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Innovative Approach to Online Argumentation and Models for Structuring the Arguments

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Abstract

Researchers have stressed the importance of argumentation among small groups of students in STEM courses to help them develop deep understanding. But it is not widely used in college courses due to such challenges as finding time in already packed courses, effective organization of argumentation in large classrooms, etc. This paper presents a novel online approach to enable argumentation to be adopted widely.One interesting question we investigated in a junior-level computing course concerned the structure of such arguments. Common experience with online forums in courses suggests that a handful of students dominate them while others hardly participate. So we expected that round-based discussions where each student in the group made one submission in each round, the submission not being available to the others until the start of the next round, would be more effective than forum-based discussions where students made as many submissions as they wished and whenever they wished to, and saw each submission as soon as it was made. But to our surprise, the results showed that both were equally effective! We present the details of our approach, the unexpected results from our course, some hypotheses that may explain the results, and future plans to investigate this further. Full text available at https://swaroop.netlify.app/publication/soundarajan-2018-innovative/soundarajan-2018-innovative.pdf
Innovative Approach to Online Argumentation and
Models for Structuring the Arguments
Neelam Soundarajan
Computer Science & Eng
Ohio State University
Columbus, OH 43210
Email: soundarajan.1@osu.edu
Swaroop Joshi
Computer Science & Eng
Ohio State University
Columbus, OH 43210
Email: joshi.127@osu.edu
Abstract—Researchers have stressed the importance of argu-
mentation among small groups of students in STEM courses to
help them develop deep understanding. But it is not widely used
in college courses due to such challenges as finding time in already
packed courses, effective organization of argumentation in large
classrooms, etc. This paper presents a novel online approach to
enable argumentation to be adopted widely.
One interesting question we investigated in a junior-level
computing course concerned the structure of such arguments.
Common experience with online forums in courses suggests
that a handful of students dominate them while others hardly
participate. So we expected that round-based discussions where
each student in the group made one submission in each round, the
submission not being available to the others until the start of the
next round, would be more effective than forum-based discussions
where students made as many submissions as they wished and
whenever they wished to, and saw each submission as soon as
it was made. But to our surprise, the results showed that both
were equally effective! We present the details of our approach, the
unexpected results from our course, some hypotheses that may
explain the results, and future plans to investigate this further.
I. INTRO DUC TI ON
Argumentation plays a central role in effecting advances
in nearly every STEM discipline. Professionals in such dis-
ciplines as Computer Science engage in vigorous arguments
about different approaches to address specific technical prob-
lems before accepting any particular solution. Online forums
such as stackoverflow provide excellent venues for such dis-
cussions and often host long threads in which professionals
in CS and other disciplines argue the merits/demerits of
alternative approaches to addressing important questions. Not
surprisingly, a number of researchers (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4],
[5], [6]) have stressed the importance of developing the skills
of students in STEM discipline to engage in argumentation.
Much of this work has, however, been at the K-12 level.
Argumentation is even more important for undergraduates in
computing and engineering and other STEM fields as they get
prepared for their professional careers where they can expect
to engage in vigorous arguments not only with the broader
professional communities in their respective disciplines, but
also with other members of their project teams and other
interested constituents to defend their specific choices in
design and implementation projects. Further, argumentation
will help undergraduate students develop deep understanding
of new technical concepts. Indeed, in a real sense, argumen-
tation plays a very similar role in helping students develop
understanding of new concepts as it does in professionals’
online arguments on alternative solutions to new technical
problems. While in the latter case the professional is chal-
lenged to critically consider and debate alternative approaches
to (possibly) stretching the state of the art to address a new
problem, in the former case the student is in the process of
stretching his/her conceptual understanding of the field; and,
as in the professional context, an effective way to help ensure
this is to have the student discuss/debate the topic in question
with peers, i.e., other students, especially those who seem to
have a different conception of the topic.
Prior research has shown that some key requirements must
be met to ensure that argumentation is most productive: The
argumentation must be in small groups of 4–5 students each;
each group must include students with different approaches
to the topic; and the instructor should not participate in the
discussion. The last requirement may seem surprising but it is
critical since, otherwise, the students may simply accept what
the instructor says without careful analysis and the goals of
helping them acquire deep understanding as well as preparing
them for engaging in effective discussions as professionals will
be compromised.
Even if we succeed in meeting these requirements, there
are a number of challenging issues that must be addressed if
argumentation is to be widely used in computing/engineering
courses. First, how would faculty find time in their already
packed courses to accomodate small-group argumentation?
Second, wouldn’t the most vocal students dominate such dis-
cussions while others stay in the background? Third, wouldn’t
stereotypical biases some students may harbor concerning the
abilities of others seriously affect the discussions? Etc.
We have developed a highly innovative approach and online
system, CONSIDER, to address these and other problems. The
name was chosen to stress that students in a group are expected
to carefully consider the positions of the other students and,
possibly, revise or refine their own positions based on those;
it is also an acronym, see below, intended to capture other
aspects that are central to how the system is designed to
function. A CONSIDER discussion starts with the instructor
posting, on the system, a suitable problem. Each student then
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Accepted version
DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2018.8658585
Current e-mail: swaroopjoshi@ieee.org
submits his/her individual answer by a specified deadline.
Next, the instructor uses the system to form groups (typically
consisting of 4 or 5 students each) based on these submissions,
with each group including students with conflicting ideas
about/approaches to the problem; and the discussion begins.
The discussion may be customized in various ways. It may
be specified to be anonymous with students in each group
being labeled S1, S2, S3, S4 or they may know each other’s
identities; the discussion may be organized in a series of
rounds with each student making one submission in each round
and the other students not seeing the submission until the start
of the next round or it may be organized in a more forum-like
manner with each submission becoming available to the group
as soon as it is made; etc. In each case, the student should
specify whether he/she agrees or disagrees with the positions
of each of the students in the group. The name CONSIDER is
an acronym for conflicting student ideas discussed, evaluated,
and resolved (or refuted!). As the acronym suggests, the
central goal is to ensure that students in the group carefully
consider conflicting conceptions held by the other students
in the group and, as appropriate, refine/correct their own
conception of the topic in question.
We should note here that while participating in CONSIDER
discussions will help students develop strong argumentation
skills, that is not the primary goal. After all, when STEM
professionals engage in argumentation, the goal is to arrive
at the most appropriate scientific or technical answer to the
question being discussed, not win the argument as may be the
case in, say, a legal setting. Rather, the goal is to help students
develop deep conceptual understanding while also sharpening
their skills at recognizing and being open to well-justified
technical positions that may differ from their own. This is
not to say that the ability to win debates is not important,
just that CONSIDER-based activities will not contribute to
those abilities. We should also note, as pointed out by one of
the referees, CONSIDER-based activities will not contribute
to developing students’ oral argumentation and presentation
skills. Again, this is not to say that these are not important;
just that other parts of the student’s curriculum, such as in-
class, formal debates in courses focused on professional ethical
issues, will hopefully address these important skills.
We have used CONSIDER in some junior-level computing
courses. One key question that we were interested in inves-
tigating was the most effective way of structuring the argu-
mentation to best help students develop deep understanding.
