Book

The Struggle for Citizenship Education in Egypt: (Re) Imagining Subjects and Citizens

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Abstract

This book offers nuanced analyses of the narratives, spaces, and forms of citizenship education prior to and during the aftermath of the January 2011 Egyptian Revolution. To explore the dynamics shaping citizenship education during this significant socio-political transition, this edited volume brings together established and emerging researchers from multiple disciplines, perspectives, and geographic locations. By highlighting the impacts of recent transitions on perceptions of citizenship and citizenship education in Egypt, this volume demonstrates that the critical developments in Egypt's schools, universities, and other non-formal and informal spaces of education, have not been isolated from local, national, and global debates around meanings of citizenship.
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Focusing on youth movement in Egypt during the time of unrest and revolts, this chapter is based on my research that explores the potential insights and lessons that can be deduced from the case of Selmiyah (peaceful), a grass-roots movement that is aiming to spread the culture of peace through different dimensions and channels.
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Citizenship education is the means to develop individuals, who can act as effective citizens in their societies. Many scholars and politicians have written about the importance of viewing citizenship as a priority for achieving social/national cohesion.
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