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Infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis of the uranyl minerals

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... The weak bands between ∼1450 and 1300 cm -1 can be attributed to the ν 3 (CO 3 ) 2antisymmetric stretching vibrations of the (CO 3 ) 2units. Medium to strong multiple bands between 1100 and 1050 cm -1 are connected with the ν 1 (CO 3 ) 2symmetric stretching vibrations of several structurally non-equivalent carbonate units (Koglin et al., 1979;Anderson et al., 1980;Čejka, 1999 and. The very strong bands centred at 826, 827, 829 and 830 cm -1 for markeyite, pseudomarkeyite, natromarkeyite and paramarkeyite, respectively, are due to the ν 1 (UO 2 ) 2+ symmetric stretching vibrations and provide inferred U-O bond lengths of ∼1.78-1.79 ...
... The medium-strength band in the spectra centred near 240 cm -1 is assigned to the split doubly degenerate ν 2 (δ) (UO 2 ) 2+ bending vibrations. Bands between 200 and 120 cm -1 are due to lattice modes (Koglin et al., 1979;Anderson et al., 1980;Čejka, 1999 and. ...
Article
The new mineral paramarkeyite (IMA2020–024), Ca2(UO2)(CO3)3·5H2O, was found in the Markey mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where it occurs as a secondary phase on gypsum-coated asphaltum in association with andersonite, calcite, gypsum and natromarkeyite. Paramarkeyite crystals are transparent, pale green-yellow, striated tablets, up to 0.11 mm across. The mineral has white streak and vitreous lustre. It exhibits moderate bluish white fluorescence (405 nm laser). It is very brittle with irregular, curved fracture and a Mohs hardness of 2½. It has an excellent {100} cleavage and probably two good cleavages on {010} and {001}. The measured density is 2.91(2) g cm–3. Optically, the mineral is biaxial (–) with α = 1.550(2), β = 1.556(2), γ = 1.558(2) (white light); 2V = 60(2)°; strong r > v dispersion; orientation: Y = b; nonpleochroic. The Raman spectrum exhibits bands consistent with UO22+, CO32– and O–H. Electron microprobe analysis provided the empirical formula (Ca1.83Na0.20Sr0.03)∑2.05(UO2)(CO3)3·5H2O (+0.07 H). Paramarkeyite is monoclinic, P21/n, a = 17.9507(7), b = 18.1030(8), c = 18.3688(13) Å, β = 108.029(8)°, V = 5676.1(6) Å3 and Z = 16. The structure of paramarkeyite (R1 = 0.0647 for 6657 I > 2I) contains uranyl tricarbonate clusters that are linked by Ca–O polyhedra to form heteropolyhedral layers. The structure of paramarkeyite is very similar to those of markeyite, natromarkeyite and pseudomarkeyite.
... The weak bands between 1439 and 1358 cm -1 can be attributed to the ν 3 (CO 3 ) 2antisymmetric stretching vibrations of the (CO 3 ) 2units. Medium to strong multiple bands between 1094 and 1067 cm -1 are connected with the ν 1 (CO 3 ) 2symmetric stretching vibrations of several structurally non-equivalent carbonate units (Koglin et al., 1979;Anderson et al., 1980;Čejka, 1999. ...
... The medium broad band in the spectra centred near 240 cm -1 is assigned to the split doubly degenerate ν 2 (δ) (UO 2 ) 2+ bending vibrations. Bands between 189 and 127 cm -1 are due to lattice modes (Koglin et al., 1979;Anderson et al., 1980;Čejka, 1999. ...