The reason the question is important is that online discussion
forums used by many faculty to encourage students to engage
in discussions about the course topics have been surprisingly
ineffective, see, e.g., [7], [8]. Often, a handful of students
dominate the forum while others are passive observers or
ignore it altogether. Our hypothesis was that the reason for
this was the way that the forums were structured so that, when
a topic was being discussed, each student made as many or
as few posts to the forum as he/she chose and whenever the
student chose to do so. Further, each post became available to
the entire class as soon as it was made. With this structure, a
common occurrence is for a handful of, often just two, students
to engage in a back-and-forth discussion while the others in
the class, even the interested students, soon lose track of the
key points being discussed.
We proposed an alternative structure, a round-based one, in
which each student in the group is required to make one post in
each round (whose duration will likely depend on the topic in
question and course logistics). The student’s post for a round
will not become available to other students in the group until
after the end of the current round; indeed, the student would
be able to, if he/she wished to do so, edit the post until the
current round ends since no others would have seen the post
until that point. Such a round-based structure rather than the
forum-based structure of discussions, we hypothesized, would
ensure active and engaged participation by all students in the
group and result in better learning.
We tested the hypothesis in a junior-level course of princi-
ples of programming languages (PL). Using the customization
facilities of CONSIDER, we investigated the effectiveness of
the two structures in the context of two (fairly typical) topics
in the course. To our surprise, the results showed that that
both were equally effective. In Section II, we summarize the
framework underlying the approach and other related work.
In Section III, we describe the CONSIDER system; as we
explain, the system was developed over several semesters,
following the methodology of design-based research. In Sec-
tion IV, we present our research question, the experimental
design that we used in the principles of PL course, and the
unexpected results we obtained. In Section V, we discuss the
results, present some hypotheses that may explain our results,
and future plans to investigate this further; we also summarize
our plans for future evolution of the CONSIDER system.
II. BAC KG RO UN D A ND THE ORE TIC AL FR AME WO RK
Socio-cognitive conflict, a key concept underlying the CON-
SIDER system, originates in Piaget’s classic work [9] on
children’s learning. The key point of Piaget’s theory was that
peer interaction is a potent component of a learner’s grasp
of new concepts. In particular, socio-cognitive conflict, i.e.,
disagreements with other learners’ conception of the same
problem or topic and interaction with peers to resolve the
disagreements is fundamental since it highlights alternatives
to the learner’s own conception. In resolving the conflict, the
learner is forced to consider and evaluate these alternatives
on equal terms. Note that a teacher is not involved except,
possibly, as an observer. This is critical since, as noted earlier,
if a teacher were to participate in the discussion, the learners
are likely to simply accept what the teacher says without
careful analysis, thereby compromising the depth of learning.
As Howe and Tolmie [10] put it, “conceptual growth depends
on equilibriation, that is the reconciliation of conflicts between
prior and newly experienced conceptions”.
Although Piaget was concerned mainly with the intellectual
growth of children, his ideas are very relevant for adult learners
as well, including undergraduate STEM students. Indeed,
resolving socio-cognitive conflicts should be more effective for
college students than for young children since college students
may be more capable than young children of analyzing and
evaluating others’ ideas that might conflict with their own.
And given the serious problem of misconceptions harbored
by students in many STEM disciplines that researchers have
investigated, see, e.g., [11], an approach that may help address
such misconceptions is clearly worth pursuing.
A different approach, one that has been commonly used,
to trigger cognitive conflict is for the instructor to present
anomalous data, i.e., data that conflicts with the students’ prior
misconceptions. The expectation is that the conflict between
the presented information and the student’s prior conception
will trigger disequilibrium and cause the student to revise
his/her conception. But Chinn and Brewer’s work [12] showed
that this approach failed to trigger conceptual change in a
large majority of college students in STEM courses. Given the
authority of the teacher, many of the students seem to simply
accept whatever the teacher says without much analysis. As a
result, deep down, there was no real conceptual change. To put
it differently, in cases where a student’s understanding conflicts
with the explanation provided by the instructor, the student
simply accepts the explanation without critical evaluation. By
contrast, when the (cognitive) conflict is between a given
student’s conceptualization of the topic and those of her peers,
the student is forced to evaluate the alternatives critically
and pick one1after careful deliberation since, as far as the
student knows, she, rather than the peer, may be the one whose
explanation is correct!
It may be useful to note the important distinction between
this approach and Vygotsky’s notion of zone of proximal
development (ZPD) [13]. ZPD stresses the importance of a
more competent other” in the interaction; thus, according to
Vygotsky, interaction is most fruitful when one of the members
of the group is more competent than the others and can help the
other members move beyond their current abilities (into their
ZPD). Interestingly, while some researchers have confirmed
the importance of Vygotsky’s “more competent other”, the
results of other researchers (see, e.g., [14]) suggest that what
matters most is the cognitive conflict that a student experiences
because of disagreements with other students’ conception of
the same problem or topic. In any case, the approach in
CONSIDER is based on socio-cognitive conflict, not ZPD.
It is also worth noting that in the last two decades or more,
there has been considerable focus on collaborative learning in
STEM education. Thus, e.g., team projects in capstone design
courses are often considered an essential part of undergraduate
engineering programs. While collaborative learning is indeed
important, it is not directly relevant to our work since it does
not, for the most part, involve students in a team trying to
resolve cognitive conflicts. Indeed, students in such teams
often go out of their way to not criticize the ideas offered
by other members of the team for fear of offending them.
1More commonly, the student will revise her original conception incorpo-
rating ideas from other students’ conceptions rather than simply abandoning
her original conception and picking one of the others.
Driver et al. [1] make a strong case for argumentation
as a central component of STEM education. To quote, “[a]s
argument is a central feature of the resolution of scientific
controversies, it is somewhat surprising that science teaching
has paid so little attention to a practice that lies at the heart
of science. It is our contention that this significant omission
has led to important shortcoming s . . . if science education
is to help young people engage with the claims produced
by science-in-the-making, science education must give access
to these forms of argument through promoting appropriate
classroom activities and their associated practices.” Given
that CONSIDER, as we will see, requires students to offer
arguments defending their positions, it has the potential to help
students develop strong argumentation skills. But we should
note that our primary goal is to help students to develop deep
conceptual understanding; the fact that, in the process, they
will develop strong argumentation skills is an added bonus
not the main goal. In Nussbaum’s terms [15], our interest is
in having students “arguing to learn,” not “learning to argue”.
