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In Search of Democracy 4.0: Is Democracy as We Know It Destined to Die?

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Abstract

There are plenty of indicators of doom: Donald Trump riding roughshod over U.S. constitutional norms; the rise of high-handed strongmen across Europe supported by ethno-centric crowds; free press and free voting under attack by cyber manipulation. Add mass migration threatening borders and national identities; rising wealth inequality; politics gridlocked by strife about rights, benefits, and duties, amidst growing resentment of "global elites" and new would-be citizens; and evolving confusion about the nature of the "common good" [1]?[5].

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... For this reason, it is not only the focus of computer or engineering science but also social science such as business administration, sociology, psychology, public administration, communication and education that should be a research focus in order to gain from the possible benefits. Some of the benefits on a societal level can be foreseen, such as using new technologies, even a promising increase in voting participation or citizen engagement, meaning more direct decision making (Manville and Ober, 2019). On the other hand, the challenges of big data on manageability concern still is a debate (Stevens and Wernimont, 2018) Integration of Health 4.0 ...
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In Turkey, a novel concept like Health 4.0 is a potential candidate seeking a solution. This paper aims to identify the scope of Health 4.0 via the perceptions gathered from appropriate vignettes with the focus of IoT stand and with the help of a qualitative approach in the first phase of the hybrid methodology. In the first phase of the study, the authors revealed the drivers and challenges of Health 4.0 by asking for the scope and awareness of Health 4.0. In the second phase of the study, the given replies to the vignettes (possible real-life scenarios) were classified into four main criteria that serve several challenges towards the adoption of Health 4.0, which were evaluated by the MACBETH (Measuring Attractiveness by a Category-Based Evaluation Technique) approach to identify main and sub-challenges towards the concept. In doing so, by analyzing in a multicriteria method, results would help to recheck and undermine the current debates around the Health 4.0 concept, helping to form many applicability levels in the future. The results revealed that security was the most important criteria followed by education, confidentiality, and the politics/manageability criteria as being the least important challenge.
... For this reason, it is not only the focus of computer or engineering science but also social science such as business administration, sociology, psychology, public administration, communication and education that should be a research focus in order to gain from the possible benefits. Some of the benefits on a societal level can be foreseen, such as using new technologies, even a promising increase in voting participation or citizen engagement, meaning more direct decision making (Manville and Ober, 2019). On the other hand, the challenges of big data on manageability concern still is a debate (Stevens and Wernimont, 2018) Integration of Health 4.0 ...
Article
Full-text available
In Turkey, a novel concept like Health 4.0 is a potential candidate seeking a solution. This paper aims to identify the scope of Health 4.0 via the perceptions gathered from appropriate vignettes with the focus of IoT stand and with the help of a qualitative approach in the first phase of the hybrid methodology. In the first phase of the study, the authors revealed the drivers and challenges of Health 4.0 by asking for the scope and awareness of Health 4.0. In the second phase of the study, the given replies to the vignettes (possible real-life scenarios) were classified into four main criteria that serve several challenges towards the adoption of Health 4.0, which were evaluated by the MACBETH (Measuring Attractiveness by a Category-Based Evaluation Technique) approach to identify main and sub-challenges towards the concept. In doing so, by analyzing in a multicriteria method, results would help to recheck and undermine the current debates around the Health 4.0 concept, helping to form many applicability levels in the future. The results revealed that security was the most important criteria followed by education, confidentiality, and the politics/manageability criteria as being the least important challenge.
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