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Students, Peer Pressure and their Academic Performance in School

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International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019 300
ISSN 2250-3153
http://dx.doi.org/10.29322/IJSRP.9.01.2019.p8541 www.ijsrp.org
Students, Peer Pressure and their Academic
Performance in School
Vangie M. Moldes1
Cherry Lyn L. Biton2
Divine Jean Gonzaga3
Jerald C. Moneva4
Students, Jagobiao National High School Senior High Department1 2 3
Adviser, Teacher, Jagobiao National High School 4
DOI: 10.29322/IJSRP.9.01.2019.p8541
http://dx.doi.org/10.29322/IJSRP.9.01.2019.p8541
ABSTRACT
Adolescent have higher tendency to experience peer pressure in school. Peer pressure is clustered in four categories such as
social belongingness, curiosity, cultural-parenting orientation of parents and education, this research design used is descriptive
correlation. The researchers conducted the survey among the students in the Senior High School. With 96 respondents who completed
the survey. Quantitative data were processed by using chi-square. The result would show the correlation between the perceived level
of peer pressure in terms of social belongingness, curiosity, cultural-parenting orientation of parents and education. Generally,
students are expected to face the effects of peer pressure optimistically to cope up the negative impact of peer pressure in their studies.
Students may use positive or negative approach towards peer pressure. Teacher may guide and help them in facing the problems.
Keywords: Cultural-Parenting Orientation, Curiosity, Peer Pressure, Social Belongingness
I. Rationale / Introduction
Peer pressure is often seen during the adolescence stage of a teenagers because they often seek comfort among their peers and
intend to do what their peers does without knowing if it is good or bad for them. Adolescence is a period of an individual that is
transitory when a child reaches the point in changing its childhood to adulthood (Adeniyi & Kolawole, 2015). Thus individuals are
prone temptations in the social contextualization concepts, for example, socializing with others tend to do some activities such as
napping and drinking during classes or work day ( Bonein & Denont- Boemont, 2013).
Adolescence social environment could affect teenagers in their adolescence, because mostly in this period teenagers tend to
communicate more by their peers. As children grow and reach adolescence, teenagers become more dependent with their peers than
their family especially in making choices and enhancing their moral values in life (Uslu, 2013).
Human development is affected by its socialization with other people in the environment. Specifically the academic
achievements of students are conjectured to be correlational by the support given by the parents, the teachers and the peer of teenagers
that affect their level of academic performance (Chen, 2008). In general teenagers spend more time with peers. Peer pressure is
described to have a positive and negative impact among individuals and even without effect to a person because peer pressure is a
continuous learning (Gulati, 2017).
Peer pressure often seems to have various effects toward the student academic performance in school. It is how their peers
affect them whether in a positive or negative way. Teenagers need to seek comfort from others that they found in the presence of their
peers, and they are not even aware on how their peers influence them academically.
Eventually this study aimed to know the relationship of peer pressure the Senior High School Students and their academic
performance.
Review of Related Literature
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Studies show that the influence of peer groups among student can boost their anxiety especially pertaining to their education
(Kadir, Atmowasdoyo & Salija 2018). The relationship within the group with its peers are co-related with each other, hence the
direction of this particular relationship should be monitored were these relationships should go considering all possible factors
correlated within the groups outcome (Wilson, 2016). Peer pressure faced by many teenagers of the society, professionals understood
the concept of peer influence that could affect teenagers in a negative way which can be prevented by educating and preparing
teenagers to face the negative aspects caused by peer pressure (Temitope & Og0nsakin, 2015). Similarly peer influence among
teenagers does not directly affect them in a negative way but it varies in how much and how the students receive the climate of the
peers coming from the group (Mosha, 2017). When a student is influenced and motivated by peers he will perform excellent at school
and got good grades in mathematics (Boechnke, 2018). Getting the support needed coming from the peer group, student tend to excel
and exceed its capability and concentrate more pertaining to his studies and do good in the academic tasks in school (Olalekan, 2016).