Socio-cognitive conflict is also the primary driving force
behind the in-class peer instruction (PI) technique developed
by Mazur and others [16], [17]. In PI, each student answers a
conceptual multiple choice question submitting the answer via
aclicker or other similar device; then the students turn to their
neighbors and, in groups of 3 or 4, discuss the question; after
a few minutes of discussion, each student again answers the
same question. During the discussion time, the instructor may
walk around the room but does not participate. Mazur reports
that the percentage of students who, following discussion with
their peers, change their answer from a wrong choice to the
correct one far exceeds the percentage who change from the
correct choice to a wrong one. However, there are a number
of limitations with this and similar approaches, mostly related
to the fact that it is a classroom technique, the activity being
interspersed with regular lectures. First, since the topic in ques-
tion was just discussed in the lecture, students may not have
thought about the underlying ideas carefully. Second, there is
no way to ensure that students in a given group include ones
who picked different possible answers because the grouping
is based essentially on where students are seated. Third, some
students, not necessarily the ones with the most developed
understanding of the topic, may dominate their groups; and
any stereotypical biases that students may harbor, perhaps
subconsciously, may also compromise the discussion. Further,
the amount of time spent in the discussion is, naturally,
limited; hence, students who take time to formulate precise
and deliberate arguments may not contribute effectively to the
discussions. As we will see in Section III, the CONSIDER
approach addresses all these problems effectively.
While CSILE [18], perhaps the earliest online approaches
used in science courses was developed before the web, more
recent systems that attempt to have students build knowl-
edge in somewhat similar ways use wikis, see, e.g., [19].
Unfortunately, many of these efforts have not been effective
in improving learning even if wiki-based knowledge-building
efforts outside the classroom have been quite successful, the
best example being the Wikipedia. Thus Cole’s [8] course on
information systems with 75 students in it was organized so
that lectures were in alternate weeks, the other weeks being
intended for students to discover new material and post to the
class wiki and discuss the material. Students were told that
fully one quarter of the questions on the final exam would
be from the material that students posted. The expectation
was that, given this, students would eagerly post content, edit
each other’s posts, and engage in active discussions. Halfway
through the course there had been no posts to the wiki! Leung
and Chu [20] in a course on knowledge management and Judd
et al. [21] in a large course on psychology report equally
poor results of the use of a wiki. Rick and Guzdial [7] report
that although they obtained positive results using wikis in
architecture and english composition classes, the results in
STEM classes were “overwhelmingly disappointing”. Thus
they report that fully 40% of math students settled for a zero
on an assignment rather than engage in such discussions!
Over the last few years, a number of systems specifically
designed to support online argumentation in courses have been
developed, see, [22], [23], [24]. Many of these, though, are
part of larger systems intended to help students, for example
in high-school chemistry classes, to engage in collaborative
knowledge construction, following principles of construction-
ism. As such, they often include elaborate graphical (and,
often, video) facilities to enable students to engage in the nec-
essary experimentation, literature search, etc. The entire course
is often designed around the system in question. By contrast,
CONSIDER is intended for use in standard undergraduate
computing and engineering courses to help students develop
deeper conceptual understanding of the concepts and topics
presented in lectures in the course in the standard fashion.
III. CONSID ER AP PROAC H AND SY ST E M
Design-based research (DBR) is an effective approach for
both research and design of technology-based or technology-
enhanced learning environments; see, for example, the paper
by Wang and Hannafin [25] for a review of the topic. Roughly
speaking, in DBR, the researchers start with an educational
theory, design a system/intervention informed by the theory,
try it in practice, and, based on the results, revise the sys-
tem/intervention in an iterative cycle. This is the approach
we have adopted in our work. As described earlier, socio-
cognitive conflict among learners and how its resolution can
drive the development of deep understanding among them
provides the theoretical basis for the CONSIDER approach.
We built a prototype system and over a few semesters of use
in CS courses, on the basis of feedback from instructors and
students, revised and refined it in an iterative cycle.
We will use an example from our Software Engineering
(SE) course to illustrate the overall structure of a CONSIDER
activity. This is a typical SE course, taken by juniors/seniors
majoring in Computer Science. A main goal of the course
is to help students recognize the importance of a systematic
approach to understanding the overall domain in which the
software system to be built is intended to operate, understand
the problem that the system will help address, and the solution
approach to be adopted in the system. Quite often, however,
students want to jump straight into designing and coding the
software system without going through a careful analysis of
the domain, the problem in the context of the domain, etc.
Indeed, frequently there is confusion between the domain
problem and specific algorithmic or data-structure related
problems that might be encountered when developing the
software system. The problem below is intended to help tease
out such misunderstandings.
Homework: Your team has been asked to build a campus
wayfinding system to help visually impaired students on the
campus. Five items identified during analysis are listed belw.
Identify which category of analysis –that is, domain, problem,
or solution– each element falls under. Briefly explain why.
1) A catalog of the types of building on a college campus;
2) The list of hard-to-find buildings on campus;
3) The range of visual and cognitive impairments that
people suffer from;
4) Strategies by which people find their way in an unknown
area, e.g., asking passers-by or identifying major streets.
Item (3) is especially interesting. Many students think it falls
under the problem category. In fact, however, it is part of
the domain as it provides information about the range of
impairments people suffer from. The software system, after
all, is not intended to solve the problem of visual impairments
(e.g., by controlling an artificial eye to help the person see).
Different students come up with different answers and with
different justifications. The standard approach is to have a
discussion on the question in class, typically in the same class
period as the one in which the graded homeworks are returned
to the students. The class discussion helps some students,
but others remain unclear about the distinction between the
notions of domain, problem, and solution. In the CONSIDER
approach, following the lectures on the topic, the instructor
posts the problem on the CONSIDER web-app.2She also
specifies –in addition to other items, see below– a deadline
by which each student must submit his3answer. The problem
may be similar to or the same as one above but we will assume
there is only one question, item (3) above.4
Once the instructor has posted the homework, each student
receives an email from the app asking him to log into the
system and answer the question. The app will require the
student to make a specific choice (“domain” or “problem” or
“solution”) and to include a brief justification as part of the
2In previous versions of the system, we had implemented it as an Android
app since we felt students would find it easier to work with as most students
use their smartphones frequently each day. But while it was true that students
did indeed use their phones frequently, participating in a CONSIDER discus-
sion was quite a challenge using a smartphone because of the small screen
size, lack of keyboard, and various distractions that are all too commmon on
such phones. Hence we have re-implemented the system as a web-app.
3In the interest of readability, we use female pronouns when referring to
instructors and male pronouns for students.
4Later in the paper, we will argue that the structure of the problem as stated
above is, in fact, preferable to one in which only item (3) is included.
Submit
Initial Submission
Visual and cognitive impairments contribute to users’ inability to find their destination
(the problem).
Scenario: Your team has been asked to build a campus way finding system to help
visually impaired students on campus. Identify what category of analysis the following
item, identified during analysis, falls under. Justify your answer.
The range of physical and cognitive impairments that people suffer from.
Time left: 04:35:42
Domain
Problem
Solution
Fig. 1. Initial submission from a student (wrong answer)
answer. We refer to this as the student’s initial submission.
Fig. 1 shows the initial submission made by one of the
students; this student indeed has a misconception and thinks
the specified item belongs to the Problem category. Two points
should be noted. First, no groups have yet been formed,
thus each initial submission is made by an individual student
and reflects that student’s (initial/current) conception of the
problem. Second, after making the submission, the student is
free to log in again as many times as he wishes (until the time
of the deadline) and modify the submission in any manner;
the system will retain, for each student, only the last version
submitted by that student before the deadline.