Article
The new minerals natromarkeyite, Na 2 Ca 8 (UO 2) 4 (CO 3) 13 (H 2 O) 24 ⋅3H 2 O (IMA2018-152) and pseudomarkeyite, Ca 8 (UO 2) 4 (CO 3) 12 (H 2 O) 18 ⋅3H 2 O (IMA2018-114) were found in the Markey mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where they occur as secondary phases on asphaltum. Natromarkeyite properties are: untwinned blades and tablets to 0.2 mm, pale yellow green colour; transparent; white streak; bright bluish white fluorescence (405 nm laser); vitreous to pearly lustre; brittle; Mohs hardness 1½ to 2; irregular fracture; three cleavages ({001} perfect, {100} and {010} good); density = 2.70(2) g cm-3 ; biaxial (-) with α = 1.528(2), β = 1.532(2) and γ = 1.533(2); and pleochroism is X = pale green yellow, Y ≈ Z = light green yellow. Pseudomarkeyite properties are: twinned tapering blades and tablets to 1 mm; pale green yellow colour; transparent; white streak; bright bluish white fluorescence (405 nm laser); vitreous to pearly lustre; brittle; Mohs hardness ≈ 1; stepped fracture; three cleavages ({10 1} very easy, {010} good, {100} fair); density = 2.88(2) g cm-3 ; biaxial (-) with α = 1.549(2), β = 1.553(2) and γ = 1.557(2); and it is nonpleochroic. The Raman spectra of markeyite, natromar-keyite and pseudomarkeyite are very similar and exhibit bands consistent with UO 2 2+ , CO 3 2-and O-H. Electron microprobe analyses provided the empirical formula Na 2.01 Ca 7.97 Mg 0.03 Cu 2+ 0.05 (UO 2) 4 (CO 3) 13 (H 2 O) 24 ⋅3H 2 O (-0.11 H) for natromarkeyite and Ca 7.95 (UO 2) 4 (CO 3) 12 (H 2 O) 18 ⋅3H 2 O (+0.10 H) for pseudomarkeyite. Natromarkeyite is orthorhombic, Pmmn, a = 17.8820(13), b = 18.3030(4), c = 10.2249(3) Å, V = 3336.6(3) Å 3 and Z = 2. Pseudomarkeyite is monoclinic, P2 1 /m, a = 17.531(3), b = 18.555(3), c = 9.130(3) Å, β = 103.95(3)°, V = 2882.3(13) Å 3 and Z = 2. The structures of natromarkeyite (R 1 = 0.0202 for 2898 I > 2σI) and pseudomarkeyite (R 1 = 0.0787 for 2106 I > 2σI) contain uranyl tricarbonate clusters that are linked by (Ca/Na)-O polyhedra forming thick corrugated heteropolyhedral layers. Natromarkeyite is isostructural with markeyite; pseudomarkeyite has a very similar structure.
... An ATR objective (ZnSe/diamond composite) was pressed into fragments of paddlewheelite crystals and the spectrum was measured from 4000 to 650 cm −1 (Figure 3). The band assignments given here are based on those outlined byČejka [16]. A broad, multicomponent band spanning from~3500 to~2800 cm −1 is related to ν O-H stretching vibrations of water molecules (Figure 4a). ...
... An ATR objective (ZnSe/diamond composite) was pressed into fragments of paddlewheelite crystals and the spectrum was measured from 4000 to 650 cm −1 (Figure 3). The band assignments given here are based on those outlined by Čejka [16]. A broad, multicomponent band spanning from ~3500 to ~2800 cm −1 is related to ν O-H stretching vibrations of water molecules ( Figure 4a). ...
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Paddlewheelite, MgCa5Cu2[(UO2)(CO3)3]4�33H2O, is a new uranyl carbonate mineral found underground in the Svornost mine, Jáchymov District, Bohemia, Czech Republic, where it occurs as a secondary oxidation product of uraninite. The conditions leading to its crystallization are complex, likely requiring concomitant dissolution of uraninite, calcite, dolomite, chalcopyrite, and andersonite. Paddlewheelite is named after its distinctive structure, which consists of paddle-wheel clusters of uranyl tricarbonate units bound by square pyramidal copper “axles” and a cubic calcium cation “gearbox.” Paddle wheels share edges with calcium polyhedra to form open sheets that are held together solely by hydrogen bonding interactions. The new mineral is monoclinic, Pc, a = 22.052(4), b = 17.118(3), c = 19.354(3) Å, �beta = 90.474(2)�, V = 7306(2) Å3 and Z = 4. Paddlewheelite is the second-most structurally complex uranyl carbonate mineral known after ewingite and its structure may provide insights into the insufficiently described mineral voglite, as well as Cu–U–CO3 equilibrium in general.
... These sites could be interpreted as being because of carboxyl and amino groups. The appearance of a new peak at 918.6 cm −1 and changes in peak positions and intensity around the 550-1000 cm −1 region could be assigned to asymmetric stretching vibration of v 3 UO 2 2+ and stretching vibration of weekly bonded oxygen ligands with uranium (v U-O ligand ) [36,37]. M2 showed the FTIR spectrum of biomass of carboxyl esterification after exposure to uranium. ...