Adolescence gaining social support from its peers is an important factor to cope with different problems and illnesses by
letting go of emotions by talking someone. Social support plays an important role for teenagers to lessen the effects of stressful
situations and stressors through the support of the peers in the group (Esen & Gundogdu 2010). Despite the various studies conducted
for understanding the effects of peer group in student’s academic performance, no one has yet understood the nature of peer effects
among students (Zhang, 2010). Knowing how the teenagers interact with their peers and how they interact with each other and how
presence of peer group affect student’s academic achievement in school plays an important role for various categories and even the
whole educational system (Leka, 2015). Peer pressure is commonly described as peers encouraging other teenagers to do things
(Santor, Messervey & Kusumakar, 2000). Peer pressure is also caused by parent’s lack of supervision towards their children during
adolescence, children tend to enjoy their peers company and spend with their peers more during the adolescence period (Puligni,
1993). There are different factors that could affects student’s academic performance in school whether it’s their family is giving
proper guidance and motivation to their children with the healthy and harmonies interaction with their surroundings (Ezzarrooki,
2016). Students interactions with its peers could help enhance their capability and increase their academic performance in school
because they could seek help from their peers that could serve as a motivation than working alone (Sotinis, Mirco & Michael, 2013).
Student peer group in school plays as an in socializing teenager with the peers to socialize with each other that help should the child
adolescents (Uzezi & Deya, 2017). Interaction of students between its peer are likely to influence the students and can be crucial for
the student to determine their choice and could affect student performance ( De Giorgi ,n.d.).
Understanding peer influence towards teenagers is important for developing and understanding how to improve
socioeconomic policies (Carman & Zhang, 2011). Peer among youth plays a vital role during the adolescence of a teenager. This is the
time when teenagers develop deep friendship among their peers and become permanent during their adolescence (Guzman, 2017).
Peer pressure towards persons behavior is said to be a social phenomenon where the members of a particular society or may not be
influence negatively but majority are affected by the undesirable behavior of those people who resist what others do (Gulati, 2017).
Looking to the different group of factors that influence adolescence in their completion of their academic excellence it is further
hindered by developmental challenges (Chen, 2008). An individual seek emotional support towards communicating publicly and
showing his private objectives or goals. Indeed through showing your emotions to others individual can get emotional benefits from it
because it could help them to overcome temptation and could give them emotional benefits. (Borein & Boemont, 2013). Also, peer
groups answer questions from teenager different concern from adolescence stage including physical appearance or changing bodies
(Ademiyi & Kolawole, 2015).
Peer pressure could easily affect the self-esteem of students that an important factor adolescence. Individual adapt attitudes
towards a certain aspect that they encountered or they are aware of (Uslu, 2013). In many events student fantasizing and visualizing
what they dreamed to became through with their colleagues atmosphere. Eventually, they pursue their choices through with the
influence of peer pressure (Owoyele & Toyobo, 2008). The pressure among peer group among its member may engage to do
undesired things or negative behavior with the presence of a particular peer group leader who engage its member to do deviant acts or
promote undesirable things to the group (Dumas, Ellis, & Wolfe, 2012).
Peer group is important in the social context that plays a vital role in society and to determine the academic achievement that
affect during development relatively with each other (Chen, 2008). Adaptive behavior of the development increases become broader
and complex and as the age increases (Yonus, Mushtaq & Qaiser n.d.). School that the students attend to serves an institution among
students that determine their learning capacity based on the school environment that gives the learning experience toward students
(Korir, 2014). Thus choosing major courses within an institution are major choices a student intends to make but it is affected by their
interactions among other students (Porter & Umbach, 2006). Hence, the behavior of an individual have seen similarities among the
group due to the effect of their peers, it is still difficult to relate the consequences that the individual within the group are similar with
each other or social to be pursuing their intentions together to have similar outcomes (Kremer & Levy, 2008). Interactions between
students with their agemates appeal to enhance their learning capacity under the guidance of an adult educator (Kinderman, 2016).
