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Supporting QoE/QoS-aware end-to-end network slicing in future 5G-enabled optical networks

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... As exposed in the introduction section, orchestration of per-segment configurations brings a challenge to the definition of the 5G-enabled architecture. In this way, and following our previous definitions on this matter [17], this work Fig. 3 Relation between 3GPP 5G network resource model and ETSI NFV information model furtherly introduces a software component capable of achieving service provisioning and maintenance through network slicing by means of the slice composition technique, besides serving as the correlation entity between network slicing and NFV related information models. More specifically, the defined NFV Coordinator (NFV-C) component looks forward in serving as a middle-point between service clients/tenants connected via Operation Support Systems (OSS)/Business Support Systems (BSS) and the components of the 5G Architecture. ...
... In [17], we analysed this particular use case by emulating work traffic between VMs by using the iPerf network tool. The idea was to try to saturate the allocated communication channel, so to reach the PLR threshold of 1 percent. ...
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The current deployment of 5G networks in a way to support the highly demanding service types defined for 5G, has brought the need for using new techniques to accommodate legacy networks to such requirements. Network Slicing in turn, enables sharing the same underlying physical infrastructure among services with different requirements, thus providing a level of isolation between them to guarantee their proper functionality. In this work, we analyse from an architectural point of view, the required coordination for the provisioning of 5G services over multiple network segments/domains by means of network slicing, considering as well the use of sensors and actuators to maintain slices performance during its lifetime. We set up an experimental multi-segment testbed to demonstrate end-to-end service provisioning and its guarantee in terms of specific QoS parameters, such as latency, throughput and Virtual Network Function (VNF) CPU/RAM consumption. The results provided, demonstrate the workflow between different network components to coordinate the deployment of slices, besides providing a set of examples for slice maintenance through service monitoring and the use of policy-based actuations.
... There have been studies on QoS provisioning for network slices [28][29][30]. These studies make use of the programmability of both control and data planes. ...
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Through the concept of network slicing, a single physical network infrastructure can be split into multiple logically-independent Network Slices (NS), each of which is customized for the needs of its respective individual user or industrial vertical. In the beyond 5G (B5G) system, this customization can be done for many targeted services, including, but not limited to, 5G use cases and beyond 5G. The network slices should be optimized and customized to stitch a suitable environment for targeted industrial services and verticals. This paper proposes a novel Quality of Service (QoS) framework that optimizes and customizes the network slices to ensure the service level agreement (SLA) in terms of end-to-end reliability, delay, and bandwidth communication. The proposed framework makes use of network softwarization technologies, including software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV), to preserve the SLA and ensure elasticity in managing the NS. This paper also mathematically models the end-to-end network by considering three parts: radio access network (RAN), transport network (TN), and core network (CN). The network is modeled in an abstract manner based on these three parts. Finally, we develop a prototype system to implement these algorithms using the open network operating system (ONOS) as a SDN controller. Simulations are conducted using the Mininet simulator. The results show that our QoS framework and the proposed resource allocation algorithms can effectively schedule network resources for various NS types and provide reliable E2E QoS services to end-users.
... The wide variety of eHealth services imposes different QoS requirements on the underlying networks. Aspects such as tolerance to delay are service requirements ranging from strict real-time and delay intolerant data transmission [22,23]. Another aspect is application data sensitivity to loss, with conversational voice based applications that often tolerate some packet loss, while data transmission (e.g., medical image transfer) is highly losses intolerant [24]. ...
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The QoE measurement has become a novel theme today. To achieve a quality service and minimize the negative impact that traffic on network can cause, it’s very important to manage the devices that intervene in this service. Hence, the QoE evaluation allows obtaining benefits both customers and service providers. The main objective of this paper is to measure QoE of a teleconsultation application in Mental Health named Psiconnect, using an approach based on pentagram model. For the QoE evaluation of Psiconnect application we used the pentagram model based on the measurement of 5 factors (integrality, retainability, availability, usability, and instantaneousness). This model allows to design quantifiable metrics for quality evaluations. Using the model cited the value of QoE for Psiconnect is 1.793 (between 1.6 and 1.8). Comparing with Mean Opinion Scores (MOS) test, some users are dissatisfied with the use of the application although the result is near 1.8, so the most of users are satisfied with the use of teleconsultation service based in Skype in the Psiconnect app. There are different models to measure QoE having into account subjective parameters. This is important an estimation of QoE in a quantitative form. Other models can be used to improve the quality of apps.
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Along with the development of 5G, NS plays an important role in the application of mobile networks to meet all kinds of personalized requirements. In terms of NS concept, network operators can vertically split a physical network into multiple logically separate networks to flexibly meet QoS requirements, which are mainly represented as higher bandwidth and lower latency. In this article, we propose a novel QoS framework of NS in 5G and beyond networks based on SDN and NFV to guarantee key QoS indicators for different application scenarios, such as eMBB, mMTC and URLLC. In this QoS framework, a 5G network is divided into three parts, RAN, TN and CN, to form three types of NS with different network resource allocation algorithms. The performance evaluation in the simulation environment of Mininet shows that the proposed QoS framework can steer different flows into different queues of OVS, schedule network resources for various NS types and provide reliable E2E QoS for users according to preconfigured QoS requirements.
Chapter
Network slicing has been taking a major role in upcoming 5G network implementations. However, in order to provision and maintain end-to-end slices, the management and orchestration among different network segments is required. As a result, techniques and components have risen to fulfil these tasks. In this work, we present latency-aware slicing, which is enabled by the provisioning of network slices equipped with an end-to-end latency sensor. This sensor is added to the service chain, allowing for real time monitoring and eventually actuation upon latency requirements violations. Moreover, we introduce an architecture capable of handling the deployment of such sensors while also coordinating the provisioning of the slice across optically interconnected DCs. To experimentally demonstrate the deployment of a slice with latency sensing we set up a multi-segment testbed connecting client VMs. The presented results demonstrate the behavior of the latency sensor and how it enables latency optimization through path reconfiguration.
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We propose the combination of optical network virtualization and network function virtualization (NFV) for deployment of on-demand OpenFlow-controlled virtual optical networks (VON). Each tenant SDN controller is run on the cloud, so the tenant can control the deployed VON. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed use case and provides implementation details in the ADRENALINE testbed of an NFV orchestrator, which is able to provide multitenancy on top of an heterogeneous transport network by means of network orchestration and virtualization.
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Upcoming 5G mobile networks are addressing ambitious KPIs not just in terms of capacity and latency, but also in terms of network control and management. In this direction, network management schemes need to evolve to provide the required flexibility, and automated and integrated management of 5G networks. This also applies to the 5G-Crosshaul transport network, which provides an integrated fronthaul and backhaul. Software defined networking and NFV are seen as key enablers for that. This article validates the flexibility, scalability, and recovery capabilities of the 5G-Crosshaul architecture in a testbed distributed geographically. More specifically, the central component of the validation is the hierarchical 5G-XCI, conceived to handle multi-domain multi-technology transport network resources. Its performance is characterized through two experimental case studies. The first one illustrates the automated provisioning of all network resources required to deploy a complete LTE virtual mobile network featuring fronthaul and backhaul configurations. This takes 10.467 s on average for the network under test. The second one exploits the flexibility of the hierarchical XCI to apply local or centralized service recovery in the event of link failure depending on the desired path optimality vs. recovery time trade-off. On average, recovery takes 0.299 s and 6.652 s, respectively. Overall, the proposed solution contributes to attaining the target set for 5G networks of reducing service setup from hours to minutes.
Description of network slicing concept”
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