Once the deadline expires, the system will (try to) auto-
matically form groups of 4 or 5 students each with each
group containing students who chose different answers. If
most students make the same choices, the instructor will
have to form the groups based on differences in the students’
justifications. We will return to this issue later in the paper,
but we note here that the app allows the instructor to specify a
“buffer” period (typically several hours) between the deadline
for the students’ initial submissions and the start of the next
phase, i.e., the discussion portion of the activity to provide the
instructor adequate time to log into the app and form these
groups “by hand” if necessary.5
When the discussion phase begins, the app will send another
email to each student indicating that the discussion phase
had started, so he should log in and start participating in
the discussion.6Before considering how the discussion takes
place, we should note that when the instructor creates the
assignment on the app, she will also specify various important
aspects of the discussion such as whether the discussion will
5If the approach is to be adopted for large classes, possibly even MOOCs,
it would not be possible for the instructor to have to form the groups by-hand.
In the final section, we will consider how this problem might be addressed.
6The app also allows students to see, any time after the initial posting of
the activity, the start-time and end-time for each phase of the activity so this
email simply serves as a reminder.
Submit
Welcome, S2!
Hey all, My thinking was that knowing users’ limitations helps to craft a solution, but
only insomuch as that knowledge lets us more clearly understand the problem we’re
trying to overcome.
Initial Submissions
Option selected: (2) Problem
Visual and cognitive impairments contribute to users’ inability to find their destination (the
problem).
S2
Option selected: (1) Domain
Because this system is directed toward visually impaired individuals, understanding their
situation is needed to address the problems they face.
S1
Time left to complete current discussion: 01 days 11:51:11
Fig. 2. Student S2’s Round1submission
be forum-based or round-based; whether it will be anonymous,
so that students in each group will know each other as S1, S2
etc. or students will see the identities of the other students in
the group; the deadline for each phase of the activity; in the
case of round-based discussions, this will include specifying
the number of rounds and the deadline for each round.
For our current example, let us assume that the instructor
has chosen the discussion to be anonymous and round-based.
In a round-based discussion, each round will be of a fixed
duration. During each round, each student is required to make
one post before the deadline for the round expires; but, as
in the case of the initial submission, the student may log in
as many times as he chooses before the deadline and edit
her post as she chooses; and, as in that case, only the most
recent version of the post will be saved. In our experience, a
duration of 24 hours per round seems ideal. It allows students
sufficient time to correct any mistakes they might make when
making a submission for a given round, and it also accounts
for the varying time schedules of undergraduate students who
often juggle school, work, and family commitments. Also in
our experience, the appropriate number of rounds for typical
homeworks in courses in computing at this level seems to be
one or two. In any case, the app allows the instructor to tweak
these parameters to suit the particular course and the nature
of the homework and her own and the students’ preferences.
Suppose the student whose initial submission is shown
in Fig. 1 has been assigned (either automatically or by the
instructor) to a particular group G and that this group has
three other students. Since this is an anonymous discussion,
the system will assign the labels S1, S2, S3, S4 to the four
students. Let us assume that the system has assigned the label
S2 to our particular student. We will label the rounds in the
discussion, Round1,Round2, etc. For convenience, we will
also refer to the initial submission round as Round0.
When S2 logs in, once Round1begins, he is presented with
the initial answers submitted by each student in G (including
himself), Fig. 2. For lack of space, only the initial answers of
S1 and S2 (the current student) appear in the screenshot; S2
will be able to see the answers submitted by S3 and S4 by
scrolling down as needed in the central window. Note that S1
has submitted the correct answer. The hope is that when S2
reads this correct answer, he will resolve the resulting conflict
by correcting his own misconception.
At the bottom of the screen is a window where S2 is ex-
pected to type in his post for the current round. Unfortunately,
S2 did not understand the rationale behind S1’s answer and,
therefore, in his post for the current round, tries to justify his
incorrect conception. A couple of points should be noted. The
other students in the group, S1, S3, S4 may also be logged
in at the same time and working on their Round1posts; some
may have already made those posts; others may not yet have
logged in for this rould. In none of these cases, this being a
round-based discussion, will any of the students see the posts
that any of the others in the group may have made for the
current round. This allows students to work at their own pace
and, since a student can log in again (multiple times, if he
chooses) and edit his post for the current round; e.g., S2 might,
before the end of this round, suddenly realize the mistake in
his conception, log in again, and modify his answer.
Fig. 2 shows the style used in a previous version of CON-
SIDER. That version did not require the student to specifically
indicate whether he agreed with or disagreed with the answers
posted by the other students in the group. Although S2, judging
from his post in the figure, has indeed read and considered S1’s
post, we were troubled by the possibility that some students
may not be carefully reading or considering the posts of
the other students and may be just repeating their previous
positions. Hence we revised the app to include, next to the
previous-round post of each student, three buttons reading
Agree”, “Disagree”, or “Neutral”. S2 is now required to click
one of these buttons to indicate that he agrees with all/most
of the main points expressed in that particular previous-round
post (by clicking the green “Agree” button), or he disagrees
with one or more key points in that post (by clicking the
red “Disagree” button), or he did not understand one or
more key points in that post (by clicking the blue “Neutral”
button). His selection is reflected in the app with some visual
aid: the background of the author’s alias changes to the
respective color (green, red, or blue for agree, disagree, or
neutral, respectively), and an icon thumbs-up, thumbs-down,
or question-mark, respectively, appears under it. An example
can be seen in Fig. 3.
Fig. 3 shows S2’s Round2post in this version of the app.
At this point, S2 has indeed understood the rationale for S1’s
position and recognized the correctness of that postion. Thus
S2 is required to consider posts made by each student in the
group G in the previous round and analyze its relation to
his current position. S2 has to do this for his own post as
well from that round. This is important because S2 may find
the post(s) of one (or more) of the other students from the
previous round so compelling that he changes his mind and
no longer agrees with what he said in the previous round!
Fig. 3. Student S2’s Round2submission
S2’s current-round post which he types into the window at the
bottom provides an explanation for why he no longer agrees
with his previous position. Note the fundamental difference
with a typical debate where such a change of position would
be considered a defeat for S2 rather than, as is the case
here, the purpose of the activity. The final submission round,
whose details we omit, starts at the end of the last discussion
round. Each student is required to, individually, submit his
final answer to the question along with a brief justification
relating it to the positions of the other students in his group.
Before concluding this section, we note one other point.
One question that some students in the course raised during an
informal class discussion on CONSIDER was, what happens
if a given group is not able to arrive at a common conclusion?
Indeed, just this question was also raised by one of the
anonymous referees of the paper. The point is that arriving at
a group consensus is not a goal of a CONSIDER activity; that
may, indeed, happen but it is not a goal of the activity. Instead,
the goal is to have each student in the group carefully analyze
the opinions of each of the other students in the group and,
if necessary, revise/refine his/her approach to the problem and
to be able to explain/justify any changes so that each student
in the group develops as deep an understanding of the topic
as possible. We should also note that the situation may well
be different in a professional project team, especially one with
looming deadlines; in such a situation, the team may indeed
have to reach a consensus on the approach to be adopted.