Therefore, Peer Pressure cannot directly be shown to have negative or positive impact towards students’ academic performance
but one can realize the appropriate coping mechanism for a problem as a technique to avoid and fight peer pressure optimistically.
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II. Research Elaborations
This contains the researcher design, research environment, respondents, instruments and data gathering.
Design
This research study used the descriptive correlation design of the variables covering social belongingness, curiosity, cultural-
parenting orientation and education. This design used survey guide as a tool to gathered data.
Environment
This study will be conducted in Jagobiao, Mandaue City in the school of Jagobiao National High School known before as
Mabini National High School which was built in 1984. By 2015, this institution recommended the k to 12 Curriculum program that
recommended by Department of Education. The School consist of three Academic Tracks namely ABM (Accountancy and Business
Management), HUMSS (Humanities and Social Sciences) and GAS (General Academic Strand). The student’s in Jagobiao National
High School suits as the respondents for this research in order to collect data.
Respondents
This survey focuses on the Grade 12 Senior High School Students in Jagobiao National High School. Consisting three sections
namely ABM (Accountancy and Business Management), HUMSS (Humanities and Social Sciences) and GAS (General Academic
Strand). The respondents we’re chosen because they are the appropriate respondents to answer the specific questions.
Instruments
In this study, the researcher use the survey questionnaire in gathering of data, this survey design provides a quantitative
description of some fraction of the population that is sample through the data collection process. Questionnaire is being use in data
collection instrument for the study. In the sampling stratified sampling in being applied in this study, under the weighted mean
statistics.
Data Gathering
The researchers used the survey method to find out the Effects of Peer Pressure in the Academic Performance of Students. In
gathering of data, researcher will ask permission to the Administer teacher for that section and also for the students who chosen to be
as respondents for the study.
In collecting data, the questionnaire given by the researcher personally and a clean sheet of paper to the respondents for the
students would put their answers. The answer of the respondents were collected and it was used in order to tabulate data interpret.
Treatment of Data
The data will be treated using a chi-square. It is a testing of the relationship between the categorical variables and its null
hypothesis (Ho) represents on relationship at all with the independents such as categorical variables in the population.
III. RESULTS OR FINDINGS
This chapter presents the findings, analysis, discussion and interpretation of data gathered wherein the objective is to know
the Students, Peer Pressure and their Academic Performance in School.
Table 1. Level of Students Social Belongingness
Indicators
Weighted
Mean
Interpretation
1. I spend much time with my peer group
3.41
Agree
2. My friends and I share problems with each other
3.79
Agree
3. My friends give me advice in my problems.
3.81
Agree
4. My friend and I do school activities.
3.57
Agree
5.I and my friends share thoughts and opinions to strengthen our
3.79
Agree
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bond.
Overall Weighted Mean
3.68
Agree
Legend: Strongly Agree(4.01-5.00), Agree(3.26-4.00), Neutral (2.51-3.25), Disagree(1.76-2.50), Strongly Disagree(1.00-
The table above shows the weighted mean of the perceived level of peer pressure in terms of social belongingness of
grade 12 students. Students perceived that they agree with the term that they are accompanied by their peers in school. The table
shows that student is likely to socialize among others and seeks attention with their peers. Students agree that they should belong to a
particular group in school whom they could associate and share their thoughts and opinion regarding school. Overall, students agree
that they need their peers and belong to a peer group, thus it could help them share their own perspective and capacity as individuals.
