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Finding and Using Ambiguity to Search for Innovation Opportunities

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... Potensi efek negatif dari ambiguitas pada kewirausahaan dan penciptaan usaha juga memiliki potensi efek negatif pada pertumbuhan jangka panjang dan perkembangan (Bonilla & Cubillos, 2021). Seorang individu dengan toleransi terhadap ambiguitas rendah lebih suka bekerja dalam situasi hitam-putih dibandingkan dengan individu dengan toleransi untuk ambiguitas yang lebih tinggi (Tan & Kvan, 2019). Tolerance for ambiguity dalam kewirausahaan yang tinggi membuat pelaku UKM dapat mengambil keputusan yang tepat di tengah ambiguitas yang dihadapinya. ...
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Berisi karakteristik kewirausahaan yang perlu dimiliki oleh pelaku ukm
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