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Evaluation of bioactive compounds from Jasminum polyanthum and its medicinal properties

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  • Centre for Bioscience and nanoscience research
  • Centre for Bioscience and Nanoscience Research (affiliated to Bharathiar University)

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Jasmine plant species are widely grown in Asia and used for religious offering, is known to have wide range of bioactive compounds and its properties. Most of the jasmine species have been evaluated its bioactive properties and found positive results. This work consists of evaluating bioactive properties of jasmine species, Jasminum polyanthum and finding its potential medicinal uses. The plant leaves and flowers were powdered and added water to prepare extract. Both leaves and flower extract was evaluated for phytochemical compounds, anti oxidant, anti diabetic, anti inflammatory, anti microbial, anti cancer and DNA nicking assay. The leaf and flower extract contained most of the phytochemical compounds which leads to presence of various bioactive properties. Leaf possesses good DPPH activity, while flower possess high phenol content and FRAP activity. Leaf possesses good anti diabetic activity, while flower possess good anti inflammatory activity. Flower extract consists of higher antibacterial activity than leaf, while in antifungal it is vice versa. Keywords: Anti-diabetic, Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant activity, MTT Assay, DNA Nicking study
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Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [303] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Available online on 15.03.2019 at http://jddtonline.info
Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics
Open Access to Pharmaceutical and Medical Research
© 2011-18, publisher and licensee JDDT, This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted
non-commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited
Open Access Research Article
Evaluation of bioactive compounds from Jasminum polyanthum and its
medicinal properties
1* Jaya Prakkash M.A., 2 R. Ragunathan and 2 Jesteena Johney
1 School of chemical and biotechnology, Sastra Deemed University, Thanjavur 613 401, India
2. Department of Biotechnology, Centre for Bioscience and Nanoscience Research, Eachanari, Coimbatore 21 India
ABSTRACT
Jasmine plant species are widely grown in Asia and used for religious offering, is known to have wide range of bioactive compounds and its
properties. Most of the jasmine species have been evaluated its bioactive properties and found positive results. This work consists of evaluating
bioactive properties of jasmine species, Jasminum polyanthum and finding its potential medicinal uses. The plant leaves and flowers were
powdered and added water to prepare extract. Both leaves and flower extract was evaluated for phytochemical compounds, anti oxidant, anti
diabetic, anti inflammatory, anti microbial, anti cancer and DNA nicking assay. The leaf and flower extract contained most of the phytochemical
compounds which leads to presence of various bioactive properties. Leaf possesses good DPPH activity, while flower possess high phenol
content and FRAP activity. Leaf possesses good anti diabetic activity, while flower possess good anti inflammatory activity. Flower extract
consists of higher antibacterial activity than leaf, while in antifungal it is vice versa.
Keywords: Anti-diabetic, Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant activity, MTT Assay, DNA Nicking study
Article Info: Received 31 Jan 2019; Review Completed 07 March 2019; Accepted 09 March 2019; Available online 15 March 2019
Cite this article as:
Jaya Prakkash MA, Ragunathan R, Jesteena J, Evaluation of bioactive compounds from Jasminum polyanthum and its
medicinal properties , Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
http://dx.doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i2.2413
*Address for Correspondence:
Jaya Prakkash M.A., School of chemical and biotechnology, Sastra Deemed University, Thanjavur 613 401,
INTRODUCTION
Advances in technology proved to be advantageous to
mankind. At the same time, number of diseases also
increased. Even though human invented drugs for cure, later
it was inferred that those drugs are ineffective in killing
pathogens as they developed tolerance1. Some of those drugs
also caused side effects. From olden days, plants were used
for treating various disorders. The ancient medicine like
Ayurveda and siddha mostly involve plant as curative
substances. Medicinal plants have chemical components
which produce physiological actions in body like elimination
of ROS (anti oxidant), inhibiting enzymes which increase
blood glucose level (anti diabetic), inhibiting inflammatory
action (anti inflammatory), killing pathogens (anti
microbial), inhibiting cell proliferation (anti cancer) etc. So
there is a need to explore bioactive compounds in plants as
they contribute to medicinal properties and find usage in
treating human diseases. These components form class of
phytochemicals like alkaloids, steroids, saponin, flavonoids
etc2. If higher level of any bioactive property was found, then
it can be used for applications to treat against human
physiological diseases provided it does not cause any side
effects.
