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Collaborative consumption for low and high trust requiring business models: from fare sharing to supporting the elderly and people with disability

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... Cheng et al. (2020) investigated drivers' trust (prosumers as producers) through uncertainty reduction theory (URT) and found social interactions, politeness and enjoyment as key factors to build trust-in-passenger (prosumers as consumers), which consequently influences the drivers' sharing intention (Prosumption). Moreover, Previous studies examined how trust influences prosumers' intentions to interact through digital platforms within the sharing economy (Cheng, Fu, et al., 2019;Cheng, Kroenung, et al., 2019;Meng et al., 2020). Hawlitschek et al. (2016) suggested that in C-C interaction, if consumers have trust towards peers, platform, and product (3P), then the consumer will be evoked to exhibit prosumption behavior. ...
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Information technologies (ITs), including digital platforms and the Internet of things have dramatically supported prosumption behaviour in value co-creation (VCC) development under the sharing economy perspective. However, privacy-safety risk (PSR) and prosumers’ trust may have a significant impact on this transaction through digital platforms under the sharing economy. Therefore, this study examined the prosumption role as a mediator between PSR and VCC through a digital platform under the sharing economy. Moreover, the moderating role of prosumers’ trust between prosumption and VCC has been explored. This study used quantitative methodology and data were collected from Uber customers in Pakistan and and DiDi customers in China respectively. Online self-administrative questionnaire was distributed and consequently, 391 responses were collected. Structural equation modeling has been used to test the hypothesized relationships. This study found that prosumption mediates the relationship between PSR and VCC and trust moderates the relationship between prosumption and VCC. Furthermore, the conditional indirect effect (moderated mediating effect) of PSR on VCC through prosumption in the presence of prosumers’ trust was found significant under the sharing economy. This study portrays the influence of PSR and prosumers’ trust factors to understand the prosumption and VCC relationship through a digital platform which provide win-win outcome for customers and company as well under the sharing economy perspective.
... Typical users of consumer-to-consumer (C2C) platforms are non-professional individuals with neither an established brand image nor global recognition. Consumption on these platforms requires different levels of trust [15], yet many C2C transactions yield high economic, social, and physical exposure [16]. Users of BlaBlaCar (rides) and Wingly (flights), for instance, literally put their lives into the hands of their respective driver or pilot. ...
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Two-sided markets are gaining increasing importance. Examples include accommodation and car sharing, resale, shared mobility, crowd work, and many more. As these businesses rely on transactions among users, central aspects to virtually all platforms are the creation and maintenance of trust. While research has considered effects of trust-building on diverse platforms in isolation, the overall platform landscape has received much less attention. However, cross-platform comparison is important since platforms vary in their degree of social interaction, which, as we demonstrate in this paper, determines the adequacy and use of different trust mechanisms. Based on actual market data, we examine the mechanisms platforms employ and how frequent users rely on them. We contrast this view against survey data on users' perceptions of the context-specific importance of these trust-building tools. Our findings provide robust evidence for our reasoning on the relation between platforms' degree of social interaction and the associated expressive trust cues.
... El acceso a la Internet y la relativa facilidad existente para adquirir herramientas de comunicación como Tablets, celulares o computadores, ha permitido la apertura de espacios de interacción entre individuos que se pueden realizar gracias a la confianza (Zarifis, Cheng, & Kroenung, 2019). ...
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El objetivo de este trabajo es hacer una revisión de literatura junto a una reflexión que permita analizar el consumo colaborativo desde la perspectiva institucional y la neoinstitucional. Identificando las categorías teóricas que permitieron a las tecnologías de la información y comunicación imponer una nueva institución, dándole una seria relevancia a los elementos propuestos por Tholstein Veblen y Schumpeter. Posteriormente, entendiendo esta institución como una que permite armonizar los deseos individuales con los de la comunidad, observar que elementos comparte con la Responsabilidad Social Organizacional.
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En este documento se presentan las bases conceptuales para el estudio de la Economía Colaborativa. Se plantean las diferencias entre las modalidades de intercambio económico emergentes a partir de la mediación tecnológica, tales como la economía de conciertos y la economía digital. Para esto, se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica a partir de la metodología de revisión sistemática de literatura para ciencias sociales y económicas en Scopus, WoS y Redalyc en el periodo 2008-2019. Este ejercicio permitió ubicar a la economía colaborativa como una nueva institución económica que posee cuatro subsectores: consumo, producción, educación y finanzas. La economía colaborativa se distingue por las soluciones particulares, la forma de solucionar las necesidades de las personas y en la creación de comunidad. El documento concluye que a) es importante que la academia y los estados miren con detenimiento las diferencias entre las modalidades estudiadas y b) la economía colaborativa es un mecanismo para el cambio social.