Table 2. Level of Students Curiosity
Indicators
Weighted Mean
Interpretation
1. I like to do something new
4.08
Agree
2. I want to explore my capabilities to do things
4.18
Agree
3. I am curious about having vices
3.14
Neutral
4. I want to explore my teenage years
4.16
Agree
5. I want to experience relationship
3.19
Neutral
6. I like starting a new activity
3.92
Agree
Overall Weighted Mean
3.78
Agree
Legend: Strongly Agree(4.01-5.00), Agree(3.26-4.00), Neutral (2.51-3.25), Disagree(1.76-2.50), Strongly Disagree(1.00-1.75)
The table above shows the weighted mean of the perceived level of peer pressure in terms of curiosity of grade 12 students. In
terms of the content, the statement “I want to explore my capabilities to do things” has the highest weighted mean of 4.18, interpreted
as agree. This indicates that adolescents like to explore their capabilities to do things and enjoy their life as a teenager. For the
statement “I want to explore my teenage year”, “I like to do something new” and “I like starting new activity” has the weighted mean
of 4.16,4.08 and 3.92 respectively and interpreted as agree. This implies that student want to explore, like to do something new things
and want to engage in starting new activity. On the other side, the statements “I want to experience relationship” and “I am curious
about having vices” has the weighted mean of 3.19 and 3.14 respectively interpreted which is neutral and as adolescents are likely
want experience relationship and are curious in having vices. The overall weighted mean of the perceived level of peer pressure in
terms of curiosity is 3.78 which signify that adolescents agree to explore their teenage year.
Table 3. Level of Students Cultural-Parenting Orientation
Indicators
Interpretation
1. I have to ask my parent permission to do most things
Agree
2. My parent worry that I am up to something they won't like
Agree
3. My parent want me to follow their directions even if I disagree with
their reasons
Agree
4. My parent encourage me to give my ideas and opinions even if I
might disagree
Neutral
5. My parent warn me not to go out along with my friends at night
Agree
Overall Weighted Mean
Agree
Legend: Strongly Agree(4.01-5.00), Agree(3.26-4.00), Neutral (2.51-3.25), Disagree(1.76-2.50), Strongly Disagree(1.00-1.75)
The table above shows the weighted mean of the perceived level of peer pressure in terms of cultural- parenting of parents
towards their peers of grade 12 students, the statement “I have to ask my parents’ permission to do most things” has the highest
weighted mean of 3.97. This indicates that students need to ask the permission of their parents to do things they want. For the
statement “ My parents warn me not to go out along with my friends at night”, “My parents worry that I am up to something they
won’t like” and “My parents want me to follow their directions even if I disagree with their reasons” has the weighted mean of 3.80,
3.79 and 3.44 respectively and interpreted as agree. Implies that likely parents won’t the idea that their children go out with peers at
night and likely to do things they won’t like or agree. On the other side, the statement “My parents encourage to give my ideas and
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opinions even if I might disagree” has the lowest weighted mean of 3.30 interpreted as neutral which means that children whether like
or disagree the reasons of their parents to give their ideas and opinion to their parents. The overall weighted mean for the perceived
level of peer pressure in terms of cultural-parenting orientation is 3.67 which mean that adolescents agree to the reasons their parents
signifies.
Table 4. Level of Students in Education
Indicators
Weighted
Mean
Interpretation
1. My friends help me on what to do in my academic performance in
school
3.73
Agree
2. My friends inspire me to work hard in my studies
3.76
Agree
3. We always help each other with academic difficulties
3.49
Agree
4. I am always focused in class with my peers
3.49
Agree
5. My friends assistance in group assisted to improve my grades
3.61
Agree
Overall Weighted Mean
3.60
Agree
Legend: Strongly Agree(4.01-5.00), Agree(3.26-4.00), Neutral (2.51-3.25), Disagree(1.76-2.50), Strongly Disagree(1.00-1.75)
Students perceived that they agreed with the term that in education they need their friends in school in order succeed and
accomplish certain school works and activities. The table shows that student’s education, they need the presence of their peers to help
them do their school works and inspire them to work hard pertaining in their studies. And students agree and contented by the
presence they get from their peers, thus it help them achieved their goals and excel academically. Overall, students agree with
presence and support given by their peers toward in school and their studies. Thus, it helped them as individuals.
