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The authors of this chapter advocate for the integration of environmental justice thinking in telecoupling research. The chapter provides a succinct review of the history and conceptual foundations of environmental justice, which encompass distribution, recognition and participation issues, and it reviews the most recent empirical case studies in the telecoupling literature. The findings show that few empirical analyses of telecoupled systems have directly incorporated environmental justice in their analytical approach and those which address justice issues do so indirectly, with more focus on distribution than on participation and recognition. The chapter argues that addressing questions of recognition and participation more centrally in telecoupling research and combining both quantitative and qualitative methods can contribute to more systematic attention towards environmental justice in telecoupled systems.

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... Such a distribution would necessarily involve measures targeted to the multiple land user groups influencing land management, and acknowledge the broader political economy and distant connections (e.g. remote consumer preferences) contributing to landscape flammability (Barlow et al., 2018;Corbera, Busck-Lumholt, Mempel, & Rodríguez-Labajos, 2019;Sorrensen, 2003). ...
... We highlight an ethical issue in which mitigating risks created partly by external factors has fallen to local land managers. Such problems are manifest in other environmental justice spaces, including within the climate justice movement where questions of responsibility, blame and the disproportionate impacts on particular groups of people creates ethical and governance dilemmas (Boillat et al., 2018;Corbera et al., 2019;Fischer et al., 2012). Further, these interactions across scales combined with the attributes of fire (e.g. to move after being set giving anonymity to fire-users) make it difficult to define attribution and apportion culpability (Gaveau et al., 2017;Kull, 2004). ...
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The author wishes to thank Jean-Philippe Leblond, Bruno Thibert and Pham Thanh Hai, as well as the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, for its support to the project entitled “The Challenges of the Agrarian Transition in Southeast Asia”. “The state is panoptic. It likes to see those that it likes and even more those who do not like him. The state likes to mark out the land and regroup people.”(Translated from Brunet 1990: 63.) A Question of Territory Geopolitics Although...
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In this essay, Professor Lazarus discusses former NAACP director the Rev. Dr. Benjamin Chavis's characterization of U.S. environmental policy as "environmental racism." He first justifies this provocative topic choice and then suggests that Chavis's allegation has transformed environmental law. Professor Lazarus next discusses the details of this transformation, arguing that Rev. Chavis has essentially reshaped the way environmental law and justice are conceived. He offers examples of various environmental programs and social and political effects traceable to Chavis's environmental racism comment. Finally, the conclusion provides some of the author's ruminations about the future of environmental law and policy.
Tensions Flare over Government 'Land Grabs' in China. The Guardian (China Blog)
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Grammaticas, Damian. 2013. Tensions Flare over Government 'Land Grabs' in China. The Guardian (China Blog), November 9. https://www.bbc.com/ news/blogs-china-blog-24865658.
Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World
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Agyeman, Julian, Robert D. Bullard, and Bob Evans. 2003. Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
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  • Patrick Kuemmerle
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Gasparri, Nestor Ignacio, Tobias Kuemmerle, Patrick Meyfroidt, Yann le Polain de Waroux, and Holger Kreft. 2016. The Emerging Soybean Production Frontier in Southern Africa: Conservation Challenges and the Role of South-South Telecouplings. Conservation Letters 9 (1): 21-31. https://doi.org/ 10.1111/conl.12173.
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Schröter, M., T. Koellner, R. Alkemade, S. Arnhold, K.J. Bagstad, K.H. Erb, K. Frank, T. Kastner, M. Kissinger, J. Liu, L. López-Hoffman, J. Maes, A. Marques, B. Martín-López, C. Meyer, C.J.E. Schulp, J. Thober, S. Wolff, and A. Bonn. 2018. Interregional Flows of Ecosystem Services: Concepts, Typology and Four Cases. Ecosystem Services 31: 231-241.
Justice Interrupts: Critical Reflections on the
  • Nancy Fraser
Fraser, Nancy. 1997. Justice Interrupts: Critical Reflections on the "Postsocialist" Condition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.