Jasmine flowers are widely distributed and each species has
its own native (mostly Asia). There are about 200 species
existing in the world. Its fragrance is well known and so it is
popular. These are cultivated in garden and also grown as
house plant. It grows on sunny areas and soil must be fertile,
well drained. Jasmine species flowers are used for religious
purposes like offerings to Hindu gods3. Almost all jasmine
species are ingredient for Ayurvedic species having curing
qualities. It is used for removing intestinal worms. It is
widely used for venereal diseases. Flowers are used to treat
ulcers, vesicles, boils, skin diseases and eye disorders. Leaf
extract are effective against breast tumours4, aphthous,
stomatitis, tootache, ulceration in mouth, throat and gums.
Traditionally, its leaves were grind into juice and treated for
urinary tract infections as sedative, mild anaesthetic and
astringent. Jasmine species also finds place in cosmetics and
used for making perfumes and scents. Flowers are used for
skin toner and conditioner and used in shampoos, soaps,
creams etc. Flowers were used as folk remedy for hepatitis,
stomatitis, and duodenitis in china5, Jasmine flowers are also
used for decorative purpose. Oils extracted from flowers are
widely used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry6. In
some parts of the world, jasmine tea is consumed for
boosting immunity.
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [304] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Jasminum polyanthum, also known as pink jasmine, is an fast
growing evergreen creeper. Its native is china and hence also
called Chinese jasmine. It produces pinkish white flower
buds in early spring, followed by 5 petalled flowers (white
and pink mixed) which are 2 cm in diameter7. It develops
into dense bush and produces fragrance wherever it is
present. Since it grows extremely fast, It also acts as invasive
species in some countries. It is propagated through seeds,
suckers, and stem cuttings. It grows in moist, fertile, well
drained soils and tolerates wide range of pH. It grows well in
subtropical climate. . It is widely used in landscape design
and used to cover high walls and Fences.
In this paper, extract of Jasminum polyanthum leaves and
flowers were prepared and evaluated its composition of
bioactive compounds, anti oxidant, anti diabetic, anti
inflammatory, antimicrobial against urinary tract infection,
anti cancer and DNA nicking assay. These activities were
compared between leaf and flower extracts and inferred
which one is best among those medicinal properties.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
Preparation of plant extract
Fresh flowers and leaves of Jasminum polyanthum were
collected from nearby regions of Coimbatore, Tamilnadu,
India. Leaves and flowers were dried under shade of sunlight
for 48 hours. The dried leaves and flowers were grinded and
powder were stored in air tight container and used for the
further studies.
2gm of the powdered sample was dissolved in water and
methanol, incubated at 40ºC, 70-80 rpm for 24 hours. Then
the solution was filtered through filter paper and these
extracts were further analysed.
Qualitative Analysis of Bioactive Compounds8
The four extracts (leaf water, leaf methanol, flower water
and flower methanol) were evaluated for qualitative
bioactive compounds of alkaloids (mayer’s test), terpenoids
(concentrated sulphuric acid), phenol (FeCl3 test), sugar
(Fehling’s test), saponin (Foam test), flavonoids
(concentrated HCl), quinines (NaOH test), protein and
steroid (chloroform and Sulphuric acid).
Anti oxidant activity
DPPH Assay
Leaf and flower powder of different concentrations (10-30
mg) were taken in different test tube and 0.1ml of 0.1M
DPPH solution was added and mixed well. After 5 minutes of
incubation 0.4ml of 50 mM Tris HCl was added and make up
to 2ml with distilled water and incubated in dark room for
30 minutes. OD reading was taken at 517 nm using
spectrophotometer. Ascorbic acid was used as a standard to
calculate the mg/g of DPPH.
Flavonoids
1ml of the leaf and flower extract was taken separately and
added 0.1ml of 10% AlCl3. 0.1ml of 1M potassium acetate,
2.ml of distilled water also added and incubated at room
temperature for 30 minutes. OD measurement were taken at
415 nm using Spectrophotometer. Quercetin was used as a
standard to calculate the mg/g of flavonoids.
Total phenol
0.5ml of the extract was mixed with 0.5ml of folin’s phenol
reagent (10%), 2ml of 20% sodium carbonate solution, after
adding all the reagent the tubes were incubated at 45ºC for
45 minutes. OD were measured at 765 nm using
Spectrophotometer. Gallic acid was used as a standard and
its standard curve plotted.
