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Abstract

Introduction: Adults working in full time sedentary jobs spend 75% of their job time sitting, in terms of total time of sedentary behaviour of individuals. This population is at a greater risk of sedentary behaviour, due to elevation in the prevalence of sedentary office work and leisure time habits, resulting in 9-11 hours of total sitting time per day. Some of the occupations have adapted a sedentary behaviour, they demand long hours of being in one position. Adults adapt to faulty postures due to prolonged hours of work leading to muscular imbalances which highly contribute to the increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders. These disorders mainly occur due to weakening of the “core” musculature i.e. the central musculature of the body. This in turn may lead to excessive load on the lumbar spine, back, poor endurance of muscles, muscle imbalance and lower extremity disorders. Aim: To find out the prevalence of core weakness in bank employees with respect to their gender, age and Body Mass Index (BMI). Materials and Methods: A total of 99 healthy bank employees (67 males and 32 females), who were physically inactive for 6-8 hours daily and exercising for less than 2 hours per week, with their age between 20-50 years, were selected for the assessment of their core for finding its weakness. To find whether the bank employees had core weakness, outcome assessment was done by using a Chattanooga Pressure Stabilizer™. Results: In this study, statistically significant difference was noted within individuals with normal BMI (18.5-24.99 Kg/m2), whereas with respect to the age and gender, no statistically significant difference was noted. Conclusion: The prevalence of core weakness in bank employees was found to be 72.73%; majority of core weakness was found within the age group of 45-50 years (23.6%) which was relatively higher than other age groups. Prevalence of core weakness was found to be more in male population (65.3%) and in individuals with normal BMI (52.8%)
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2019 Mar, Vol-13(3): YC17-YC20 1717
DOI: 10.7860/JCDR/2019/40155.12697 Original Article
Miscellaneous
Postgraduate Education
Letter to Editor
Short Communication
Images in Medicine
Experimental Research
Clinician’s corner
Review Article
Case Report
Case Series
Physiotherapy Section
Prevalence of Core Weakness
in Bank Employees
INTRODUCTION
Sedentary lifestyle has been increasing, as physical activity has been
decreasing due to the rapid growth in technology in the last couple
of decades. Minimising human movements and muscular activity
have had a dual effect on human behaviour causing the people to
move less and sit more [1,2].
Over the past decade, a number of developed nations showed high
prevalence of physical inactivity among individuals having diabetes,
obesity and practicing sedentary lifestyle, etc., [3-6]. Prevalence
of physical inactivity in various parts of India was found to be
Chandigarh (66.8%), Jharkhand (34.9%), Maharashtra (55.2%) and
Tamil Nadu (60%) and the estimated number of inactive individuals in
India would be 392 million [3]. In another study that was conducted
in Puducherry, prevalence of physical inactivity was found to be
49.7% (n=283) and in adults with adequate physical activity level, it
was 50.3% (n=286) [4].
Adults working in full time sedentary jobs spend 75% of their job time
sitting, in terms of total time of sedentary behaviour of individuals;
Work and non-work time contributed 36.5 hours & 38.7 hours per
week respectively [5,7] resulting in 9-11 hours of total sitting time
per day [6].
Some of the occupations demands long hours of being in one
position. Core weakness can be defined as the weakness of the
central musculature of the body which includes the abdominal and
back muscles, due to lack of physical inactivity and adaptation
of faulty postures during prolonged hours of work. There are
muscular imbalances that highly contribute to the increased risk
of musculoskeletal disorders associated with low back pain [8-12].
This in turn may lead to excessive loading on the lumbar spine,
back, poor endurance of muscles, muscle imbalance and lower
extremity disorders [13]. Traditionally core stability can be referred to
the active component including the local/deep muscles that provide
segmental stability (e.g., transversus abdominis, lumbar multifidus)
and/or the global/superficial muscles (e.g., retus abdominis, erector
spinae) that enable torque/trunk movement and also assist in
stability in more physically demanding activities.
For assessing the core strength certain tools and methods are
available which include Plank test, Metabolic Equivalents (MET),
Electromyography (EMG), Modified Sphygmomanometer Test
(MST), Pressure Biofeedback Unit (PBU) etc., [3,14-17].
