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Corrigendum to “Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants” [Acta Biomater. 69 (2018) 120–130]

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  • UR Advanced Therapeutics Pvt Ltd
Corrigendum
Corrigendum to ‘‘Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in
pro-regenerative corneal implants” [Acta Biomater. 69 (2018) 120–130]
Jaganmohan R. Jangamreddy
a
, Michel K.C. Haagdorens
b,c,1
, M. Mirazul Islam
a,1
, Philip Lewis
d,1
,
Ayan Samanta
a
, Per Fagerholm
a
, Aneta Liszka
a
, Monika K. Ljunggren
a
, Oleksiy Buznyk
a
,
Emilio I. Alarcon
e
, Nadia Zakaria
b,c,
, Keith M. Meek
e,
, May Griffith
a,f,
a
Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden
b
Dept. of Ophthalmology, Antwerp University Hospital, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Antwerp, Belgium
c
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Visual Optics and Visual Rehabilitation, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1,
2610 Antwerp, Belgium
d
Structural Biophysics Group, School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Wales CF24 4HQ, UK
e
Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4W7, Canada
f
Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre and Dept. of Ophthalmology, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H1T 4B3, Canada
The authors regret that an error was published in the original version of Fig. 4. A corrected figure, along with its original caption, is
provided below.
The authors apologize for any confusion or inconvenience caused.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2019.01.046
1742-7061/Ó2019 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
DOI of original article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2018.01.011
Corresponding authors at: Dept. of Ophthalmology, Antwerp University Hospital, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Antwerp, Belgium (N. Zakaria). Maisonneuve-Rosemont
Hospital Research Centre and Dept. of Ophthalmology, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H1T 4B3, Canada (M. Griffith).
E-mail addresses: nadia.zakaria@uantwerpen.be (N. Zakaria), MeekKM@cardiff.ac.uk (K.M. Meek), May.Griffith@umontreal.ca (M. Griffith).
1
Equivalent contributions.
Acta Biomaterialia 88 (2019) 556–557
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journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/actabiomat
Fig. 4. Characterization of regenerated neo-corneas. (a) H&E sections through a healthy, unoperated cornea, and regenerated neo-corneas at 12 months after implantation
with control RHCIII-MPC and CLP-PEG scaffolds. Epithelial hyperplasia was noted in the implanted corneas, which is normal in post-grafting tissues (b). Scale bars, 100 mm.
The regenerated corneal epithelium shows staining with cytokeratin 3/12, a marker of differentiated cells in all three samples. Stromal collagens types III (c) and V (d) are
present in the implanted as well as unoperated corneas, showing in particular that remodeling and extracellular matrix production is occurring in CLP-PEG implants that
contained no collagen. Sub-epithelial nerve plexus stained with b-tubulin (e) showing nerve regeneration in CLP-PEG hydrogels as in control RHCIII-MPC and unoperated
contralateral eyes. Scale bars, 100 mm. At the ultrastructural level, TEM micrographs of all three samples show an epithelium with distinct layers of elongated, cuboidal and
flattened cells, characteristic of healthy corneas (f). Scale bar, 50 mm. TEM images show a regular, lamellar arrangement in both unoperated and regenerated stromas (g). Scale
bar, 20 mm. The CLP-PEG neo-corneas have slightly less regular stromas as seen in 3D reconstructed SBF-SEM images (epithelium rendered in blue) (h) suggesting an on-going
process. Both neo-corneas contained collagen fibrils decorated with proteoglycans (i), similar to the matrix of the healthy, unoperated cornea. Scale bar, 200 nm. (For
interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
J.R. Jangamreddy et al./ Acta Biomaterialia 88 (2019) 556–557 557
Article
In vitro culture of human limbal epithelial stem cells (hLESCs) is crucial to cell therapy in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency, a potentially vision-threatening disease that is characterized by persistent corneal epithelial defects and corneal epithelium conjunctivalization. Traditionally, hLESCs are cultivated based on either limbal tissue explants or single-cell suspensions in culture media containing xenogenous components, such as fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 feeder cells. Plastic culture dishes and human amniotic membranes are classical growth substrates used in conventional hLESC culture systems. The past few decades have witnessed considerable progress and innovations in hLESC culture techniques to ensure a higher level of biosafety and lower immunogenicity for further cell treatment, including complete removal of xenogenous components from culture media, the application of human-derived feeder cells, and the development of novel scaffolds. Three-dimensional artificial niches and three-dimensional culture techniques have also been established to simulate the real microenvironment of limbal crypts for better cell outgrowth and proliferation. All these progresses ensure that in vitro cultured hLESCs are more adaptable to translational stem cell therapy for limbal stem cell deficiency.Graphical abstract
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