FRAP assay
Radical scavenging activity was measured by dissolving 1ml
of the sample with equal amount of Phosphate buffer
solution and 0.1% potassium ferric cyanide solution. After
adding the tubes were incubated at 50ºC for 20 minutes. 1
ml of the10% TCA solution, 1ml of the distilled water and
0.1% FeCl3 solution was also added to the sample and OD
reading was taken at 700 nm using Spectrophotometer.
Ascorbic acid was taken as standard to calculate the mg/g of
the FRAP content.
Anti Diabetic Activity
α- Amylase activity 9
1ml of the sample was mixed with 0.1% starch solution in
16mM of sodium acetate buffer and 0.2 ml of the alpha
amylase enzyme which is prepared by mixing of 27.5gm in
100ml distilled water. The colorimetric reagent was
prepared by mixing sodium potassium tartarate and 3,5 di
nitro salicylic acid solution in the concentration of 96mM.
After adding, the tubes were incubated in alkaline condition
at 250C for 3-5minutes. The generation of maltose was
quantified by the reduction of 3,5di nitrosalicylic acid to 3-
amino-5-nitrosalicylic acid. This was detected at 540nm
using spectrophotometer. The % of alpha amylase inhibitory
activity was calculated by using the following formula;
Percentage of inhibition = 
 ×
100
α - Glucosidase activity10
The inhibitory activity was determined by mixing of 1ml of
2% starch solution and 1ml of the sample with 1ml of the
0.2M tris buffer (pH-8), incubated at 370C for 5minutes. The
reaction was initiated by adding 1ml of the alpha-glucosidase
enzyme (1U/ml) incubated for 40minutes at 350C. The
reaction was terminated by adding 2ml of 6N HCl and the
reading was measured by 540nm using spectrophotometer.
The % of alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity was calculated
by using the following formula;
Percentage of inhibition = 
 ×
100
Anti Inflammatory Activity
Anti proteinase action11
0.06mg of trypsin was added to 1ml of the sample with 1ml
of 20 mM Tris HCl solution. The mixture was incubated for
10 minutes at 37ºC. 1ml of the 0.8% casein solution was
added and incubated for 20 minutes. Followed by added 2ml
of 70% perchloric acid to arrest the reaction. Cloudy
suspension was centrifuged at 5000 rpm for 5 minutes and
supernatant was collected, OD reading were taken at 210 nm
using Spectrophotometer and tris HCl was used as a blank.
Inflammatory inhibitory activity was found using following
formula;
Percentage of inhibition = 
 ×
100
Antimicrobial Activity12
Agar well diffusion method
Well diffusion method was used to evaluate anti-microbial
activity. Mueller Hinton agar media was used for
antibacterial study. 39gm of media was dissolved in 1000ml
of distilled water and sterilised for 121ºC at 15lbs. The
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [305] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
media was poured into sterile petri plates and 70µl of
bacteria were swabbed. The samples were evaluated for
antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella
pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas
aeruginosa. Gentamicin was used as a positive control and
sterile distilled water was taken as negative control. Wells
were loaded with extracts and incubated at 370C for 24
hours. After incubation zone of inhibition was measured.
Antifungal activity
Malt extract media was used for anti-fungal study. 38gm of
malt extract agar media was dissolved in 1000ml of distilled
water and sterilised. The media was poured into sterile Petri
plates. 70µl of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were
swabbed on to the plate and wells were loaded with leaf and
flower extracts. Petri plates were sealed tightly and kept
aside at 300C for 3 -5 days. After incubation zone of
inhibition was measured.
Anticancer Activity13
Preparation of cell lines media
DMEM media (19.75 g of DMEM, 3.7g of sodium carbonate,
4.5g of glucose) was prepared in T- flask and the addition of
HeLa cell lines the flask was incubated in CO2 incubator with
5% CO2, 37ºC temperature, at 70-80% of humidity for 24-
72hrs.