Moreover, till date no study has been conducted to assess the core
strength among bank employees lacking maximal physical activity.
As it is said precaution is better than cure, it is important to find out
the prevalence of core weakness in bank employees, so as to help
the bank employees from losing the working hours, taking leaves
and avoiding other musculoskeletal disorders caused due to core
weakness.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Physiotherapy
department of Krishna Hospital and Research Centre in Karad city.
The data was collected from 10th April to 30th April 2018. The study
population of 99 individuals was the banking employees of various
banks who were selected by purposive sampling method.
Sample size and sampling: A sample size of 99 was calculated by
the statistician assuming the 55.2% prevalence of physical inactivity
with 15% relative precision, 95 confidence and 20% attrition rate
based on ICMR-INDIAB study, Maharashtra status [3]. Data was
PRACHITI RAJAN BHORE1, KHUSHBOO BATHIA2, SMITA KANASE3, AMRUTKUVAR JADHAV4
Keywords: Core muscles, Core stability, Low back pain, Physical activity, Pressure biofeedback, Sedentary work
ABSTRACT
Introduction: Adults working in full time sedentary jobs spend
75% of their job time sitting, in terms of total time of sedentary
behaviour of individuals. This population is at a greater risk
of sedentary behaviour, due to elevation in the prevalence
of sedentary office work and leisure time habits, resulting in
9-11 hours of total sitting time per day. Some of the occupations
have adapted a sedentary behaviour, they demand long hours
of being in one position. Adults adapt to faulty postures due
to prolonged hours of work leading to muscular imbalances
which highly contribute to the increased risk of musculoskeletal
disorders. These disorders mainly occur due to weakening of
the “core” musculature i.e. the central musculature of the body.
This in turn may lead to excessive load on the lumbar spine,
back, poor endurance of muscles, muscle imbalance and lower
extremity disorders.
Aim: To find out the prevalence of core weakness in bank
employees with respect to their gender, age and Body Mass
Index (BMI).
Materials and Methods: A total of 99 healthy bank employees
(67 males and 32 females), who were physically inactive for 6-8
hours daily and exercising for less than 2 hours per week, with
their age between 20-50 years, were selected for the assessment
of their core for finding its weakness. To find whether the bank
employees had core weakness, outcome assessment was done
by using a Chattanooga Pressure Stabilizer™.
Results: In this study, statistically significant difference was
noted within individuals with normal BMI (18.5-24.99 Kg/m2),
whereas with respect to the age and gender, no statistically
significant difference was noted.
Conclusion: The prevalence of core weakness in bank
employees was found to be 72.73%; majority of core weakness
was found within the age group of 45-50 years (23.6%) which
was relatively higher than other age groups. Prevalence of core
weakness was found to be more in male population (65.3%)
and in individuals with normal BMI (52.8%).
Prachiti Rajan Bhore et al., Prevalence of Core Muscle Weakness in Bank Employees www.jcdr.net
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2019 Mar, Vol-13(3): YC17-YC20
1818
DISCUSSION
In this study, among the 99 selected bank employees, prevalence of
core weakness was present in 72 bank employees which was found
to be 72.73% [Table/Fig-3]. Another cross-sectional study was done
to find the prevalence of high Sedentary Behaviour (SB) among
42,469 individuals of six countries, aged >18 years. The prevalence
of high SB was found to be China (9%), Ghana (6.4%), India (5.2%),
Mexico (3.9%), Russia (17.7%), South Africa (4.6%). This data from
the World Health Organization’s Study on Global Ageing and Adult
Health was analysed to find an overall prevalence of high sedentary
behaviour to be 8.3% [20]. Core weakness was found to be more
prevalent in males rather than females [Table/Fig-4]. A reason for this
may be that females are involved in all the household activities which
make them more physically active than the males during their non-
working hours [3]. A study reviewed prevalence of physical inactivity
among adults was estimated to be 31.1%. Physical inactivity was
more prevalent among males (22.4%) than females (14.4%), although
this difference was not statistically significant. These individuals were
found to carry out activities such as gardening and farming [21].
collected and the overall procedure was supervised by the faculty
incharge. The proforma was checked by faculty incharge for quality
assurance.