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The goal of this study is to understand the role of various functional groups on the cell surface when the microorganisms are exposed to uranium (U(VI)). The biomass of Deinococcus radiodurans was subjected to chemical treatments to modify the carboxyl (-C=O), amino (-NH2), phosphate (-PO2−), and hydroxyl (-OH) groups, as well as the lipid fraction. The behavior and process of U(VI) biosorption by Deinococcus radiodurans were ascertained, followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. Carboxyl esterification and amino methylation deteriorated the removal efficiency by 8.0% and 15.5%, respectively, while lipid extraction, phosphate esterification, and hydroxyl methylation improved the removal efficiency by 11.7%, 8.7%, and 4.1%, respectively. The kinetic results revealed that uranium biosorption behavior by the raw and chemically modified biomass fitted well with the model of pseudo-second-order kinetic (R2 = 0.9949~0.9998). FTIR and SEM-EDS indicated that uranium initially bound with the raw and chemically modified Deinococcus radiodurans, which was probably controlled by ion exchange at the first stage, followed by complexation with the -C=O and -NH2 groups, which especially prefer to bond with P and O atoms on the -PO2− group.
... The shift of peak 1637 cm −1 indicates changes in the stretching frequency of OH upon binding of uranium. Stretching vibrations at 950 cm −1 is characteristic for U-O group [32]. ...
Article
The present work provides a thorough description of the preparation of two cellulose anion exchange resins. In addition, the application of the prepared resins for treatment the uranium-contaminated wastewater. In the preparation, the first resin was cellulose reacted with 0.3 M HNO 3 to produce Activated Cellulose (AC), while the second was AC treated with sodium metasilicate and phosphoric acid to yield Silica Grafted Cellulose (SGC). The efficiency of the two prepared resins for uranium adsorption from aqueous solution was testifying on a batch scale. In solutions of pH ranging from 4 to 7, results showed a high exchange rate and uptaking capacity up to 105 mg/g. However, the addition of NO 3⁻ , Fe ³⁺ and Th ⁴⁺ ions to the target media has an adverse impact on the uranium sorption for AC adsorbent. Otherwise, the addition of uranyl sulfate complexes could ameliorate Fe ³⁺ and Th ⁴⁺ adsorbed into the SGC.
... Several past studies of uranyl sulfates informed our assignments of bands to specific Raman modes (cf. Plášil et al., 2010;Čejka, 1999). In the lussierite spectrum, the split, triply degenerate  3 (SO 4 ) 2antisymmetric stretching vibrations occur as weaker bands at 1210 (with a shoulder at 1195), 1180, 1150 and 1130 cm -1 . ...
Article
The new mineral lussierite (IMA2018-101), Na10[(UO2)(SO4)4](SO4)2(H2O)3, was found in the Blue Lizard mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where it occurs as pale green- yellow prisms or blades in a secondary assemblage with belakovskiite, ferrinatrite, halite, ivsite, metavoltine and thenardite. The streak is white and the fluorescence is bright cyan under 365 nm ultraviolet light. Crystals are transparent with vitreous luster. The tenacity is brittle, the Mohs hardness is 2½, the fracture is irregular and no cleavage was observed. The mineral is easily soluble in H2O and has a measured density of 2.87(2) g·cm–3. Lussierite is optically biaxial (+), with α = 1.493(1), β = 1.505(1) and γ = 1.518(1) (white light); 2V (meas.) = 88(1)°; dispersion is r > v, moderate; pleochroism: X = colourless, Y and Z green yellow (X < Y ≈ Z); optical orientation: X = b, Z ^ a = 44° in obtuse β). Electron microprobe analyses (WDS mode) provided Na10(U0.99O2)(S1.00O4)6·3H2O (+0.06 H for charge balance). The five strongest X-ray powder diffraction lines are [dobs Å(I)(hkl)]: 6.69(95)(-111,130), 4.814(100)(150,002,060), 3.461(83)(171,-202), 2.955(81)(113,330) and 2.882(74)(-191,311,191,0·10·0). Lussierite is monoclinic, Cc, a = 9.3134(4), b = 28.7501(11), c = 9.6346(7) Å, β = 93.442(7)°, V = 2575.1(2) Å3 and Z = 4. The structure (R1 = 0.0298 for 5202 I > 2I) contains a [(UO2)(SO4)4]6– uranyl sulfate cluster in which one SO4 tetrahedron shares an edge (bidentate linkage) with the UO7 pentagonal bipyramid. The uranyl sulfate clusters occur in layers and are linked through a complex network of bonds involving Na+ cations, isolated SO4 tetrahedra and isolated H2O groups.