IV. EXP E RI MEN TAL RE SULTS
Section III focused on the rounds-based approach for the
discussion phase of the activity. The alternative, as described
earlier, is the forum-based approach in which each student
posts as frequently or infrequently as he/she chooses and the
post becomes available to the group as soon as it is made;
and a key research question we were interested in was:
TABLE I
SUM MARY O F IN ITI AL A ND FI NAL S UBM ISS ION SC ORES
Activity Expt. condition NSubmission Median Mean
Round-based (H1) 11 Initial 2.000 2.091
Final 2.500 2.409
A1
Forum-based (H2) 11 Initial 3.000 2.545
Final 3.500 3.136
Round-based (H2) 11 Initial 2.000 2.364
Final 3.000 3.000
A2
Forum-based (H1) 14 Initial 2.500 2.429
Final 3.000 2.929
R1: Is the rounds-based approach more effective than
the forum-based approach in enabling students to de-
velop conceptual understanding?
We investigated this in a junior-level course on the concepts
of programming languages, taken by most of our CS-majors.
We divided the class of about 40 students randomly into two
roughly equal halves, H1 and H2. Two activities, A1and A2,
related to topics discussed in the course, were assigned to all
students, each activity being assigned in the days following
the respective class discussions.7Students in H1 went through
the A1activity using the rounds-based approach and the A2
activity using the forum-based approach; those in H2 went
through A2using the rounds-based approach and A2using
the forum-based approach. Nearly all students in the class
consented to having data from their work, after anonymization,
to be used as part of our research study. But we have included
in our analysis data from only those who posted both the
initial and the final submission for the given activity. Due to
various external reasons, like conflict with assignments from
other classes, some students could not submit either the initial
or the final answer, and were excluded from the analysis.
The course instructor, one of the current authors, developed
a simple 4-point rubric to assess the correctness of the answers
submitted by individual students in the initial and final sub-
mission for each activity. Without going into the details of the
rubric (which depend on the specific technical programming
language concepts that the activities were based on), a score of
1 meant that the student’s answer was wrong and, moreover,
did not mention any relevant interesting points; a score of 2
meant the answer was still wrong but the student offered an
interesting explanation; etc.
Table I shows a summary of these measures across the two
activities and experimental conditions. As explained above, for
activity A1, the H1 half of the class participated in the rounds-
based discussion, while the other half, H2, participated in the
forum-based discussion. Each student individually submitted
7The topics in question are fairly standard for courses on programming
language concepts at the junior level. A1dealt with subtype/inheritance-based
polymorphism in OO languages such as Java. A2concerned the nature of
variables in functional languages such as (pure) Lisp or Haskell.
TABLE II
SUM MA RY OF GAI N SC OR ES
Activity Structure Median gain Mean gain
A1Round-based 0.5000 0.7727
Forum-based 0.5000 0.5909
A2Round-based 0.5000 0.6364
Forum-based 0.5000 0.5000
an answer to the question before and after the discussion. The
course instructor then evaluated these answers on the 4-point
scale discussed above (Initial and Final scores in the table,
respectively). The last two columns of the table show the
median and mean of these scores for the halves H1 and H2
under each experimental condition. The difference between the
score for the initial submission of a given student for a given
activity and the score for the same student’s final submission
was our measure of the activity’s contribution to the stu-
dent’s understanding of the particular topic. We first analyzed
whether the discussion interventions –round-based or forum-
based– have any statistically significant effect on the students’
understanding. Shapiro-Wilk normality test on each of the
8 metrics indicated that the data is not normally distributed
(p < .05). Therefore, we used the Wilcoxon signed-rank test,
a non-parametric equivalent of the one-tailed t-test for within-
subject data. The analysis showed that the final submission
scores were significantly higher than the corresponding initial
submission scores in all the four conditions: A1Round-based
with group H1 (N= 11,p < .05,r=.86), A1Forum-based
with group H2 (N= 11,p < .05,r=.77), A2Round-based
with group H1 (N= 14,p < .05,r=.87), and A2Forum-
based with group H2 (N= 11,p < .05,r=.77). These
results indicate that both discussion structures resulted in a
significant improvement in students’ understanding.
Turning to the research question mentioned above, our
hypothesis was the rounds-based discussion will be more
effective than the forum-based discussion. To evaluate this hy-
pothesis, we performed a gain-score analysis by comparing the
mean gain (difference between the final submission and initial
submission score) under one condition (round-based) with the
mean gain in learning in the other condition (forum-based)
for a given activity. Table II summarizes the improvement in
learning from the initial submission to the final submission for
each activity, first in the round-based structure and then in the
forum-based structure, observed in each condition. Once again
Shapiro-Wilk normality test showed that the gain vectors are
not normal either (p < .05), so we used the non-parametric
Wilcoxon rank sum test, which is a nonparametric equivalent
of the t-test for between-subject data. The analysis, however,
showed that there was no significant difference in improvement
in learning in the two conditions on either activity (p > .05).
This was rather surprising since we had expected that the
round-based approach would be more effective in improving
student understanding than the much-less structured forum-
based approach. Of course, this is only one experiment and
we plan to repeat it but, nevertheless, the result was surprising.
In the final section, we consider some possible explanations
and our plans for investigating this further.
V. DI SC USS IO N A ND FU T UR E WORK
Assuming that further experimentation confirms the result
reported in the previous section that round-based and forum-
based discussions are equally effective, each being fairly
effective in improving student understanding of the topic,
why is that? Doesn’t that contradict the experience of various
authors we mentioned earlier, e.g., [7]? One possible reason
is the fact that our activities were in small groups of students,
typically four students each. A second possible factor might
be the fact that students in our group (for both activities, in
both conditions) were anonymous.
But we believe that the most important reason might be the
fact that our groups were heterogeneous, i.e., they consisted of
students with different understandings of the topic. This was,
of course, the central point of Piaget’s theory of learning driven
by socio-cognitive conflict. It is this conflict that forces the
student to consider and evaluate the alternative explanations
on equal terms. We plan to investigate this in future work;
the approach would be to have half of the class work on an
activity with the groups in this half being formed based on
conflicting approaches to the problem, these conflicts being
identified on the basis of their initial submissions; and have
the second half of the class work on the same activity but the
groups in this half being formed at random. A comparison of
the results across these two conditions should help shed light
on the question.
Formation of conflicting groups, however, is not always
an easy task. The particular software-engineering problem
is perhaps an exception because the question of whether
a given item belongs to the domain category, the problem
category, or the solution category turns out to be challenging
for many students encountering this concept. As a result,
it is usually fairly straightforward to form such groups but
this is not often the case. We have been exploring possible
ways to help with this situation. One possibility is suggested
by the original version of the software-engineering problem
we considered; i.e., have the student, at least in the initial
submission, consider which category each of the four elements
listed near the start of Section 3, rather than just one of
them as we did in our detailed discussion in that section.
That would enable differences between the students to emerge
more easily. Indeed, an approach such as this would be
essential if the approach is to be applied to large courses
including, possibly, MOOCs. For such courses, the possibility
of having the instructor form the groups “by-hand” would be
an unacceptable burden, at least as it concerns the amount of
“buffer time” that would be needed between when the students
make their initial submission and when the discussion portion
of the activity begins. We plan to implement this facility
in CONSIDER and study its effectiveness in helping form
conflicting groups.