In vitro cytotoxicity Assay
Leaf and flower extracts of different concentration (10µl,
20µl, 30µl) were taken and to that 100µl of cell lines were
added. DMSO was taken as blank and cell lines were used as
a control. The plate was incubated for 24 hours in CO2
incubator. DMSO and trypsin was used to lysis the cells and
also for the washing. After washing 20µl MTT dye was added
to all the wells and incubated for 24 hours. OD values were
measured using ELISA reader (Robonic read well touch
ELISA plate reader). Percentage of cell death was calculated
using the following formula;
Percentage of cell death = 
 ×100
DNA Nicking Assay14
DNA nicking assay was done to find the presence of DNA
damaging property of extracts using Fenton’s method (30
mM Hydrogen peroxide, 80 mM FeCl3 solution, 50mM
Ascorbic acid). 3µl of pBR322 plasmid DNA was mixed with
10µl of the Fenton’s reagent, 5µl of the sample and make up
to 20 µl with distilled water to evaluate DNA damage. The
tubes were incubated 370C for 2-3 hours and runned at 1%
agarose gel. While preparing the agarose 2µl of ethidium
bromide was added to visualise the DNA under UV-
Transilluminator. Samples were loaded with the dye of
bromophenol blue and run at 50 millivolts along with
pBR322 as a control DNA.
RESULTS
Bioactive Compound Analysis
The analyses of bioactive compounds in four extracts leaf
water, leaf methanol, flower water, flower methanol are
given in table 1. Leaf and flower extracts containing water
has most of bioactive compounds and hence these two
extracts are taken for further study.
Figure 1: Jasminum polyanthum plant
Table 1: Composition of bioactive compounds in different extracts
Compounds
Flower water
Leaf water
Flower methanol
Leaf methanol
Alkaloids
Present
Present
Present
Absent
Terpenoids
Absent
Present
Present
Absent
Phenol
Present
Present
Present
Present
Sugar
Absent
Present
Absent
Present
Saponin
Present
Present
Absent
Present
Flavonoids
Present
Absent
Present
Absent
Quinines
Present
Present
Present
Present
Protein
Present
Present
Present
Absent
Steroid
Absent
Absent
Present
Absent
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [306] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Flower water extract
Leaf water extract
Flower methanol extract
Leaf methanol extract
Figure 3: Results of bioactive compound analysis of 4 extracts flower water, leaf water, flower methanol, leaf
methanol. Analysis were done for following type of compounds (from the left) alkaloid, terpenoid, phenol, sugar,
saponin, flavonoid, quinine, protein, steroids.
Antioxidant Activity
DPPH assay
DPPH radical scavenging activity study is extensively using
to screen the antioxidant properties of the sample. In this
study the antioxidant concentration from plant powder were
determined from ascorbic acid standard curve given in table
2. From the curve, leaf powder has higher antioxidant.
Antioxidant concentration in leaf and flower is in range of 6
to 19mg/g and 11 to 36 mg/g respectively.
Flavonoids
Flavonoids are well famous for their antioxidant properties
and it is a universal plant pigment. Flavonoids content were
calculated by using quercetin as standard shown in table 3.
Flower extract has higher flavonoid content than leaf.
Flavonoid concentration in leaf and flower are 30 and 19
mg/g respectively.
Total phenol
Phenolic constituents are important in plants because of
scavenging activity due to the hydroxyl group. Total phenol
concentrations were determined from standard curve using
gallic acid as standard shown in table 4. Flower extract has
slightly high phenol content than leaf. Total phenol content
in leaf and flower are 5 and 7mg/g respectively.
FRAP assay
Reducing power of an antioxidant reacting with the ferric
cyanide was calculated with the standard ascorbic acid. From
the study flower extract has higher antioxidant
concentration than leaf. Antioxidant concentration in leaf
and flower are 33 and 59mg/g respectively which are shown
in the table 5.
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [307] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Antidiabetic Activity
α- Amylase activity
Amylase activity was calculated in terms of percentage and
leaf extract showed 29.78% while flower extract showed
34.07% shown in table 6. Flower Extract has lower amylase
inhibitory activity than leaf.
α - Glucosidase activity
Glucosidase inhibitory properties are starch blockers, which
inhibit was calculated in terms of percentage and leaf extract
showed 31.92% while flower extract showed 37.76% shown
in table 7. Leaf extract has lower glucosidase inhibitory
activity than flower. Therefore, flower has higher anti
diabetic activity than flower.
Anti Inflammatory Activity
Anti-proteinase action
Anti-proteinase activity was evaluated for leaf and flower
extracts and inflammation inhibitory activity of leaf and
flower were 94.46% and 88.93% respectively shown in table
8. Further, both these extracts have higher amount of
inflammatory inhibitory activity. Leaf extract has higher
inflammatory inhibitory activity than flower extract.
Antimicrobial Activity
The zone of inhibition of bacterial organisms along with
extracts is shown in table 9. Leaf and flower extract shown
significant inhibition effect on growth of bacteria.
Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are
inhibited more effectively by the plant extract than
Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae due to bigger zone
of inhibition. Comparing the extracts, flower extract shown
more antibacterial activity than leaf extract.
The zones of inhibition of fungal organisms along with
extracts are shown in table 10. The extracts have antifungal
activity against A. flavus but extracts had no effect on A. niger.
Thus, we can say that both extracts have low inhibitory
activity against the used organisms and its range on anti-
fungal activity is limited.
Anticancer Activity
The percentages of cell death of extracts in different
concentrations are given in the table 11. Both the extracts
have significant anticancer activity. Comparing extracts, leaf
extracts have higher anticancer activity than flower extract.
DNA Nicking Assay
Sample was run on agarose gel electrophoresis and bands
were observed on UV- illuminator. The first well contains
control which contains only DNA and second well contains
DNA marker. 3rd well contains DNA with leaf extract and 4th
well DNA with flower extract. As DNA remains single band
when extracts were added, so we conclude that DNA was not
cleaved and hence extracts do not have DNA damaging
property.
Table 2: antioxidant concentration of extracts in different amount from DPPH assay
Amount
(mg)
Antioxidant conc
(mg/g of powder)
10
6
20
8
30
19
10
11
20
31
30
36
Table 3: Flavonoid concentration of extracts
Sample
Flavonoid content (mg/g)
Flower
19
Leaf
30
Table 4: total phenol content of extracts
Sample
Total phenol content (mg/g)
Flower
7
Leaf
5
Table 5: Antioxidant concentration of extracts from FRAP assay
Sample
Antioxidant concentration (mg/g)
Flower
59
Leaf
33
Table 6: Amylase inhibitory activity of extracts
Sample
α- Amylase inhibitory activity (%)
Leaf
29.87
Flower
34.07
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [308] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Table 7: glucosidase inhibitory activity of extracts
Sample
α Glucosidase inhibitory activity (%)
Leaf
31.92
Flower
37.76
Table 8: Inflammation inhibitory activity of extracts
Sample
Inflammation inhibitory activity (%)
Leaf
64.46
Flower
58.93
Figure 4: Antibacerial activity against P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, E. coli and K. pneumoniae
Figure 5: Antifungal activity against A. flavus and A. niger
Table 9: zone of inhibition of extracts against different bacteria
Microorganism used
Leaf extract (mm)
Flower extract (mm)
Gentamicin disc (mm)
Sterile distilled water
E coli
7
8
10
NIL
K pneumoniae
8
9
10
NIL
S aureus
11
13
10
NIL
P aeroginosa
12
13
10
NIL
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [309] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Table 10: zone of inhibition of extracts against different fungi
Table 11: percentage of cell death of extracts of different volumes
Sample
Volume (µl)
Percentage of cell death (%)
Leaf
10
41.55
20
45.6
30
49.47
Flower
10
34.5
20
44.89
30
57.22
Figure 6: Agarose gel visualised in UV- transilluminator after electrophoresis. 3rd and 4th well from left contains DNA
with leaf and flower extracts, respectively. Note that they form single band and was not damaged due to reaction with
extracts
DISCUSSION
In the study of Ali esmail4 on phytochemical studies in
common jasmine (Jasminum officinale), aqueous extracts of
Jasminum officinale leaves indicated presence of alkaloids,
flavonoids, tannins, terpenoids, glycosides, leuco
anthocyanins, steroids, anthocyanins, phlobatinins, essential
oil and saponins.In the study of mittalet al16on
phytochemical studies in Jasminum auriculatum, solvent
extracts of plant leaves revealed presence of alkaloids,
carbohydrates, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins,
tannins and phenolic compounds. In the study of Bhagat et
al15 on phytochemical studies in Jasminum arborescens,
solvent extracts revealed presence of terpenoids, flavonoids,
steroids, glycosides, tannins and saponins. In the present
study, leaves and flower extracts indicated presence of
alkaloids, terpenoids, sugars, saponins, flavonoids, quinines,
proteins and phenol.