Article
Gurzhiite, ideally Al(UO2)(SO4)2F·10H2O, is a new uranyl sulfate mineral from the Bykogorskoe U deposit, Northern Caucasus, Russia. It occurs as fine-grained aggregates forming veinlets up to 50 cm long in cracks of the brecciated rock. Gurzhiite aggregates are composed of small bladed crystals up to 0.1 mm across. Associated minerals include khademite and quartz. Gurzhiite is pale yellow in crystals, lemon yellow in aggregates, transparent with vitreous lustre and white streak. It is brittle and has an irregular fracture. Cleavage is good on {001}. The new mineral exhibits a bright yellow-green fluorescence under both longwave and shortwave UV radiation. Mohs hardness is ~2. Dmeas = 2.52(3) g/cm 3 , Dcalc = 2.605 g/cm 3. The mineral is biaxial https://doi.org/10.1180/mgm.2022.34 Published online by Cambridge University Press (-) with α = 1.528(3), β = 1.538(2), γ = 1.544(3) (589 nm); 2Vmeas= 80(10), 2Vcalc = 75.1. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 21(O + F) apfu is Al0.92Zn0.05Fe 3+ 0.03Na0.03U0.95S2.00O9.85F0.99 · 10.16H2O. Gurzhiite is triclinic, space group P-1, a = 7.193(2), b = 11.760(2), c = 11.792(2) Å, α = 67.20(3), β = 107.76(3), γ = 89.99(3)°, V = 867.7(4) Å 3 and Z = 2. The five strongest lines of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern [d, Å (I, %)(hkl)] are: 10.24(100)(001); 5.40(14)(-1-11); 5.11(54)(002); 3.405(11)(-211); 3.065(11)(-1-13). The crystal structure of gurzhiite is based upon uranyl-sulfate chains of the same type as have been found e.g., in. bobcookite or svornostite. Between the chains are two types of Al-octahedra-Al1(H2O)6 and Al2F2(H2O)4. The entire structure is held by a complex network of H-bonds. The new mineral honors Russian mineralogist and crystallographer Dr. Vladislav V. Gurzhiy in recognition for his contributions to uranium mineralogy and crystallography.
Article
Nitscheite (IMA2020-078), (NH4)2[(UO2)2(SO4)3(H2O)2]·3H2O, is a new mineral species from the Green Lizard mine, Red Canyon, San Juan County, Utah, U.S.A. It is a secondary phase found in association with chinleite-(Y), gypsum, pyrite, and Co-rich rietveldite. Nitscheite occurs in subparallel and divergent intergrowths of yellow prisms, up to about 0.3 mm in length. Crystals are elongated on [101] and exhibit the forms {100}, {010}, {001}, and {11-1}. The mineral is transparent with vitreous luster and very pale-yellow streak. It exhibits bright green fluorescence under a 405 nm laser. The Mohs hardness is ~2. The mineral has brittle tenacity, curved fracture, and one good cleavage on {010}. The measured density is 3.30(2) g·cm-3. The mineral is easily soluble in RT H2O. The mineral is optically biaxial (-), α = 1.560(2), β = 26 1.582(2), γ = 1.583(2) (white light); 2Vmeas = 17(1)°; no dispersion; orientation X = b, Z ≈ [101]; pleochroism X colourless, Y and Z yellow; X < Y ≈ Z. Electron microprobe analysis provided the empirical formula (NH4)1.99U2.00S3.00O21H10.01. Nitscheite is monoclinic, P21/n, a = 17.3982(4), b = 12.8552(3), c = 17.4054(12) Å, β = 96.649(7)°, V = 3866.7(3) Å 3 , and Z = 8. The structure (R1 = 0.0329 for 4547 I > 3sigma(I) reflections) contains [(UO2)2(SO4)3(H2O)2]2- uranyl-sulfate sheets, which are unique among minerals, with NH4 and H2O groups between the sheets.