Before concluding, we mention one other important point.
In the current version of CONSIDER, in their final submis-
sions, students essentially address the same problem as they
did in the initial submission and in the discussion in their
group. This raises the important question: how can we be sure
that what is happening is not simply that after the discussion,
it is easy to see, even for students who started with little
understanding, which of the answers proposed by the different
students is correct and which incorrect? Indeed, one could
argue that this is an especially significant problem for STEM
disciplines because here, unlike in social science topics, there
is generally one “correct answer”8. We adapted this approach
since we had received informal feedback from the students
to the effect that posing a different problem for the final
submission would substantially increase the amount of work
they were expected to complete for the course; and given all
the other pressures on undergraduate students, this seemed
a legitimate concern. Neverthelss, given the question that it
raises, it would seem useful to have the student address, in
the final submission, a different problem, but still one that is
very much related to the topic of the original problem, rather
than the same as that one. Such an approach will provide
definitive evidence of how any particular activity does or does
not contribute to the students’ conceptual understanding. As
for the students’ concern regarding the amount of work they
would have to put in, we will have to appropriately adjust
other components of the course to address this.
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... Argumentation skills will sharpen and enhance HOTs which includes critical thinking. The quality of the argument that students can articulate reflects the quality of the learning they master [23]- [25]. ...
... In online learning, each student or group of students gets the same and widest opportunity to express their thoughts without anyone who dominate as in the offline learning [29]. It makes online learning more effective in encouraging the high ability of students in their DA performance than offline learning [25]. In e-learning students can assimilate information as well as or even better than students who study in the traditional way [30] and has proven to be effective especially in the case of shy, easily intimidated, and slow learners who usually do not have the courage to speak and express in the traditional offline classroom [31]. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Piaget's classic work on cognitive development showed that engaging learners in critical discussions with peers about ideas that are different than theirs leads to deep conceptual understanding. Implementing such an approach in college-level STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) courses has some specific challenges: (a) Short meeting times and large class sizes; (b) Competitive nature of the courses and single answer questions on assignments and exams; and (c) Overall lack of collaborative learning culture where students are unsure of how to seek help and many faculty members tend to think that engaging in collaborative activities may affect content coverage; etc. Based on Piaget's theory, I have developed a highly innovative collaborative-learning approach that exploits specific affordances of web technologies to address these challenges. This approach, named CONSIDER, short for CONflicting Student Ideas Discussed Evaluated and Resolved, allows creation of small groups of students with different ideas about the topic in question, engages them in a highly-structured rounds-based discussion so that the group progresses at an equitable pace, and makes their submissions anonymous to others so that students can receive the comments without any preconceived notions they may have about the poster. While a number of researchers have explored approaches to collaborative-learning, a key difference with this work is that my focus is helping individual students develop their own understanding, whereas the focus of much of this other work is on developing students' team skills, effective communication abilities, and the like. While a discussion in CONSIDER is always among small groups of students, typically 4 students in each group, with each group consisting of students with distinct conceptions of the topic being discussed, the discussion may be organized as either a rounds-based discussion or a forum-based discussion. In a rounds-based discussion, the discussion takes place in a series of rounds, each of specified duration with each student in the group making exactly one post in each round; the student's post is not available to the other students in the group until the end of round; indeed, each student will be able to freely edit her post until the end of the round. The other possibility is to have the discussion organized in a forum-based manner where each student makes as many or as few posts as she chooses and each post becomes visible to all the students in the group as soon as it is made. In addition, the discussion may be either anonymous with the students in the group being known to the others in the group as simply S1, S2, etc., or they may know each other's identities. Since the default setting in the CONSIDER system is rounds-based and anonymous, I will use the term "CONSIDER-approach" to refer to this type of discussion. A platform independent responsive web application was developed to implement this approach and to compare it with the forum-based approach. This app was used in three offerings of two junior/senior level undergraduate Computer Science and Engineering courses at The Ohio State University, where one discussion was conducted using the forum-based approach and the other using the CONSIDER approach in each class. Students performance on the pre- and post-discussion question and participation of individual students was measured. In two of the studies, a significant difference was found in the discussion that used the CONSIDER approach, compared to the forum-based approach on both these measures: improvement in learning (Study 1: N=37, r=-.63, p<.05; Study 2: N=26, r=-.38, p<.05) and participation (Study 1: r=-.57, p<.05; Study 2: r=-.76, p<.05). In the third study, there was no significant effect on the post-activity scores (p=.37), and the participation in the two types of discussions did not differ significantly, either (r=-.20, p=.09). In an anonymous, optional post-activity survey, a majority of the students self reported that they found the rounds-based structure (55%) and anonymity (80%) to be helpful in their participation and learning.
Conference Paper
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Piaget's classic work on how children learn showed that when learners engage in critical discussions with peers who have ideas that conflict with their own, that contributes effectively to their developing deep understanding of the concepts involved. Building on this foundation, we have developed a novel and powerful approach to collaborative learning that exploits the power of on-line technologies to enable engineering-more generally, STEM-students to develop thorough understanding of technical topics through collaborative learning. Our approach, as we show, has a number of important advantages over most approaches to face-to-face collaborative learning. We have implemented a prototype web app, CONSIDER, based on our approach and used it in two Computer Science and Engineering courses: a graduate level theory of programming languages course, and an undergrad principles of programming languages course. It was very well received, with 15 out of 22 students in the grad course, and 13 out of 21 students in the undergrad course indicating, in a post-discussion survey, that the approach provided them a better opportunity to learn compared in-class discussions. We present a summary of the survey results, along with the theoretical underpinnings of the approach and some details of the prototype implementation. We also present our design for the next set of experiments with the CONSIDER tool.
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Many researchers have stressed the importance of *argumentation* in STEM education to enable students to develop deep understanding. This work has mostly been at the K-12 level, but argumentation is even more important for undergraduates in computing and engineering. Not only will argumentation help students master the concepts, it will also better prepare them for their professional careers where they can expect to engage in vigorous arguments about trade-offs in various possible approaches to addressing problems in their projects. Prior research has shown that some key requirements must be met to ensure that argumentation is most productive: The argumentation must be in small groups of 4--5 students each; each group must include students with different approaches to the topic; and the instructor should *not* participate in the discussion. The last requirement may seem surprising but it is critical since, otherwise, the students are likely to simply accept what the instructor says and the goal of helping them achieve deep understanding will be compromised. But there are challenging issues that must be addressed if argumentation is to be widely used in computing/engineering courses. First, how would faculty find time in their already packed courses to accommodate small-group argumentation to any serious extent? Second, wouldn't the most vocal students dominate such discussions while others stay in the background? Third, wouldn't preconceived biases some may harbor concerning the abilities of others seriously affect the discussions? Etc. We have developed a highly innovative approach and online system, CONSIDER, to address these and other problems. A CONSIDER discussion starts with the instructor posting, on the system, a suitable problem. Each student then submits her individual answer by a specified deadline. Next, the instructor uses the system to form groups based on these submissions and the discussion begins. The discussion may be customized in various ways: the discussion may be specified to be anonymous with students in each group being labeled S1, S2, S3, S4 or they may know each other's identities; the discussion may be organized in a series of *rounds* with each student making one submission in each round and the other students not seeing the submission until the start of the next round or it may be organized in a more forum-like manner with each submission becoming available to the group as soon as it is made; etc. In each case, the student is required to explicitly specify whether she agrees or disagrees with the positions of the others in the group. We have used CONSIDER in some junior-level courses in computing and the results were quite positive as were student reactions. In this paper, we present the results from a current junior-level course on programming language principles, summarize the lessons learned, and ideas for improvements. We also summarize online argumentation systems developed by some other researchers. One important difference is that whereas these other researchers focus on developing students' argumentation abilities, we focus on using argumentation to help students master computing/engineering concepts and approaches.