TABLE 6.
Summary of Results
Factors
X2
Df
X2 (0.05)
Discussion
Interpretation
Social Belongingness
10.12
3
7.81
Reject
Significant
Curiosity
7.24
6
12.6
Failed to Reject
Not Significant
Cultural Parenting Orientation
16.30
6
12.6
Reject
Significant
Education
7.48
6
12.6
Failed to Reject
Not Significant
The table above shows the value of computed chi-square x2 (10.12) in terms of social belongingness is less than the
computed critical value (7.81) which reject the null hypothesis- thus, significant. This implies that social belongingness can influence
the student’s level of performance in school. Social belongingness can affect students’ academic excellence pertaining in their studies.
Individual displays interest in communicating to public about his personal concern and objectives. Likely, displaying emotions to
others can give emotional benefits to a person thus it helps him to overcome temptation in life (Bonein & Denant-Boemont, 2013).
Positive outcomes in relation to students peer association likely to occur when student environment drives the students to engage their
desired activities that is motivated by their peers to continue to strive to reach possible outcome (Korir & Kipkemboi, 2014).
The value of computed chi-square in terms of curiosity x2 (7.24) is less than the computed critical value (12.6), which failed
to reject the null hypothesis, there is a significant difference. It state that there is no correlation between student’s curiosity and their
level of academic performance in school relatively and it could affect their grades and academic performance. It contradicts to the
statement that student’s curiosity could lead to academic failure and could have a negative impact in their studies. For instance,
adolescents who commit explanation of substance abuse through engaging with their peers likely to make unhealthy decisions in their
life that could interfere their life goals and make inconsistent choices (Dumas, Ellis & Wolfe, 2012). And also, peer pressure is the
main indicator of teenagers into engaging drugs because they begin to adapt this kind of lifestyle among their acquaintances (Gulati,
2017).
The computed value x2 (16.30) in terms of cultural-parenting orientation towards students by their parents is greater than the
critical value (12.6). The null hypothesis is rejected therefore, significant. This entails that cultural-parenting orientation of the parents
towards their children with their peers has a significant association that could affect certain views and opinion towards peer
association. Parent’s relationship with their children during adolescence became wider as children perspective in relationship found
their peers more suited especially in their developmental needs as a growing adult (Fuligni & Eccles, 2014). When children became
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teenagers parents should realize that children will find their way to fit in a certain group in their age and the world alike (Olalekan,
2016).
The value of computed chi-square x2(7.48) in terms of education is less than the computed critical value (12.6), which fails to
reject the null hypothesis. Thus, there is no significant difference. This implies that peer group along with student education cannot
affect their studies. Therefore, peer group in student’s level of academic performance in school is not associated with each other.
Adolescence is a stage where children particularly seeks socialization with their age group that will exhibit different behavior and
attitude which occur through their interaction, thus a child will learn more by engaging and interacting with their peers (Cuzezi &
Deya, 2017). Friendship among youth will allow them to develop their necessary social skills towards other for them foster as an
individual and reach future success (Guzman, 2007).
IV. Conclusion
Graduating senior high school students have encountered different factors in relation to students peer pressure in school and
its association in their studies in terms of social belongingness, curiosity, cultural-parenting orientation of parents and education. The
results declared that there are several factors that could affect students’ academic performance in school regarding to peer pressure.
This suggests that peer pressure does not give negative impact directly to student toward their peers.
Generally, students peer pressure in school affects the academic performance among students in term of various content.
Furthermore, cultural parenting among parents among parents and social belongingness can affect student academic performance in
school based on the result of the computation of chi-square. It had been manifested that curiosity and students level of education does
not affect student academic performance. Hence, whatever the effects of student peer pressure are based their approach towards their
peers.
APPENDIX A
Students Peer Pressure and their Academic Performance in school
Personal Information
Name:
Age: Gender:
Direction: Please answer the following items with all honesty. The information that will be gathered by the researchers shall be held
with utmost confidentiality.