Article
The new mineral uranoclite (IMA2020-074), (UO2)2(OH)2Cl2(H2O)4, was found in the Blue Lizard mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA, where it occurs as tightly intergrown aggregates of irregular yellow crystals in a secondary assemblage with gypsum. The streak is very pale yellow and the fluorescence is bright green-white under 405 nm ultraviolet light. Crystals are translucent with vitreous lustre. The tenacity is brittle, the Mohs hardness is about 1½, the fracture is irregular. The mineral is soluble in H2O and has a calculated density of 4.038 g·cm–3. Electron microprobe analyses provided (UO2)2(OH)2.19Cl1.81(H2O)4. The six strongest X-ray powder diffraction lines are [dobs Å(I)(hkl)]: 8.85(38)(002), 5.340(100)(200,110), 5.051(63)(-202), 4.421(83)(112,004,202), 3.781(38)(-212) and 3.586(57)(014,-204). Uranoclite is monoclinic, P21/n, a = 10.763(8), b = 6.156(8), c = 17.798(8) Å, β = 95.656(15)°, V = 1173.5(18) Å3 and Z = 4. The structure is the same as that of synthetic (UO2)2(OH)2Cl2(H2O) in which the structural unit is a dimer consisting of two pentagonal bipyramids that share an equatorial OH–OH edge. The dimers are linked to one another only by hydrogen bonding. This is the second known uranyl mineral containing essential Cl and the first in which Cl coordinates to U6+.
Article
Uroxite (IMA2018-100), [(UO2)2(C2O4)(OH)2(H2O)2]·H2O, and metauroxite (2019-030), (UO2)2(C2O4)(OH)2(H2O)2, are the first two uranyl-oxalate minerals. Uroxite was found in the Markey mine, Red Canyon, Utah, USA and in the Burro mine, Slick Rock district, Colorado, USA. Metauroxite was found only in the Burro mine. Both minerals are post-mining, secondary phases found in efflorescent crusts on mine walls. Uroxite occurs as light yellow, striated blades exhibiting moderate neon-green fluorescence, ca 2 Mohs hardness, good {101} and {010} cleavages, density(calc) = 4.187 g/cm3; optics: biaxial (–), α = 1.602(2), β = 1.660(2), γ = 1.680(2) (white light), 2Vmeas. = 59(1)°, moderate r > v dispersion, orientation Y = b, Z ^ a = 35° in obtuse β, nonpleochroic. Metauroxite occurs as light yellow crude blades and tablets exhibiting weak green-gray fluorescence, ca 2 Mohs hardness, good {001}cleavage, densitycalc = 4.403 g/cm3; approximate optics: α′ = 1.615(5), γ′ = 1.685(5). Electron probe microanalysis provided UO3 79.60, C2O3 10.02, H2O 10.03, total 99.65 wt.% for uroxite and UO3 82.66, C2O3 10.40, H2O 7.81, total 100.87 wt.% for metauroxite; C2O3 and H2O based on the structures. Uroxite is monoclinic, P21/c, a = 5.5698(2), b = 15.2877(6), c = 13.3724(9) Å, β = 94.015(7)°, V = 1135.86(10) Å3 and Z = 4. Metauroxite is triclinic, P–1, a = 5.5635(3), b = 6.1152(4), c = 7.8283(4) Å, α = 85.572(5), β = 89.340(4), γ = 82.468°, V = 263.25(3) Å3 and Z = 1. In the structure of uroxite (R1 = 0.0333 for 2081 I > 2I reflections), UO7 pentagonal bipyramids share corners forming [U4O24] tetramers, which are linked by C2O4 groups to form corrugated sheets. In the structure of metauroxite (R1 = 0.0648 for 1602 I > 2I reflections) UO7 pentagonal bipyramids share edges forming [U2O12] dimers, which are linked by C2O4 groups to form zig-zag chains.
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Naturally occurring uranyl silicates are common constituents of the oxidized parts (i.e., supergene zone) of various types of uranium deposits. Their abundance reflects the widespread distribution of Si4+ in the Earth’s crust and, therefore, in groundwaters. Up to date, 16 uranyl silicate minerals are known. Noteworthy is that the natural uranyl silicates are not extremely diverse regarding their crystal structures; it is a result of possible concentrations (activity) of Si4+ in aqueous solutions derived from dissolution of primary Si minerals or the composition of late hydrothermal fluids. Therefore, in natural systems, we distinguish in fact among two groups of uranyl silicate minerals: uranophane and weeksite-group. They differ in U:Si ratio (uranophane, 1:1; weeksite, 2:5) and they form under different conditions, reflected in distinctive mineral associations. An overview of crystal-chemistry is provided in this paper, along with the new structure data for few members of the uranophane group. Calculations of the structural complexity parameters for natural uranyl silicates are commented about as well as other groups of uranyl minerals; these calculations are also presented from the point of view of the mineral paragenesis and associations.