Inclusion Criteria
1) Age group between 20-50 years; 2) Healthy individuals but
physically inactive for 6-8 hours daily, exercising for less than
2 hours per week; 3) Both genders; 4) Subjects willing to participate
in the study.
Exclusion Criteria
1) Individuals with any history of spine pathology or fracture;
2) abdominal or spine surgery; 3) LBP for more than 3 months or
present LBP; 4) individuals involved in gym or exercising regularly
for 2-4 hours per day.
Outcome Measure
Outcome assessment was done by using Chattanooga Pressure
Stabilizer™ with subjects positioned on the plinth in crook lying
position with the placement of Pressure Biofeedback Unit (PBU)
under the lumbar spine at L3 level, right below the umbilicus and
it was inflated to 40 mmHg. The intra-rater and inter-rater reliability
of PBU for measurement of Transverse abdominis were (ICC>0.98)
and (ICC>0.99) with 95% confidence interval which was found to be
excellent. The inflated pressure for beginners is 40 mmHg whereas
for athletes its 70 mmHg [16,17]. It has been documented that core
stability assessment with hip flexion or knee extension/flexion, the
90° position has the best reliability (ICC, 0.94) or (ICC, 0.77) of the
assessor as compared to the other joint positions [18,19]. Individuals
were instructed to “Take a breath in and as you exhale, gently draw
your navel in towards your spine”. Individuals were asked to maintain
abdominal contraction for as long as they could but weren’t made
aware that they had to contract it for at least 10 seconds of duration
while maintaining a pressure of 40 mmHg on the Pressure gauge.
Five practice repetitions with verbal and tactile feedback made
prior to recording the data to correct errors. All the samples weren’t
allowed to look at the PBU gauge at any time [16].
Core Weakness will be considered more in bank employees who
were not be able to maintain the pressure at or above 40 mmHg.
According to duration it will be considered more in bank employees
who were not be able to maintain the contraction for 10 more
seconds.
Ethical clearance was obtained from the Institutional Ethical
Committee of KIMSDU. Individuals were approached and those
fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected. The procedure was
explained and written informed consent was taken from those willing
to participate. Demographic information of the subjects was taken.
The individuals were explained about the purpose of the study. Also,
they were informed about the procedure. Each of them was assessed
for the Core weakness using a PBU. Data was recorded. Statistical
analysis was done in relation to distribution of the age, gender, BMI
as well as holding of pressure and duration of the PBU.
RESULTS
Association between gender and core weakness by Pearson Chi-
Square test, was found to be (0.695) and p-value (0.405) which
was not significant [Table/Fig-1]. The p-value found with Fisher’s-
exact test was (0.475) as this p-value was >0.05 it was found to be
not significant [Table/Fig-1]. Association between gender and core
weakness by Pearson Chi-Square test, it was found to be (4.258)
with 5 degree of freedom and p-value of (0.513) which was not
significant [Table/Fig-1]. The p-value found with Linear by Linear
Association was (0.482) as this p-value was >0.05 it was found to be
not significant [Table/Fig-1] and association between BMI and core
weakness by Pearson Chi-Square test, it was found to be 58.247
and p-value of (0.679) which was not significant [Table/Fig-1]. The
Pearson chi-square Fisher’s-exact test Linear by linear
association
Category Value df p-value Value df p-value Value df p-value
Gender 0.695 1 0.405 (NS) - - 0.475
(NS)
- - -
Age 4.258 5 0.513 (NS) - - - 4.487 5 0.482
(NS)
BMI 58.247 64 0.679 (NS) - - - 4.535 1 0.033 (S)
[Table/Fig-1]: Association of core weakness with gender, age and BMI.
Duration
Pressure <10 Percentage 10 Percentage Chi-Square p-value
<40 13 27.1% 24 100% >0.05(NS)
40 35 72.9% 0 0
Total 48 100% 24 100%
[Table/Fig-2]: Cross tabulation of pressure against duration.
NS*-Not Significant
Core Weakness Percentage
Present 72 72.73 %
Absent 27 27.27%
Total 99 100%
[Table/Fig-3]: Prevalence of core weakness.
Gender Presence of Core Weakness Percentage
Male 47 65.3%
Female 25 34.7%
Total 72 100%
[Table/Fig-4]: Prevalence of core weakness according to gender.