How does peer pressure affect students in school?
Social belongingness
5
4
3
2
1
1. I spend much time with my peer group
2. My friends and I share problems with each other
3. My friends give me advice in my problems
4. My friends and I do school activities together
5. I and my friends share thoughts and opinions to strengthen our bond
CURIOSITY
1. I like to do something new
2. I want to explore my capabilities to do things
3. I am curious about having vices
4. I want to explore my teenage years
5. I want to experience relationship
6. I like starting a new activity.
Cultural-Parenting Orientation
5
4
3
2
1
1. I have to ask my parents permission to do most things
2. My parents worry that I am up to something they won’t like
3. My parents want me to follow their directions even if I disagree with their reasons
4. My parents encourage me to give my ideas and opinions even if I might disagree
5. My parents warn me not to go out along with my friends at night
2. Educational
5
4
3
2
1
1. My friends help me on what to do in my academic performance in school
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2. My friends inspire me to work hard in my studies
3. We always help each other with academic difficulties
4. I am always focused in class with my peers
5. My friends assistance in group discussion assisted to improve my grades
Legend: Strongly Agree(4.01-5.00), Agree(3.26-4.00), Neutral (2.51-3.25), Disagree(1.76-2.50), Strongly Disagree(1.00-1.75)
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Education
Region VII, Central Visayas
Division of Mandaue City
JAGOBIAO NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
North Road, Jagobiao, Mandaue City
In the ___ day of August 2018
MRS. ARLINA YAP AMANTE
Pricipal IV
Jagobiao National High School
North Road Jagobiao, Mandaue City
Dear Mrs. Arlina Y. Amante:
The students of Accountancy and Business Management ABM-12 of Senior High School are currently conducting a research as a
partial requirement of the subject Practical Research 2 Quantitative Research for the school year 2018-2019.
As a part of completing subject, we need to conduct a quantitative study titled ”Students, Peer Pressure and their Academic
Performance in School.” In this instance, we intent to ask your permission to allow us to gather descriptive data from the Senior High
School Students of Jagobiao National High School.
We are hoping for your approval.
Very truly yours,
VANGIE M.MOLDES __________________________
CHERRY LYN L. BITON __________________________
DIVINE GONZAGA __________________________
Researchers
Noted by: Approved by:
JERALD MONEVA ARLINA YAP AMANTE
Principal IV
KARIE ALYZA M. TROMPETA
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Teachers in Senior High School
APPENDIX C
Summary of the computation
Content
Weighted Mean
Interpretation
1. I spend much time with my peer group
3.41
Agree
2. My friends and I share problems with each other
3.79
Agree
3. My friends give me advice in my problems.
3.81
Agree
4. My friend and I do school activities.
3.57
Agree
5.I and my friends share thoughts and opinions to strengthen our bond.
