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Abstract

The 2018 fire season in Greece started out quietly. The weather was quite favorable, with above average precipitation and lack of strong winds and/or heat waves. But on July 23rd - things changed dramatically. On that tragic day, a wildfire in Northeastern Attica set a new record for fire fatalities in Greece, and became the second deadliest fire in the world for this century. One hundred people were killed and 150 more injured. More than 1,650 homes burned along with 1,431 hectares (5.5 square miles) of agro-forestry vegetation and urbanized land. We provide a synoptic overview of what happened that day and identify the major factors contributing to the disaster in the hope of helping Greece and other countries to avoid similar tragedies in the future.
... as wind speed (40 km/h), temperature (31 • C), and relative humidity (40%) (Xanthopoulos and Athanasiou, 2019). All these environmental features, coupled with topographic profile of the terrain (i.e., down-slope characteristics of the eastern region of Attica) incorporated into the FlamMap model, made it possible to simulate the rapid fire spread as observed during the event. ...
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