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Experimental Investigation of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Sand with Red Soil

Authors:
  • Faculty, Port City International University, Chittagong, Bangladesh

Abstract

An experimental investigation was carried out to study the behavior of concrete by replacing the fine aggregate with locally available red soil. It involves a certain test to find the quality improvement of concrete when red soil is added to it. The partial replacement of sand with red soil was done according to the specific mix proportion to gain good strength in concrete. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and split tensile strength were carried out for red soil mixed concrete and plain concrete to differentiate the strength in it. The chemical properties of red soil and sand have been examined in the BCSIR laboratory and it was found that the properties are almost similar, which indicated that sand can be replaced by red soil. Here, sand was replaced partially by 5%, 10% and 15% red soil. For 5% red soil, the compressive strength and split tensile strength were decreased by 10.44% and 8.78% respectively in 28 days of curing, compared to plain concrete specimen. For 10% red soil, the strengths were decreased in 7 days by 9.9% and 4.16% respectively, but showed almost similar result in 14 and 28 days. Again, for 15% red soil, the strengths were decreased in 28 days by 13.82% and 17.57% respectively. Overall, the compressive strength and split tensile strength were found satisfactory compared to plain concrete specimen for 10% red soil.
... For greater replacement rates, where the usage of a superplasticiser was necessary, the compressive strength decreased by ~8% for a 30% concrete sand replacement, by ~14% for a 60% replacement and by ~19% when the fine aggregate was completely replaced by the heat-treated soil. Based on the available literature [63][64][65][66], these results are considered extraordinary in terms of For greater replacement rates, where the usage of a superplasticiser was necessary, the compressive strength decreased by~8% for a 30% concrete sand replacement, by~14% for a 60% replacement and by~19% when the fine aggregate was completely replaced by the heat-treated soil. Based on the available literature [63][64][65][66], these results are considered extraordinary in terms of maintaining an adequate strength (>40 MPa) of the mortars even at very high replacement percentages. ...
... Based on the available literature [63][64][65][66], these results are considered extraordinary in terms of For greater replacement rates, where the usage of a superplasticiser was necessary, the compressive strength decreased by~8% for a 30% concrete sand replacement, by~14% for a 60% replacement and by~19% when the fine aggregate was completely replaced by the heat-treated soil. Based on the available literature [63][64][65][66], these results are considered extraordinary in terms of maintaining an adequate strength (>40 MPa) of the mortars even at very high replacement percentages. ...
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Australia and many other parts of the world face issues of contamination in groundwater and soils by per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). While the pyrolytic treatment of contaminated soils can destroy PFAS, the resulting heat-treated soils currently have limited applications. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of remediated soils in concrete applications. Using heat-treated soil as a fine aggregate, with a composition and particle size distribution similar to that of traditional concrete sands, proved to be a straightforward process. In such situations, complete fine aggregate replacement could be achieved with minimal loss of compressive strength. At high fine aggregate replacement (≥ 60%), a wetting agent was required for maintaining adequate workability. When using the heat-treated soil as a supplementary cementitious material, the initial mineralogy, the temperature of the heat-treatment and the post-treatment storage (i.e., keeping the soil dry) were found to be key factors. For cement mortars where minimal strength loss is desired, up to 15% of cement can be replaced, but up to 45% replacement can be achieved if moderate strengths are acceptable. This study successfully demonstrates that commercially heat-treated remediated soils can serve as supplementary cementitious materials or to replace fine aggregates in concrete applications.
... The coarse aggregates are used as filler with binding material in concrete production. They are derived from igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks or manufactured from blast furnace slag [17]. Crushed stone with the largest size of 20 mm was used as coarse aggregate in this study. ...
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... The flexural property of concrete was enhanced by partial replacement of sand with 50% of M sand substantially compared to normal mix concrete. Rahman et al. (2019) investigated the compressive and split tensile strength of concrete with partial replacement of sand by red soil. ...
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Aggregates strongly affect the concrete's freshly mixed and hardened properties, mixture proportions, and economy. The utilization of fine aggregates of four local sources such as Sylhet, Rangamati, Rangunia, and Kalurghat on concrete compressive strength is investigated in this paper. Four separate mix designs were conducted targeting 3000 psi concrete for these four sources of fine aggregates. Total 12 concrete cylinders of 4 inches diameter and 8 inches height were cast for compressive strength test by using ordinary Portland cement which was previously tested for specific gravity. For each source of fine aggregates, three cylindrical samples were cast for different curing periods of 7, 14 and 28 days. The cylinders were tested in Universal Testing Machine of 1000 kN capacity against the consecutive curing periods. Overall, the concrete cast with Sylhet sand showed improved compressive strength compared to others. The 28 days compressive strength was found as 2862 psi for concrete cast with Sylhet sand, which was 12.51%, 15.65% and 31.27% more than concrete cast with Rangamati, Rangunia, and Kalurghat sand respectively. The results were then linked against the fineness modulus of the fine aggregates. Concrete compressive strength decreased as the fineness modulus of fine aggregates decreased. INTRODUCTION The standing of using the true quality and types of aggregates on concrete casting cannot be exaggerated. Among the aggregates used in concrete, fine aggregates have a vital impact on concrete strength. Bu et al. (2017) showed the effect on the compressive, flexural and split tensile strength of cement mortars using 4 sand content. By changing the sand content and water/cement ratio, the pore structure of cement mortar was studied. The test results showed that the strength of cement mortar increases with increasing sand content up to an extent. The sand content was found to be an important parameter influencing the pore structure of cement mortar. The relationship between the pore structure and strength of cement mortar was found to be good.
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