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Piaget's classic work on cognitive development showed that engaging learners in critical discussions with peers about ideas that are different than theirs leads to deep conceptual understanding. Implementing such an approach in computer science and, more generally, STEM, courses has some specific challenges. Based on Piaget's theory, we have developed a highly innovative collaborative learning approach that exploits specific affordances of web technologies to address these challenges. It allows small groups of students with different ideas about the topic in question, to engage in a highly-structured discussion that enables each student in the group to develop deep understanding. While a number of researchers have explored approaches to collaborative learning, a key difference with our work is that our focus is helping individual students develop deep understanding, whereas the focus of much of this other work is on developing students' team skills, effective communication abilities, and the like. We have tested our approach in an undergraduate CS course and the effect on student performance was encouraging; moreover, about two-thirds of the students in the course, based on a post-activity survey, felt that the approach was effective in helping them develop conceptual understanding. https://swaroop.netlify.app/publication/joshi-2016-enabl/
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Collaborative learning is a key component of software engineering (SE) courses in most undergraduate computing curricula. Thus these courses include fairly intensive team projects, the intent being to ensure that not only do students develop an understanding of key software engineering concepts and practices, but also develop the skills needed to work effectively in large design and development teams. But there is a definite risk in collaborative learning in that there is a potential that individual learning gets lost in the focus on the team’s success in completing the project (s). While the team’s success is indeed the primary goal of an industrial SE team, ensuring individual learning is obviously an essential goal of SE courses. We have developed a novel approach that exploits the affordances of mobile and web technologies to help ensure that individual students in teams in SE courses develop a thorough understanding of the relevant concepts and practices while working on team projects, indeed, that the team contributes in an essential manner to the learning of each member of the team. We describe the learning theory underlying our approach, provide some details concerning the prototype implementation of a tool based on the approach, and describe how we are using it in an SE course in our program. Full-text: https://swaroop.netlify.app/publication/soundarajan-2015-collab-cooper/
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Conflict and cooperation would seem to be ideas that are diametrically opposed to each other. But, in fact, classic work by Piaget on how children and adults learn shows that when learners engage with peers in critical discussion of ideas concerning which they have different understandings, that contributes very effectively to learners developing deep understanding of the concepts involved. At the same time, getting students in undergraduate computing (or other technical/engineering) courses to engage with other students in thoughtful discussion of important concepts is very challenging. It can be especially difficult to get women students and students from other underrepresented groups to participate effectively in such discussions. In our work, we exploit the affordances of mobile and web technologies to address these challenges. Our approach not only helps address these challenges, it has a number of other important advantages over face-to-face discussions. We present the theoretical underpinnings of the approach, some details of our prototype implementation, preliminary results from the use of the prototype in a junior/senior level class on Software Engineering, and the design for the next version of our tool. We also discuss the possibilities and usefulness of applying this approach in a range of computing courses from traditional classrooms to MOOCs.
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The flipped classroom is widely regarded as an excellent approach to exploit the affordances of digital and on-line technologies to actively engage students and improve learning. The traditional lectures "covering" course content are moved to on-line videos accessible to students before the class meetings, with the class meeting times being devoted mostly to discussion and application of the new ideas, and other active learning tasks. The expectation has been that this will make the courses much more effective and students will be able to achieve the intended course outcomes to a much greater extent than in the traditional classroom. But the results have been disappointing. Although students find the flipped classroom engaging, student achievement of course learning outcomes, as reported by most researchers who have used the approach, has been roughly the same as in traditional classes. How do we tailor the flipped classroom to achieve its full potential? That is the question our workin- progress attempts to address. The thesis underlying our approach, based on classic work in the area of how people learn, is that it is not enough to have students watch the on-line videos before the class meeting. They should also engage in serious, structured discussions with other students, and thoughtfully consider ideas that may conflict with their own understanding of the topic in question both in order to help them develop a deeper understanding of the topic and in order to highlight problem areas that need further elaboration by the instructor. We discuss the theoretical basis behind the work, provide some details of the prototype implementation of an on-line tool that enables such structured discussions, and describe our plans for using it in an undergraduate course on software engineering and for assessing the approach.
Thesis
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Piaget's classic work on cognitive development showed that engaging learners in critical discussions with peers about ideas that are different than theirs leads to deep conceptual understanding. Implementing such an approach in college-level STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) courses has some specific challenges: (a) Short meeting times and large class sizes; (b) Competitive nature of the courses and single answer questions on assignments and exams; and (c) Overall lack of collaborative learning culture where students are unsure of how to seek help and many faculty members tend to think that engaging in collaborative activities may affect content coverage; etc. Based on Piaget's theory, I have developed a highly innovative collaborative-learning approach that exploits specific affordances of web technologies to address these challenges. This approach, named CONSIDER, short for CONflicting Student Ideas Discussed Evaluated and Resolved, allows creation of small groups of students with different ideas about the topic in question, engages them in a highly-structured rounds-based discussion so that the group progresses at an equitable pace, and makes their submissions anonymous to others so that students can receive the comments without any preconceived notions they may have about the poster. While a number of researchers have explored approaches to collaborative-learning, a key difference with this work is that my focus is helping individual students develop their own understanding, whereas the focus of much of this other work is on developing students' team skills, effective communication abilities, and the like. While a discussion in CONSIDER is always among small groups of students, typically 4 students in each group, with each group consisting of students with distinct conceptions of the topic being discussed, the discussion may be organized as either a rounds-based discussion or a forum-based discussion. In a rounds-based discussion, the discussion takes place in a series of rounds, each of specified duration with each student in the group making exactly one post in each round; the student's post is not available to the other students in the group until the end of round; indeed, each student will be able to freely edit her post until the end of the round. The other possibility is to have the discussion organized in a forum-based manner where each student makes as many or as few posts as she chooses and each post becomes visible to all the students in the group as soon as it is made. In addition, the discussion may be either anonymous with the students in the group being known to the others in the group as simply S1, S2, etc., or they may know each other's identities. Since the default setting in the CONSIDER system is rounds-based and anonymous, I will use the term "CONSIDER-approach" to refer to this type of discussion. A platform independent responsive web application was developed to implement this approach and to compare it with the forum-based approach. This app was used in three offerings of two junior/senior level undergraduate Computer Science and Engineering courses at The Ohio State University, where one discussion was conducted using the forum-based approach and the other using the CONSIDER approach in each class. Students performance on the pre- and post-discussion question and participation of individual students was measured. In two of the studies, a significant difference was found in the discussion that used the CONSIDER approach, compared to the forum-based approach on both these measures: improvement in learning (Study 1: N=37, r=-.63, p<.05; Study 2: N=26, r=-.38, p<.05) and participation (Study 1: r=-.57, p<.05; Study 2: r=-.76, p<.05). In the third study, there was no significant effect on the post-activity scores (p=.37), and the participation in the two types of discussions did not differ significantly, either (r=-.20, p=.09). In an anonymous, optional post-activity survey, a majority of the students self reported that they found the rounds-based structure (55%) and anonymity (80%) to be helpful in their participation and learning.
