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Projecting the chiaroscuro of the electricity use of communication and computing from 2018 to 2030

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It is not unlikely that we might enter the YottaByte (10 24 Byte) era in the next decade. If so, how can the effect on power consumption be understood? The main problems with several existing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) power footprint investigations are: too limited (geographical and temporal) system boundary, overestimation of power saving potential in the next decade, assume that historical power use can predict future global power use in the next decade despite unprecedented data traffic growth, assume that Moore´s law relation to digital circuitry can continue "forever" and that no problems with extra cooling power will occur for several decades. The highly variable outlooks for the future power consumptions depend on "starting values", disruptions, regional differences and perceptual estimations of electricity intensity reductions and data traffic increase. A hugely optimistic scenario-which takes into account 20% annual improvement of the J/bit in data centres and networks until 2030 is presented. However, the electric power consumption of the present ICT scope will be very significant unless great efforts are put into power saving features enabling such improvements of J/bit. Despite evident risks, it seems though that planned power saving measures and innovation will be able to keep the electricity consumption of ICT and the World under some kind of control. Nevertheless, the power use of certain types of blockchain applications could be another driver which cannot be ignored in the context of ICT global power use. Artificial Intelligence could help reduce the power consumption in ICT, but depending on the goal of the optimization, it may also foster more power use overall. Video streaming is a strong driver of data generation and electricity consumption. The major conclusion is-based on several simulations in the present study-that future consumer 2 ICT infrastructure cannot slow its overall electricity use until 2030 and it will use several times more TWh than today.
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... The digitalization of most businesses will also require additional amounts [5]. Some [9] argue that a "tsunami" of data is about to be unleashed according to Fig. 1. [5,9]. An earlier prediction model for the entire information technology (IT) sector [5] includes the fact that energy efficient smartphones and tablets might be used instead of desktops and laptops for streaming videos. ...
... The digitalization of most businesses will also require additional amounts [5]. Some [9] argue that a "tsunami" of data is about to be unleashed according to Fig. 1. [5,9]. An earlier prediction model for the entire information technology (IT) sector [5] includes the fact that energy efficient smartphones and tablets might be used instead of desktops and laptops for streaming videos. ...
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