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Objectives. The purpose of this study was to validate the Czech version of the 15-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-15-CZ) and to examine its psychometric properties. Sample and setting. Two separate Czech samples were used. In Survey 1, the FFMQ was translated into Czech and then administered through an on-line survey. 2806 participants (sample 1) completed the FFMQ-CZ and the SWLS. In Survey 2, 279 participants (sample 2) completed the FFMQ-15-CZ, the SCS-CZ, the TOSCA-3, the GAD-7 and the PHQ-9. Statistical analysis. Using IBM SPSS Statistics- 23 and Amos-23, calculations of descriptive statistics, Cronbach’s alpha, Pearson correlation coefficients, test-retest analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were performed. Results. The confirmatory factor analysis (sample 1 and 2) confirmed the five-factor structure of FFMQ-15-CZ. A single higher-order factor model was then also confirmed. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for total FFMQ-15-CZ and subscales in survey 1/2 were as follows: FFMQ-15-CZ (α = 0,77/0,78), nonreactivity to inner experience (α = 0,69/0,65), observing (α = 0,64/0,52), acting with awareness (α = 0,71/0,69), describing (α = 0,83/0,79), nonjudging of inner experience (α = 0,79/0,78). As expected, in Survey 1 and 2, the FFMQ-15-CZ exhibited a significant positive correlation to measures of life satisfaction and self-compassion and a significant negative correlation to measures of shame-proneness, difficulties in emotion regulation, symptoms of anxiety and symptoms of depression. Study limitation. The samples used in this study were not representative of the general Czech population. In the future, it would be useful to further examine the psychometric properties of the FFMQ-15-CZ in a representative sample of the Czech population, in a sample of experienced meditators as well as in various clinical samples.
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... V českém a slovenském prostředí je k měření náchylnosti k vině a hanbě využíván test TOSCA-3 prakticky výhradně (např. Dvořáková, 2013;Kořínek et al., 2019;Látalová, 2017;Marcinechová & Martinčeková, 2018;Škrdlík, 2019), přestože řada autorů tuto metodu kritizuje pro její konstruktovou podreprezentovanost a neschopnost dostatečně diferencovat mezi oběma konstrukty (Fontaine et al., 2001;Giner-Sorolla et al., 2011;Luyten et al., 2002). Cohenová, Wolf, Panter a Insko (2011) upozorňují na to, že se v TOSCA-3 prolínají emoční a behaviorální složky v položkách jednotlivých konstruktů. ...
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