Aliesmail4also investigated antioxidant activity in Jasminum
officinale, The total phenolic contents of the aqueous extract
of Jasminum officinale leaves was 104.02 mg/g gallic acid
equivalent, the total flavonoids content was 10.76 mg/g
quercetin equivalent, the total antioxidant capacity was
155.40 μg/ml and reducing power was 44.28 μg/ml, In
study of Bhagat et al16 on anti oxidant activity in Jasminum
arborescens, DPPH scavenging activity inhibition was in the
range of 40 to 80 %. FRAP assay revealed 50 to 85 %
inhibition. In the study of Jyothsana et al17 on antioxidant
activity in Jasminum auriculatum, DPPH scavenging activity
was in range of 22 to 70 %. Reducing power assay was in
range of 40 to 80 %. In this study, DPPH antioxidant
concentration was in the range of 6 to 36 mg/g. Total
flavonoid of flower and leaf was 19 mg/g equivalent
quercetine and 30 mg/g equivalent quercetine respectively.
Total phenol content of flower and leaf was 7 mg/g
equivalent gallic acid and 5 mg/g equivalent gallic acid
respectively. FRAP antioxidant concentration in flower and
leaf were 59 mg/g equivalent ascorbic acid and 33 mg/g
equivalent ascorbic acid respectively.
In the study of Shivakumarswamy et al18, using plant extract
of Jasminum grandiflorum, glucose reduction level ranges
from 0.4 to 70% which is indicator of anti diabetic activity. In
this study, using extracts of Jasminum polyanthum,
antidiabetic activity of extracts ranges from 29 to 38%.
Nurulislam et al19, investigated anti-inflammatory activity
using plant extract of Jasminum sambac and was found to be
in the range of 6 to 51%. In the study of Sangita kumara et
al20, using extract of Tabernaemontana divaricata (crepe
jasmine), anti inflammatory activity was in the range of 22 to
58%. In this study,using the plant extract of Jasminum
polyanthum, anti inflammatory activity of leaf and flower
extract was found to be 64.46% and 58.93% respectively.
Srinivas ampati et al21done antibacterial activity in Jasminum
officinale, solvent extracts showed zone of inhibition ranging
from 14 to 24 mm. In study of Aliesmail4 on antibacterial
activity of Jasminum officinale, solvent extracts revealed zone
of inhibition ranging from 10 to 20 mm. In the study of
Usman et al22 in antibacterial activity of Jasminum officinale,
aqueous extracts of flower showed zone of inhibition in the
Microorganism used
Leaf extract
Flower extract
Distilled water
A. flavus
10 mm
8 mm
NIL
A.niger
NIL
NIL
NIL
Jaya Prakkash et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2019; 9(2):303-310
ISSN: 2250-1177 [310] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
range of 9-18 mm. In our study, aqueous extracts of flowers
and leaves shows zone of inhibition ranging from 7 to 13
mm.
Research work of Manokaran et al23, using plant extracts of
Jasminum sambac, anti cancer activity on HeLa cells revealed
percentage of cell death ranges from 17 to 98%. In this study,
using plant extracts of Jasminum polyanthum, percentage of
cell death ranges from 35 to 57% for different
concentrations of leaf and flower extracts.
Report of Srinivas ampati21 on antifungal activity in
Jasminum officinale, solvent extracts showed zone of
inhibition ranging from 12 to 20 mm andAliesmail4on
antifungal activity in Jasminum officinale, solvent extracts
shown zone of inhibition from 14 to 20 mm. The present
study, antifungal activity is lower and it shows zone of
inhibition maximum of 10 mm
CONCLUSION
In the present study the Jasmine leaf and flower extracts
were used to find out the various bioactive compounds. The
qualitative screening showed the presence of various
bioactive compounds and the antioxidant properties were
also studied. The DPPH, FRAP, total phenol and Flavonoids
content were estimated. The antibacterial activities were
also studied against E.coli, K.pneumoniae, S.aureus,
P.aeruginosa bacteria and A.niger and A. flavus for fungi. The
antidiabetic activity was also studied. The anticancer activity
against HeLa cells showed 35 to 55% of cell death. The DNA
fragment study was carried out to find out DNA damaging
property and was found to have no DNA damaging property.
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... sessiliflorum contains alkaloids, glycosides, phenols, quinones (anthraquinones), saponins, steroids, terpenoids, and tannins [83,84]. Moreover, leaves as well as flowers of Jasminum arborescens contain alkaloids (quinines), flavonoids, phenols, saponins, and terpenoids [20]. ...
... Further, its stem contains sesquiterpenoids [95]. Jasminum polyanthum's leaves and flowers contain alkaloids, phenols, quinines, saponins, and terpenoids [20]. Finally, leaves of Jasminum syringifolium contain alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids, steroids, and tannins [43]. ...
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