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How Organizations are Talked into Existence Book Review: Czarniawska B. (1997) Narrating the Organization: Dramas of Institutional Identity, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 256 p.

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Czarniawska's book may seem to be quite a challenge for several reasons: the author's trademark "crossing genre boundaries" requires a reader to pay attention and stay confident; the outward simplicity of narrating organizational change stands on sophisticated philosophical, sociological, and philological grounds; and the language is eclectic but brilliantly puts together new empirically grounded and older, well-known theoretical concepts. Czarniawska tells a story of the Swedish public sector's reorganization with the accuracy of an academic and the eloquence of a narrator-institutions become apparent in their activities, as they are based on action, which is depicted by the coined term action nets. In a sense, the reader should be attentive and "follow the words". Though imagination is also a precondition, as the light but solid and convincing narrative constructions are open to further "translation" (in a hermeneutic and actor-network sense). © 2019 National Research University Higher School of Economics. All Rights Reserved.
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