3.79
Agree
Total:
3.68
Agree
Table 1. Summary of computation in Social Belongingness Aspect
Content
Weighted Mean
Interpretation
1. I like to do something new
4.08
Agree
2. I want to explore my capabilities to do things
4.18
Agree
3. I am curious about having vices
3.14
Neutral
4. I want to explore my teenage years
4.16
Agree
5. I want to experience relationship
3.19
Neutral
6. I like starting a new activity
3.92
Agree
Total:
3.78
Agree
Table 2. Summary of computation in Curiosity Aspect
Content
Weighted Mean
Interpretation
1. I have to ask my parent permission to do most things
3.97
Agree
2. My parent worry that I am up to something they won't like
3.79
Agree
3. My parent want me to follow their directions even if I disagree with
their reasons
3.44
Agree
4. My parent encourage me to give my ideas and opinions even if I might
disagree
3.30
Neutral
5. My parent warn me not to go out along with my friends at night
3.80
Agree
Total:
3.67
Agree
Table 3. Summary of computation in Cultural Parenting Orientation Aspect
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Content
Weighted Mean
Interpretation
1. My friends help me on what to do in my academic
performance in school
3.73
Agree
2. My friends inspire me to work hard in my studies
3.76
Agree
3. We always help each other with academic difficulties
3.49
Agree
4. I am always focused in class with my peers
3.49
Agree
5. My friends assistance in group assisted to improve my grades
3.61
Agree
Total:
3.60
Agree
Table 4. Summary of computation Education Aspect
Table 5. Grade level of Grade 12 Students
Social
Belongingness
1.00-3.40
3.41-5.00
Total:
90-94
7
8
15
85-89
15
20
35
80-84
14
19
33
75-79
7
6
13
Total:
43
53
96
Curiosity
1.00-3.40
3.41-4.20
41.21-5.00
Total:
90-94
4
9
1
14
85-89
14
13
9
36
80-84
11
12
10
33
75-79
4
7
2
13
Total:
33
41
22
96
Cultural
Parenting
Orientation
1.00-3.40
3.41-4.20
41.21-5.00
Total:
90-94
6
6
2
14
85-89
16
14
7
37
80-84
12
18
2
33
75-79
9
3
1
13
Total:
43
41
12
96
Educational
1.00-3.40
3.41-4.20
41.21-5.00
Total:
90-94
8
4
2
14
85-89
15
15
5
35
80-84
13
20
1
34
75-79
7
5
1
13
Total:
43
44
9
96
Peer Pressure
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Students
Social
belongingness
Curiosity
Cultural
Parenting
Education
Student 1
2
3
3.8
2.2
Student 2
2.8
3.16
3.2
2.2
Student 3
3.8
4.33
3
3.4
Student 4
2.6
4
4
3
Student 5
3.6
3.83
3.8
3.6
Student 6
3.8
3.33
4.2
3.2
Student 7
3.6
2.15
3.4
3
Student 8
3.8
2.83
2
3
Student 9
3
3.33
3.4
3
Student 10
3.2
4.16
4
3.4
Student 11
3.8
3.33
3.4
3.2
Student 12
3.6
3.36
2.8
3.4
Student 13
4.4
3.35
4.2
4.4
Student 14
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.4
Student 15
4.2
4.66
4.2
4
Student 16
3.8
4
3.4
4
Student 17
4
3
2.8
4
Student 18
4
3
2.8
48
Student 19
3.8
3.66
3.4
3.8
Student 20
2.8
2.66
3.6
3.8
Student 21
3.6
4
3
3.8
Student 22
4.2
4
4
4
Student 23
5
4.16
4
5
Student 24
3.8
4.5
4.6
4.6
Student 25
4.4
5
4.6
4.4
Student 26
4.6
3.5
4.8
4.8
Student 27
3.4
3.66
3.6
3.8
Student 28
3
3.83
3.8
1.4
Student 29
3.8
5
2.8
3.4
Student 30
2.8
2.66
4.8
2.4
Student 31
1.4
5
1
2
Student 32
3.4
4.16
5
3.2
Student 33
3.6
3.66
3.6
3.4
Student 34
4
4
4
4
Student 35
4.2
4
3.4
4
Student 36
4
3.5
3.6
4
Student 37
4
4.33
3.2
3.6
Student 38
3.8
3.33
4
2.6
Student 39
4
4.5
3.2
3.6
Student 40
4.2
4.33
3.6
3
Student 41
3.8
4
3.6
4.2
Student 42
4.6
4
4
4.6
Student 43
3.8
3.38
3
3.6
Student 44
4
3.33
3.6
3.6
Student45
3.6
3.16
3.4
3.8
Student 46
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.8
Student 47
3.4
3.33
3.6
3
Student 48
4.6
3.33
4
3.6
Student 49
3.8
3.33
4
3.6
Student 50
4
4
4.4
5
Student 51
4.2
3.16
3.6
4
Student 52
4.8
4
3.2
4
Student 53
4
3.66
5
4.6
Student 54
4.2
5
4.8
4.6
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
We thank all who in one way or another contributed in the completion of this research. First , we give thanks to our God for
protection and ability to do work.