It was clear that out of these 72 bank employees, core weakness
was found to be more prevalent in the age group of 45-50 years and
the least was seen in the age group of 20-25 years [Table/Fig-5]. The
cause due to which core weakness was found in Bank employees in
the age group of 45-50 years might be that, as these individuals are
ageing their muscles fibers and muscle mass reduces, so they tend
to get easily fatigued on carrying out any activity; hence they are less
physically active. On the other hand the bank employees within the
age group of 20-25 years are still young, energetic and are more active
than the individuals above the age of 40 years. The other reason for
core weakness might be aging process leading to muscle strength
p-value found with Linear by linear association was (0.033) as this
p-value was <0.05 it was found to be significant [Table/Fig-1]. The
p-value for cross tabulation of pressure against duration was >0.05
hence it was found to be not significant [Table/Fig-2].
www.jcdr.net Prachiti Rajan Bhore et al., Prevalence of Core Muscle Weakness in Bank Employees
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2019 Mar, Vol-13(3): YC17-YC20 1919
loss in individuals above of age of 40 years (40.9%) [22]. Global
recommendations given on physical activity suggests that moderate to
vigorous physical activity is necessary for each age group, re-evaluation
of exercise habits and its intensity are required [23].
RECOMMENDATIONS
Similar study can be done in different sedentary occupations.
Comparative study can be done between the sedentary workers
belonging to different professions. Studies with inclusion of
individuals with musculoskeletal disorders or complaints. Future
researches must include details of leisure time of the individual. The
overall physical activities during the day should also be considered
in the upcoming research studies. Comparative studies can be
done with different postures suitable for core muscle assessment
with the Pressure biofeedback unit.
CONCLUSION
On the basis of the results of the study, it was concluded that core
weakness in bank employees which was found to be 72.73%; Co-
relation of core weakness with age was found within the age group
of 45-50 years (23.6%) which was relatively higher than other age
groups. Co-relation of core weakness with gender was found to be
higher in male population (65.3%) and in individuals with normal BMI
(52.8%). Statistically significant difference was noted in individuals
with normal BMI, whereas no statistically significant difference was
noted with respect to the age and gender.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Authors acknowledge the guidance and support from faculty of
physiotherapy and also express their most humble and profound
gratitude to their respected Dean Dr. G. Varadharajulu, Dean, Faculty
of Physiotherapy, KIMSDU for his inspiration, motivation, valuable
guidance and suggestions throughout this project. Authors wish
to express their sincere thanks to Mr. Shankar Javali of Al-Ameen
University, Vijayapur for helping in statistical analysis.
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Age Group Presence of Core Weakness Percentage Mean±SD
20-25 05 6.9% 24.2±0.83
25-30 15 20.8% 27.86±1.12
30-35 11 15.3% 33.27±1.48
35-40 12 16.7% 37.83±1.33
40-45 12 16.7% 49.92±1.16
45-50 17 23.6% 48±1.65
Total 72 100% 37.17±8.30
[Table/Fig-5]: Prevalence of core weakness according to age.
Majority of core weakness was also noted in bank employees with a
normal BMI and minimum was seen in those who were underweight
[Table/Fig-6]. In accordance with the BMI a higher level of total
physical activity is required to lower its values [13].
BMI Presence of Core Weakness Percentage Mean±SD
Under Weight 01 1.3% 16.65±0.91
Normal Weight 38 52.8% 22.14±1.74
Over Weight 31 43.1% 26.75±1.18
Class I Obese 02 2.8% 30.85±1.06
Total 72 100% 23.88±3.03
[Table/Fig-6]: Prevalence of core weakness according to BMI.
People mostly focus on staying active by walking, jogging or
running, nobody really focuses on the core muscle strength which
is necessary for the stability required to maintain the posture while
carrying out the activities [8]. The knowledge of physical activity and
exercise is already known among many people, but the population
of people exercising regularly is small and the amount of physical
activity practiced during leisure time decreases day by day. It’s difficult
for the people to continuously uphold the habit of performing high
amounts of physical activity for greater extends of time [23]. The rate
of exercise is low due to employment and natural environment. It was
reported that approximately half of the people discontinue exercising
and performing physical activity regularly within 3-6 months of starting
[24]. Physical activity above moderate intensity is beneficial for the
health. Walking and running are basic kinds of aerobic exercises,
can be performed anytime and anyplace, at one’s own pace with no
special skills required. But, low intensity regular walking isn’t enough
for weight loss though they reduce risk factors such as metabolic
syndrome and cardiovascular diseases [25,26]. Running is useful but
is considered difficult so people don’t even attempt it [27].