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The reaction of sodium N-morpholine acetate with selenic and sulfuric acid and uranyl nitrate results in the formation of two novel open-framework compounds, |Na(Hmfa)|[(UO 2 ) 2 (SeO 4 ) 3 (H 2 O)](H 2 O) 2 ( NaUSe ) and [Na 2 (SO 3 OH)(Hmfa)]|(UO 2 )(SO 4 ) 2 | ( NaUS ), respectively. Despite identical synthetic procedures, sulfate structure dramatically differs from selenate compound. Their common feature is an open-framework featuring two-dimensional system of channels occupied by protonated morpholino-N-acetic acid species. Coordination of Na atoms is different. In NaUSe , [(UO 2 ) 2 (SeO 4 ) 3 (H 2 O)] ²⁻ layers are pillared by {Na 2 O 8 (H 2 O) 2 (Hmfa) 2 } complexes to form a microporous framework. In NaUS , UO 7 and SO 4 polyhedra of [(UO 2 )(SO 4 ) 2 ] ²⁻ chains share common oxygen atoms with Na-centered tetrameric complexes providing a three-dimensional integrity of the structure. Both of the compounds are characterized by IR spectroscopy.
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Redcanyonite (IMA2016-082), (NH4)2Mn[(UO2)4O4(SO4)2](H2O)4, occurs underground in the Blue Lizard mine, Red Canyon, White Canyon district, San Juan County, Utah, USA. It occurs with natrozippeite, brochantite, devilline, posnjakite, johannite, gypsum, bobcookite, pickeringite, pentahydrite and the NH4-analogue of zippeite: ammoniozippeite. Redcanyonite occurs as radial aggregates of red–orange needles and blades individually reaching up to 0.2 mm long, with aggregates measuring up to 1 mm in diameter. Crystals are flattened on {010} and elongated along [100], exhibit perfect cleavage on {010}, and exhibit the forms {010}, {001}, {101} and {10�1}. Twinning is ubiquitous, by 180° rotation on [100]. Redcanyonite is translucent with a pale orange streak, is non-fluorescent, has a Mohs hardness of 2, and has brittle tenacity with uneven fracture. Optically, redcanyonite is biaxial (+), α = 1.725(3), β = 1.755(3), γ = 1.850(5) (white light); 2V (meas.) = 60(2)°, 2V (calc.) = 61.3°; and dispersion is r < v, very strong. Pleochroism is: X = orange, Y = yellow and Z = orange; Y << X < Z. The optical orientation is X = b, Y ≈ c*, Z ≈ a. The empirical formula is (NH4)2.02(Mn0.49Cu0.09Zn0.06)Σ0.64H+0.72[(UO2)4O4(S0.99P0.01O4)2](H2O)4, based on 4 U and 24 O apfu. Redcanyonite is monoclinic, C2/m, a = 8.6572(17), b = 14.155(3), c = 8.8430(19) Å, β = 104.117(18)°, V = 1050.9(4) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure was refined to R1 = 0.0382 for 1079 reflections with Iobs > 3σI. Uranyl oxo-sulfate sheets in redcanyonite adopt the well-known zippeite topology, which consists of zigzag chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked by sulfate tetrahedra to form sheets. The sheets are linked to each other through bonds to interlayer NH4+ groups and octahedrally coordinated Mn2+, and by hydrogen bonds from H2O groups. Redcanyonite is named for Red Canyon in southeast Utah, USA.
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The synthesis, structure, and infrared spectroscopy properties of the new organically templated uranyl sulfate Na(phgH⁺)₇[(UO₂)₆(SO₄)10](H₂O)3.5(1), obtained at room temperature by evaporation from aqueous solution, are reported. Its structure contains unique uranyl sulfate [(UO₂)₆(SO₄)10]8-nanotubules templated by protonatedN-phenylglycine (C₆H₅NH₂CH₂COOH)⁺. Their internal diameter is 1.4 nm. Each of the nanotubules is built from uranyl sulfate rings sharing common SO₄ tetrahedra. The template plays an important role in the formation of the complex structure of1. The aromatic rings are stacked parallel to each other due to the effect of π-π interaction with their side chains extending into the gaps between the nanotubules.
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