Article

Biotechnologisch erzeugter Mooswirkstoff verbessert die Widerstandsfähigkeit der Haut

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Abstract

Moose haben substantiell dazu beigetragen, die Erde zu einem grünen Planeten zu machen, bevor Gefässpflanzen überhaupt existiert haben. Moose enthalten Gene und Proteine für eine aussergewöhnliche Anpassungsfähigkeit, welche den Höheren Pflanzen verlorengegangen ist. Biotechnologie ermöglicht die sterile Produktion des Mooses Physcomitrella patens auf eine nachhaltige und reproduzierbare Art und Weise. MossCellTec™ No. 1 ist der erste kosmetische Wirkstoff basierend auf biotechnologisch hergestelltem Moos. Wir haben in diesem Forschungsprojekt die Bedeutung der Zellkernvitalität (cell nucleus health) als einen neuen Anti-Aging Ansatz untersucht. Interessanterweise war ein Moosextrakt in der Lage, die Expression von cell nucleus health Markern in alten Hautzellen zu verbessern. Zusätzlich verbesserte der Mooswirkstoff die heiss-feucht/kalt-trocken Anpassung von rekonstruierter Haut und erhöhte die Hautbarriere, -feuchtigkeit und Ebenmässigkeit des Hauttons in einer placebokontrollierten klinischen Studie. Dieser Mooswirkstoff kann deshalb die Widerstandsfähigkeit der Haut gegen Umweltveränderungen verbessern.

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