This study shows that core weakness was noted in Bank employees
but the results were not statistically significant due to the limitations
such as the small sample size but the power of the study was 80%
with 95% of confidence interval. The sample size was calculated and
found to be sufficient by the statistician, as per the present geographical
area. But it was found to be more prevalent on assessing the core
muscles; which makes it completely necessary to focus on the core
muscle strengthening programs for these individuals, associated with
suggestions for postural correction in order to maintain the stability of
core of the body and a normal spinal alignment.
LIMITATION
The study group size was small; hence study results cannot be
generalised for the entire population. The accessibility to the
banks and the transport system wasn’t proper as this area is still
developing to be a proper urban city, hence yes the geographical
location was found to be a limitation. Short duration of study was
another limitation.
Prachiti Rajan Bhore et al., Prevalence of Core Muscle Weakness in Bank Employees www.jcdr.net
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2019 Mar, Vol-13(3): YC17-YC20
2020
PARTICULARS OF CONTRIBUTORS:
1. Final Year Student, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed to be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India.
2. Assistant Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed to be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India.
3. Assistant Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed to be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India.
4. Associate Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed to be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India.
NAME, ADDRESS, E-MAIL ID OF THE CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Dr. Prachiti Rajan Bhore,
Final Year Student, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed to be University,
Karad, Maharashtra, India.
E-mail: prachitibhore777@gmail.com
FINANCIAL OR OTHER COMPETING INTERESTS: None.
Date of Submission: Nov 22, 2018
Date of Peer Review: Dec 22, 2018
Date of Acceptance: Jan 18, 2019
Date of Publishing: Mar 01, 2019
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... Adults working in full-time sedentary jobs spend 75 % of their time sitting. Their sedentary behavior increases the prevalence of sedentary time habits, resulting in 9-11 hours of total daily sitting time (Bhore et al., 2019). Some occupations adapted a sedentary behavior, and employees use it in working and leisure. ...
... They stay long hours in one position, which leads to excessive load on the lumbar spine, and back, poor endurance of muscles, muscle imbalance, and lower extremity disorders. Bhore et al. (2019) argue that it includes weakening the body's central musculature, i.e., weakening the body's central musculature and increasing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. However, sedentary behaviors are causes of other severe adverse impacts on the human body. ...
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Introduction: From youth to the eldest, smartphones have become an essential gadget of life. Neutral head posture plays an important role in our day-to-day activities as it is responsible for stability. Although smartphones have made our lives easier, they tend to increase the number of complaints related to the cervical spine, hand complex, wrist, and elbow pain as a result of their excessive use. This might result in various faulty postural adaptations, which can greatly contribute to the increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders. Also, its prolonged use can lead to forwarding head posture (FHP), which can be accompanied by Guyon Canal Syndrome (GCS). This study aimed to find and determine the correlation between Guyon canal syndrome and forward head posture in prolonged smartphone users. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that consisted of 80 college subjects who were selected based on the criterion for selection. The data that was collected included, demographic details, smartphone usage characteristics, the severity of pain, presence of FHP, and mechanosensitivity of the ulnar nerve. Statistical analysis was done using a non-parametric test. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used. Results: The results of this study among the 80 prolonged smartphone users showed that 42 users (52.5%) were in the age group of 18–21, and 38 users (47.5%) were found to be in the age group of 22–25. Most of them were right-handed i.e., 61 (76%), while 19 (24%) were left-handed. In BMI, normal-weighing subjects (18.5-24.9) were 48 (60%) and overweight subjects were 32 (40%). Mean + SD of Smartphone Addiction Scale, Visual Analogue Scale, Upper Limb Tension Test and Occiput to Wall Distance was 29.99 + 6.50, 1.48 + 0.86, 0.73 + 0.45, and 2.78 + 0.96, respectively. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was shown to have a moderately positive correlation between both SAS and VAS (r = 0.36, p = 0.0010), SAS and ULTT (r = 0.14, p = 0.022), and SAS and OWD (r = 0.17, p = 0.013). Linear regression was used to check the correlation and significance between FHP and GCS, where the r value was (0.27) and the p-value was 0.0177, which was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, we found that there was a positive correlation between forwarding head posture and Guyon canal syndrome in prolonged smartphone users. FHP can give rise to moderate pressure on the ulnar nerve, which mainly supplies the fifth finger of the hand, causing Guyon Canal Syndrome. Hence, we can conclude that in subjects with prolonged usage of smartphones, FHP can further progress and these subjects may have the tendency to develop GCS.