Specially and heartily thank to our subject teacher, Dr. Jerald C. Moneva who encouraged and directed us. His challenges
brought this work to a completion. It is with his supervision that this work came into existence. For any faults we take full
responsibility.
Student 55
3.4
4
3
3.2
Student 56
3.4
3.66
3.6
3.6
Student 57
3.4
4.33
2.8
4
Student 58
4
3.5
4
3
Student 59
3.2
4
4
4.2
Student 60
4
4.83
4.4
4
Student 61
2.2
3.83
2.83
2.8
Student 62
3.4
3.33
4.2
3.4
Student 63
4
3.83
4.8
3
Student 64
3.6
4.33
3.6
3.6
Student 65
4
4.16
3.6
4
Student 66
3.8
3.33
3
1.9
Student 67
2.8
5
1.4
1.6
Student 68
4.4
4.17
3.6
3.6
Student 69
3.6
3.83
3
3
Student 70
3.8
4.33
4.2
2.6
Student 71
4.8
3.83
4.2
4.4
Student 72
2.4
3.67
3.4
3.6
Student 73
4.6
4.83
4.8
4.2
Student 74
3.6
3.5
3.2
4.2
Student 75
3.8
4.33
4.2
4
Student 76
4.4
4.33
4.4
4.4
Student 77
4
4.33
3.6
4
Student 78
2.8
2.33
3.4
2.6
Student 79
3.6
3.33
3.6
3.8
Student 80
3
2.5
2.5
3
Student 81
3.6
3.70
3.6
4
Student 82
4.6
4.83
3.4
4
Student 83
3.4
4
5
3.8
Student 84
2.6
2.17
3.2
3.6
Student 85
2.8
4.83
3
2.6
Student 86
3.8
3.33
4.4
4
Student 87
3.8
3.33
3
4
Student 88
3.8
4.5
4.2
4.4
Student 89
3
3.67
2.8
4
Student 90
3.2
4
3.8
3.8
Student 91
3
3.83
4
3.4
Student 92
3.6
3.5
4
3.8
Student 93
3.8
3.17
4.8
4
Student 94
3.4
3.17
4
3
Student 95
3.4
3.17
4
4.2
Student 96
3.6
4
4
3
Average:
4
4
4
4
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We are also deeply thankful to our respondents. With their names withhold, but we want to acknowledge and appreciate their
cooperation during our data gathering. Their information helped us complete this research.
We also thank our family who encouraged us and prayed for us throughout the time of our research. We are heartily thankful to
our parents who support us financially for the completion of this research.
May the Almighty God richly bless all of you.
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ABSTRACTThis study examines the relationship between adolescents’ self-esteem and peer pressure degrees according to their gender and socioeconomic status. The data were obtained from 500 high school students using the Self-efficacy Expectation Scale, developed by Rosenberg (1965) and adapted by Cuhadaroglu (1986) and Kıran-Esen (2006), and the “Peer Pressure Scale (PPS), developed by Kıran (2002). Findings show that when adolescents’ peer pressure degree is viewed according to their level of income, their self-esteem degree is higher with middle income level and vice versa with higher income level. Another finding is that adolescents with lower income level are exposed to further peer pressure than middle and high income level. Self-esteem degree is negatively affected by peer pressure. However, there is a positive correlation between their self-esteem degree and indirect peer pressure and further analysis shows that there’s a negative correlation between their status of being exposed to direct or indirect peer pressure. Adolescents with direct peer pressure perceive that indirect pressure is less than the others (PDF) Relationship between degrees of self-esteem and peer pressure in high school adolescents. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/314524207_Relationship_between_degrees_of_self-esteem_and_peer_pressure_in_high_school_adolescents [accessed Jan 09 2019].
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