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Abstract

Climate change can be violent, expressed through immediate weather events, such as floods and storms, and slower, long term violence, such as droughts that impact women’s everyday lives and livelihoods and are exacerbated by other pressures and conflicts. However, climate change has not been explicitly connected to the UN women, peace, and security agenda. The likely reason is that the gender implications of the climate issue have only recently gained salience on the international climate agenda, through the dominant framing of women’s vulnerability. This chapter evokes the ecofeminism argument that climate change is part of a destructive patriarchal politico-economic structure, which implies there can be no separate solution to concerns for peace, equality, or climate issues; all have to be included in a reassessment of humans’ relation to the earth. It suggests that the human security focus provides a more inclusive way to connect the aspirations for peace with climate concerns. To that end, I argue that employing the human security lens as a starting point can help in taking seriously how individual women experience the bottom-up the effects of climate events.

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... can be understood as a political agenda with a life beyond the UNSCRs: advocates have sought to link its principles to issues not covered by the resolutions, such as LGBT+ rights, migration, and climate change (Hagen 2016;Holvikivi and Reeves 2017;Kronsell 2019). The NGOs, activists, and UN staff who advocated for the adoption of UNSCR 1325 in 2000 held varying conceptualizations of WPS and its purpose. ...
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Preprint
The policy paper addresses the nexus between gender, climate and security. Firstly, it refers to climate change as a threat multiplier, which exacerbates threats to peace and security. Secondly, it examines the gender dimension of climate change, arguing that climate-related security risks have a disproportionate impact on women and girls. Thirdly, the policy paper further explores how gender-responsive adaptation policies can contribute to sustainable peace and security in Africa. It argues that gender-responsive policy action that links climate adaptation, peace-building and sustainable development should be based on: stronger UN system-wide coherence, systematic gender mainstreaming, a human security approach, a human rights-based approach, stronger links with the UN Security Council Agenda on Women, Peace and Security, as well as coordinated, inclusive and research-based action that meets the special needs of Africa.
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To commemorate the twentieth anniversary of Resolution 1325, this introduction discusses the state of the field in the women peace and security (WPS) agenda and outlines the challenges to implementation. It begins by introducing the current gaps we see in WPS practice, many of which are driven by insufficient data and lack of funding. The section that follows provides a brief discussion of the global diffusion of the WPS agenda. We highlight the important contribution the Global South has made in implementing the agenda in the absence of great power leadership and the stultified progress of the Global North. We argue that the WPS agenda remains hampered by poor national implementation, a lack of support for civil society initiatives and a failure to recognize the importance of its application in context. The final section introduces the articles in this issue, showing how they advance an emerging human security agenda: integrating WPS into UN-led security initiatives like R2P, and the challenges of the implementation of the WPS agenda in varied local and national contexts. We conclude by arguing that to meet future challenges, the WPS agenda must be broadened to include areas outside traditional conceptions of security and embrace the full remit of evolving security threats; in particular, structural barriers that prevent the empowerment of women across the board.
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