... Core muscle weakness is affected in sedentary workers which can be a predisposing factor for mechanical low back pain. 12 Individual factors: Individual factors associated with MLBP in IT professionals include gender, age, obesity, or habits. ...
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Introduction: Prolonged sitting with awkward posture and long working hours are the predisposing factors for developing Mechanical Low Back Pain (LBP) in IT professionals. Poor dynamic trunk extension performance is associated with back-related permanent work disability and recurrence of LBP. The purpose of this study was to find and analyze the effect of spinal Extension exercises on Mechanical Low Back Pain in work from home IT professionals. Methods: In this comparative study, 50 work from home IT professionals from various companies were approached through emails. Subjects were randomized into two groups: Group A (n=25) was study group, and Group B (n=25) was control group. Subjects from both groups exercised three times per week for 4 months and followed the ergonomics. Pain intensity, functional disability, and strength of back extensor muscle were assessed at baseline and at the end of week 4. Results: Group A had lower pain intensity (3.24 ± 1.45 vs 4.76 ± 1.53) and functional disability (4.24 ± 2.14 vs 11.44 ± 1.75) and significantly higher back extensor strength (25.44 ± 4.3 vs 22.24 ± 4.58; P<0.05) than Group B at the end of week 4. Conclusion: Spinal Extension Exercises should be incorporated in work from home IT professionals with mechanical low back pain to stabilize back muscles and improve physical functioning with minimal discomfort. In line with this, IT professionals should also be made aware of the risk factors associated with mechanical low back pain and should be encouraged for the maintenance of physical health and fitness. Key words: Mechanical low back pain, Work from Home, IT professionals, Extension exercises, McKenzie regime of exercises, Spinal Extensor Strength.
... Core muscle weakness is affected in sedentary workers which can be a predisposing factor for mechanical low back pain. 12 Individual factors: Individual factors associated with MLBP in IT professionals include gender, age, obesity, or habits. ...
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Introduction: Prolonged sitting with awkward posture and long working hours are the predisposing factors for developing Mechanical Low Back Pain (LBP) in IT professionals. Poor dynamic trunk extension performance is associated with back-related permanent work disability and recurrence of LBP. The purpose of this study was to find and analyze the effect of spinal Extension exercises on Mechanical Low Back Pain in work from home IT professionals. Methods: In this comparative study, 50 work from home IT professionals from various companies were approached through emails. Subjects were randomized into two groups: Group A (n=25) was study group, and Group B (n=25) was control group. Subjects from both groups exercised three times per week for 4 months and followed the ergonomics. Pain intensity, functional disability, and strength of back extensor muscle were assessed at baseline and at the end of week 4. Results: Group A had lower pain intensity (3.24 ± 1.45 vs 4.76 ± 1.53) and functional disability (4.24 ± 2.14 vs 11.44 ± 1.75) and significantly higher back extensor strength (25.44 ± 4.3 vs 22.24 ± 4.58; P<0.05) than Group B at the end of week 4. Conclusion: Spinal Extension Exercises should be incorporated in work from home IT professionals with mechanical low back pain to stabilize back muscles and improve physical functioning with minimal discomfort. In line with this, IT professionals should also be made aware of the risk factors associated with mechanical low back pain and should be encouraged for the maintenance of physical health and fitness. Key words: Mechanical low back pain, Work from Home, IT professionals, Extension exercises, McKenzie regime of exercises, Spinal Extensor Strength.
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