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Knee Injury Risk During Football Related Movement Patterns

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the knee movement patterns of athletes during the DVJ and compare those to more sport specific tasks, a weighted sled push (WSP), and a jump stop unanticipated cut (JSUC). American football players classified in low, moderate, or high risk for knee injury from the DVJ moved in a similar pattern when completing an unanticipated cut or pushing a sled.
Participants: 150 high school football players
participated. 58 linemen and 92 skill players.
Using a 3D motion capture system in association with
an IMU, subjects performed three trials of each task, the
DVJ, WSP, and JSUC (Figures 1, 2, 3)
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
REFERENCES
METHODSINTRODUCTION
5
The purpose of this study was to identify the knee
movement patterns of athletes during the DVJ and
compare those to more sport specific tasks, a weighted sled
push (WSP), and a jump stop unanticipated cut (JSUC).
PURPOSE
METHODS
METHODS
JSUC: Athletes completed a reaction jump stop and cut towards the direction randomly
displayed by an arrow pointing to the left or right. These trials were performed on a synthetic
turf surface with an embedded force platform.
Kinetic and kinematic data were recorded using 3D capture motion analysis. Peak knee
abduction moments were normalized to body weight. For analysis, the participants were
separated into tertiles of low risk (LR, n=50), moderate risk (MR, n=50), and high risk (HR,
n=50) from the knee moment of the DVJ. Multiple one-way analysis of variance tests (p<0.05)
were used to test for biomechanical differences between groups with post-hoc Bonferroni-
corrected pairwise comparison.
Football is one of the most popular high school sports in
the United States and is the sport with the leading
number of injuries.1,2 Approximately 20%of high
school football injuries involve the knee.
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common
in football and these athletes are four times more likely
to sustain ACL injuries than in other sports. 3,4
The drop vertical jump (DVJ) has been used to identify
athletes at high risk for ACL injury, however limited
research has been done on males. 5,6
Football players classified in low, moderate, or
high risk for knee injury from the DVJ moved in
similar pattern when completing an unanticipated
cut or pushing a sled.
Low quality patterns have been found to translate
to other sport related activities. Assessment and
monitoring of quality of movement can provide physical
therapists with information for the progression of
athletes to sport related tasks.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Standardized football cleats were donated by adidas
(adidas®crazyquick2.0, Portland, Oregon).
1. National Federation of State High School Associations. 2016-17 High School
Athletics Participation Survey Results
2. Shankar, Prasad R., et al. AJSM 2007; 35.8; 1295-1303.
3. Joseph AM, et al. J Athl Train. 2013;48(6):810-817.
4. Badgeley, Marcus A., et al. Journal of physical activity and health 10.2 (2013):
160-169.
5. Myer, Gregory D., et al. BJSM ; 2010; 72843.
6. Hewett, Timothy E., et al. NAJSPT; 2010; 5.4: 234.
Figure 2. Weighted Sled Push (WSP) Figure 3. Jump Stop Unanticipated Cut (JSUC )
Figure 1. Drop Vertical Jump (DVJ)
DVJ:Subjects dropped from a 31
cm box and performed a maximum
effort vertical jump.
WSP: Participants pushed a prowler
sled loaded with 75%body mass.
Moments were calculated during the
propulsion phase (initial forward
momentum to toe off) of the back
plant foot (Figure 2).
RESULTS
Knee Injury Risk During Football Related Movement Patterns
Monifa A. Williams1, Jeffrey B. Taylor1, Anh-Dung Nguyen2,
Audrey Westbrook1, Kevin R. Ford1
High Point University, Congdon School of Health Sciences
1Department of Physical Therapy | 2Department of Athletic Training
Drop Vertical Jump
APTA Combined Sections Meeting; Washington, DC January 23rd January 26th 2019
Weighted Sled Push
Figure 5 External knee adduction (top) and abduction (bottom) moments
during WSP
Jump Stop Unanticipated Cut
p<0.001
p=0.005 p=0.029
p<0.001 H-L
M-L
H-L
H-L
M-L
H-M
H-L
Figure 6 External knee adduction (top) and abduction (bottom)
moments during JSUC
Figure 4 External knee abduction moments during DVJ
High Risk
Low Risk
High Risk
Low Risk
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