found between gender groups. The results support the structural validity of the modified PGI in an Irish context.
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The cross-cultural generalizability of vocational interest structures has received significant attention in recent years. This article adds to this research in four respects. First, data from a context that has not previously been investigated (Germany) was analyzed. Second, students at different stages of their educational career were examined. Third, the interest structure in male and females was compared. Fourth, two methods—the randomization test of hypothesized order relations (RTOR) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)—were applied to three competing structural conceptions: Holland’s circular representation, Gati’s hierarchical model, and Rounds and Tracey’s alternative hierarchical model. RTOR supported all three representations, whereas CFA supported only Holland’s model. CFAs indicated that the interest structure is reasonably invariant between high school and university students, but that the configurations for high school females and males differ. Substantive and methodological implications are discussed.
Article
Cronbach's a is the most widely used index of the reliability of a scale. However, its use and interpretation can be subject to a number of errors. This article discusses the historical development of a from other indexes of internal consistency (split-half reliability and Kuder-Richardson 20) and discusses four myths associated with a: (a) that it is a fixed property of the scale, (b) that it measures only the internal consistency of the scale, (c) that higher values are always preferred over lower ones, and (d) that it is restricted to the range of 0 to 1. It provides some recommendations for acceptable values of a in different situations.
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