Conference Paper
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Piaget's classic work on how children learn showed that when learners engage in critical discussions with peers who have ideas that conflict with their own, that contributes effectively to their developing deep understanding of the concepts involved. Building on this foundation, we have developed a novel and powerful approach to collaborative learning that exploits the power of on-line technologies to enable engineering-more generally, STEM-students to develop thorough understanding of technical topics through collaborative learning. Our approach, as we show, has a number of important advantages over most approaches to face-to-face collaborative learning. We have implemented a prototype web app, CONSIDER, based on our approach and used it in two Computer Science and Engineering courses: a graduate level theory of programming languages course, and an undergrad principles of programming languages course. It was very well received, with 15 out of 22 students in the grad course, and 13 out of 21 students in the undergrad course indicating, in a post-discussion survey, that the approach provided them a better opportunity to learn compared in-class discussions. We present a summary of the survey results, along with the theoretical underpinnings of the approach and some details of the prototype implementation. We also present our design for the next set of experiments with the CONSIDER tool.
Conference Paper
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Many researchers have stressed the importance of *argumentation* in STEM education to enable students to develop deep understanding. This work has mostly been at the K-12 level, but argumentation is even more important for undergraduates in computing and engineering. Not only will argumentation help students master the concepts, it will also better prepare them for their professional careers where they can expect to engage in vigorous arguments about trade-offs in various possible approaches to addressing problems in their projects. Prior research has shown that some key requirements must be met to ensure that argumentation is most productive: The argumentation must be in small groups of 4--5 students each; each group must include students with different approaches to the topic; and the instructor should *not* participate in the discussion. The last requirement may seem surprising but it is critical since, otherwise, the students are likely to simply accept what the instructor says and the goal of helping them achieve deep understanding will be compromised. But there are challenging issues that must be addressed if argumentation is to be widely used in computing/engineering courses. First, how would faculty find time in their already packed courses to accommodate small-group argumentation to any serious extent? Second, wouldn't the most vocal students dominate such discussions while others stay in the background? Third, wouldn't preconceived biases some may harbor concerning the abilities of others seriously affect the discussions? Etc. We have developed a highly innovative approach and online system, CONSIDER, to address these and other problems. A CONSIDER discussion starts with the instructor posting, on the system, a suitable problem. Each student then submits her individual answer by a specified deadline. Next, the instructor uses the system to form groups based on these submissions and the discussion begins. The discussion may be customized in various ways: the discussion may be specified to be anonymous with students in each group being labeled S1, S2, S3, S4 or they may know each other's identities; the discussion may be organized in a series of *rounds* with each student making one submission in each round and the other students not seeing the submission until the start of the next round or it may be organized in a more forum-like manner with each submission becoming available to the group as soon as it is made; etc. In each case, the student is required to explicitly specify whether she agrees or disagrees with the positions of the others in the group. We have used CONSIDER in some junior-level courses in computing and the results were quite positive as were student reactions. In this paper, we present the results from a current junior-level course on programming language principles, summarize the lessons learned, and ideas for improvements. We also summarize online argumentation systems developed by some other researchers. One important difference is that whereas these other researchers focus on developing students' argumentation abilities, we focus on using argumentation to help students master computing/engineering concepts and approaches.
Chapter
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In 2008, the National Science Foundation (NSF) released the report “Fostering Learning in the Networked World: The Cyberlearning Opportunity and Challenge”. NSF argued in this report that the heavy investment and focus on Cyberinfrastructures must be complemented by a parallel investment in Cyberlearning, “…learning that is mediated by networked computing and communications technologies.” (Borgman et al. 2008). The rationale was that information and communication technologies had reached a critical tipping point where high-end computing, cyberinfrastructures and mobile technologies were readily available for billions of users, but it was still unclear what affordances they could bring to learning in structured classroom settings and more informal learning environments.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Piaget's classic work on cognitive development showed that engaging learners in critical discussions with peers about ideas that are different than theirs leads to deep conceptual understanding. Implementing such an approach in computer science and, more generally, STEM, courses has some specific challenges. Based on Piaget's theory, we have developed a highly innovative collaborative learning approach that exploits specific affordances of web technologies to address these challenges. It allows small groups of students with different ideas about the topic in question, to engage in a highly-structured discussion that enables each student in the group to develop deep understanding. While a number of researchers have explored approaches to collaborative learning, a key difference with our work is that our focus is helping individual students develop deep understanding, whereas the focus of much of this other work is on developing students' team skills, effective communication abilities, and the like. We have tested our approach in an undergraduate CS course and the effect on student performance was encouraging; moreover, about two-thirds of the students in the course, based on a post-activity survey, felt that the approach was effective in helping them develop conceptual understanding. https://swaroop.netlify.app/publication/joshi-2016-enabl/
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Collaborative learning is a key component of software engineering (SE) courses in most undergraduate computing curricula. Thus these courses include fairly intensive team projects, the intent being to ensure that not only do students develop an understanding of key software engineering concepts and practices, but also develop the skills needed to work effectively in large design and development teams. But there is a definite risk in collaborative learning in that there is a potential that individual learning gets lost in the focus on the team’s success in completing the project (s). While the team’s success is indeed the primary goal of an industrial SE team, ensuring individual learning is obviously an essential goal of SE courses. We have developed a novel approach that exploits the affordances of mobile and web technologies to help ensure that individual students in teams in SE courses develop a thorough understanding of the relevant concepts and practices while working on team projects, indeed, that the team contributes in an essential manner to the learning of each member of the team. We describe the learning theory underlying our approach, provide some details concerning the prototype implementation of a tool based on the approach, and describe how we are using it in an SE course in our program. Full-text: https://swaroop.netlify.app/publication/soundarajan-2015-collab-cooper/
Book
Arguing to Learn: Confronting Cognitions in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments focuses on how new pedagogical scenarios, task environments and communication tools within Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) environments can favour collaborative and productive confrontations of ideas, evidence, arguments and explanations, or arguing to learn. This book is the first that has assembled the work of internationally renowned scholars on argumentation-related CSCL research. All chapters present in-depth analyses of the processes by which the interactive confrontation of cognitions can lead to collaborative learning, on the basis of a wide variety of theoretical models, empirical data and Internet-based tools.