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Interpreting animals in spaces of cohabitance: Ethical Questions

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The transnational practices of rescuing and rehoming unwanted animals with the help of specific animal ‘rescue’ organisations have become more widespread in the 2010s. These practices can be considered manifestations of a response to the perceived problems in dog breeding. They can also be understood in terms of interspecies care, a process comprising relational encounters and communications between humans and animals, interpretations of ‘animality’ in different spatial and temporal contexts, as well as situational practices. In this article, I explore the experiences of adopting a ‘rescue’ dog and the process in which the animal adapts to life in the home. Drawing from blogs published by adopters of rescue dogs in Finland, I ask whether the experiences of encountering and accommodating a rescue dog can be understood as performances of ‘everyday domestication’. An encounter with a rescue dog involves practices in which the animal is introduced to the spaces and relational networks in which they are expected to live. In the blogs, the dog–human relationship is communicated to the reader in a way that suits the culturally shared idea of living with a dog, including expectations of attachment and control, and interpretations of animal agency.
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The maintenance of the pedagogical relation, the teacher's relation to content, and the didactical relation were elements of the contents as well. In addition to these, the maintenance of teacher's pedagogical authority, the maintenance of the student's role or pedagogical authority, and the awareness of the nature of the content of instruction are included in the contents of teacher's tacit pedagogical knowing. The phenomenon of tacit pedagogical knowing was observed to be clearly a process-like and relational phenomenon. Based on the research results, a model of teacher's tacit pedagogical knowing was developed. Using the model, it is possible to illustrate the factors that are at the core of teacher's professionality. This model could be used in the context of teacher education, supervision, or in-service training. Tutkimus kohdistui luokanopettajien interaktiiviseen pedagogiseen ajatteluun ja toimintaan, erityisesti hiljaiseen pedagogiseen tietämiseen. 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In an economy where the only certainty is uncertainty, the one sure source of lasting competitive advantage is knowledge. Yet, few managers understand the true nature of the knowledge-creating company-let alone know how to manage it. According to this 1991 article by Japanese organizational theorist Ikujiro Nonaka, the problem is that most Western managers define knowledge-and what companies must do to exploit it-too narrowly. They believe that the only useful knowledge is "hard" (read "quantifiable") data. And they see the company as a kind of machine for information processing. Nonaka shows us another way to think about knowledge and its role in business organizations. He uses vivid examples from highly successful Japanese companies such as Honda, Canon, NEC, and Sharp. Managers at these companies recognize that creating new knowledge is not simply a matter of mechanistically processing objective information. Rather, it depends on tapping the tacit and often highly subjective insights, intuitions, and ideals of employees. The tools for making use of such knowledge are often soft"-such as slogans, metaphors, and symbols-but they are indispensable for continuous innovation. The reasons Japanese companies are especially adept at this holistic kind of knowledge creation are complex. But the key lesson for managers is quite simple: Much as manufacturers worldwide have learned from Japanese manufacturing techniques, companies that want to compete on the knowledge playing field must also learn from Japanese techniques of knowledge creation.
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Nearly everyone who cares about them believes that dogs and cats have a sense of self that renders them unique. Traditional science and philosophy declare such notions about our pets to be irrational and anthropomorphic. Animals, they say, have only the crudest form of thought and no sense of self at all. Leslie Irvine's If You Tame Me challenges these entrenched views by demonstrating that our experience of animals and their behavior tells a different story. Dogs and cats have been significant elements in human history and valued members of our households for centuries. Why do we regard these companions as having distinct personalities and as being irreplaceable? Leslie Irvine looks closely at how people form "connections" with dogs and cats available in adoption shelters and reflects on her own relationships with animals. If You Tame Me makes a persuasive case for the existence of a sense of self in companion animals and calls upon us to reconsider our rights and obligations regarding the non-human creatures in our lives.
  • Eileen Crist
Crist, Eileen (1999). Images of Animals. Anthropomorphism and Animal Mind. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.
Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships: A Global Exploration of Our Connections with Animals
  • Fabrizio Grieco
Grieco, Fabrizio (2007). "Human Observations of Animals, Subjective vs. Objective" in Marc Bekoff (ed.) Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships: A Global Exploration of Our Connections with Animals. Westport, CN: Greenwood Press, pp. 66-68.
Palvelijasta terapeutiksi: ihmisen ja hevosen suhteen muuttuvat kulttuuriset mallit Suomessa
  • Riitta-Marja Leinonen
Leinonen, Riitta-Marja (2013). Palvelijasta terapeutiksi: ihmisen ja hevosen suhteen muuttuvat kulttuuriset mallit Suomessa. Oulu: University of Oulu.