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The article reports the findings of a study conducted among 387 consumers regarding their perceptions of the unethicality of business practices of firms and how these affect their response behavior, in terms of trust, satisfaction, and loyalty. The study confirmed that high levels of perceived corporate unethicality decrease consumer trust. This in turn reduces consumer satisfaction, which ultimately has negative effects on customer loyalty. It was also revealed that, although both consumer gender and urbanity have a moderating effect on the link between perceived unethicality and trust, the age group and level of education of the consumer did not exhibit such an effect. With regard to consumer cultural characteristics, both high uncertainty avoidance and low individualism were found to increase the negative impact of business unethicality on trust, as opposed to power distance and masculinity that did not have any moderating effect on this relationship. Implications for managers are extracted from the study findings, as well as directions for future research.
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This paper aims to predict consumer acceptance of e-commerce by proposing a set of key drivers for engaging consumers in on-line transactions. The primary constructs for capturing consumer acceptance of e-commerce are intention to transact and on-line transaction behavior. Following the theory of reasoned action (TRA) as applied to a technology-driven environment, technology acceptance model (TAM) variables (perceived usefulness and ease of use) are posited as key drivers of e-commerce acceptance. The practical utility of TAM stems from the fact that e-commerce is technology-driven. The proposed model integrates trust and perceived risk, which are incorporated given the implicit uncertainty of the e-commerce environment. The proposed integration of the hypothesized independent variables is justified by placing all the variables under the nomological TRA structure and proposing their interrelationships. The resulting research model is tested using data from two empirical studies. The first, exploratory study comprises three experiential scenarios with 103 students. The second, confirmatory study uses a sample of 155 on-line consumers. Both studies strongly support the e-commerce acceptance model by validating the proposed hypotheses. The paper discusses the implications for e-commerce theory, research, and practice, and makes several suggestions for future research.
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The paper provides a broad and multifaceted review of the received literature on business models in which we examine the business model concept through multiple subject-matter lenses. The review reveals that scholars do not agree on what a business model is, and that the literature is developing largely in silos, according to the phenomena of interest to the respective researchers. However, we also found emerging common themes among scholars of business models. Specifically, 1) the business model is emerging as a new unit of analysis; 2) business models emphasize a system-level, holistic approach towards explaining how firms “do business”; 3) firm activities play an important role in the various conceptualizations of business models that have been proposed; and 4) business models seek to explain how value is created, not just how it is captured. These emerging themes could serve as catalysts towards a more unified study of business models.
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While the literature on anti-consumption is rich and growing, there is still a lack of understanding among consumer researchers regarding why consumers choose to avoid consumption. This study seeks to extend the literature by exploring whether a group of consumers who reduce consumption through choosing to share rather than own are motivated by anti-consumption reasons. The authors use quantitative data from 397 toy library members to explore why members choose to participate in this form of sharing. The study reveals four groups – Socialites, Market Avoiders, Quiet Anti-Consumers and Passive Members. The Socialites enjoy the social benefits of active participation in their library. The Market Avoiders also perceived social and community benefits, are interested in sharing and are the least materialistic of the groups. The Quiet Anti-Consumers feel a sense of belonging to their toy library and hold strong anti-consumption, frugality and sharing values. The Passive Members are not socially involved, nor did they hold strong anti-consumption values. Thus, the authors find evidence that sharing may be one possible alternative market structure that may be adopted by anti-consumption consumers. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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An integrative framework from information privacy and relationship marketing arenas was employed to investigate whether a traditional business-to-business relationship marketing framework could be applied to the information-intensive online business-to-consumer channel. Roles of consumers' privacy concerns and perceived e-tailer's reputation on their trust in, commitment toward, and purchase intent toward a services e-tailer were examined. Effects of opt-in versus opt-out choice strategies on consumers' privacy concerns and trust were also studied. Results showed that the strongest relationships leading to online purchase intent were those between trust in and commitment toward an e-tailer and between firm reputation and trust. Privacy concerns influenced purchase intent with strong negative effects, both directly and indirectly through trust. No difference was observed in respective direct effects of choice strategy on privacy concerns, nor were strategies found to moderate reputation on privacy concerns or trust. Managerial implications are discussed.
Technology strategy and management the sharing economy meets reality
  • M A Cusumano
Cusumano, M.A. (2018) 'Technology strategy and management the sharing economy meets reality', Communications of the ACM, No. 1, pp.26-29.
Introduction to the special issue social commerce: a research framework for social commerce
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From Zipcar to the sharing economy
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Sundararajan, A. (2013) 'From Zipcar to the sharing economy', Harvard Business Review, pp.4-7 [online] http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/01/from_zipcar_to_the_sharing_eco.html.
Consumer trust in digital currency enabled transactions
  • A Zarifis
Zarifis, A. et al. (2014) 'Consumer trust in digital currency enabled transactions', Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, Vol. 183, pp.241-254.