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Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies

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My aim is to give a general overview of sources of various information on onomastic studies. Here I argue that onomastic blogs and social network groups may function as an interface between the onomastic community and the public, hence they may be particularly well suited for public outreach and science communication. I will clarify where and how we could be informed about onomastic events and publications, what kind of available sources (web pages, blogs, newsletters, Facebook and Twitter communities, bibliographies, etc.) exist, how they could be used and what kind of developments should be desirable in this field. Working in cooperation with various scientists and new media in pursuit of onomastic information improves the connectivity of onomasticians worldwide. Finally, I will address the issue of the possible onomastic future.
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Evgeny Shokhenmayer
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
1. Introduction
My aim is to give a general overview of sources of various information on
onomastic studies.
I have been editing onomastic blog (e-Onomastics)1 since 2012 providing access
to diverse information resources. By doing so, I have built up my own system
of collecting and offering names-related news concerning onomastic events,
publications, databanks, projects, software, etc. Here I argue that onomastic
blogs and social network groups may function as an interface between the
onomastic community and the public, hence they may be particularly well
suited for public outreach and science communication.
I ask two questions about the roles and value of onomastic media. First, how
do we quantify audience and reach and what factors inuence that reach?
Second, what value does content hold for the community of onomasticians? My
perspective is that of active onomastic content creators and readers. I believe
that engaging with media, either as author or reader, can make signicant
contributions to onomastics and other elds. I also believe that there is an
important niche for onomastic community media, despite the fact that they are
ignored in many treatments of networking. For example, onomastic media are
not mentioned among the Linguistic Blogs on The Linguist List, the essential
guide that recently passed 70,000 followers on social media and circulate
announcements to 30,000 email subscribers. Names-oriented networks are also
not explicitly represented in most scholarly treatments of linguistic media.
I will clarify where and how we could be informed about onomastic events and
publications, what kind of available sources (web pages, blogs, newsletters,
Facebook and Twitter communities, bibliographies etc.) exist, how they could
be used and what kind of developments should be desirable in this eld.
Working in cooperation with various scientists and new media in pursuit of
onomastic information improves the connectivity of onomasticians worldwide.
Finally, I will address the issue of the possible onomastic future.
2. Onomastic Internet resources
In the age of the internet, social media tools offer a powerful way for researchers
to boost their professional prole and act as a public voice for onomastics. I
1 www.e-onomastics.blogspot.com
38 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
aim to prevent my onomastician colleagues from treating online outreach and
scientic research as separate entities.
Below you nd the list of links in alphabetic order related to proper names
studies. The list represents the most popular and signicant academic resources,
but it is far from being exhaustive (see Fig. 1):
Title Address
American Name Society http://www.americannamesociety.org/
Asociación Galega de Onomástica http://ilg.usc.es/agon/
Canadian Society for the Study of Names http://sco.csj.ualberta.ca/
Centre for Adriatic Onomastics Research http://www.unizd.hr/eng/research/
research-centres
Centre of Bulgarian Onomastics „Nikolay
Kovachev“
http://www.uni-vt.bg/bul/?zid=145
Centre for Name Research, Univ. of
Copenhagen
http://names.ku.dk/
Center of Onomastics, Romania http://www.onomasticafelecan.ro/
Deutsche Gesellschaft für
Namenforschung e.V.
http://www.gfn.name/
Dictionary of Medieval Names from
European sources
https://dmnes.wordpress.com/
Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Univ.
of Uppsala
http://www.sprakochfolkminnen.se/
sprak/namn.html
Institute for Name-Studies, Univ. of
Nottingham
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/
research/groups/ins/
International Council of Onomastic
Sciences (ICOS)
https://icosweb.net/drupal/
Namenberatungsstelle an der Universität
Leipzig
http://www.namenberatung.eu/
Names Society of Southern Africa http://namessociety.za.org/
Onomastics (University of Glasgow) http://onomastics.co.uk/
Onomastic research (University of Mainz) http://www.namenforschung.net/
Onomastic School of Donetsk, Ukraine http://azbuka.in.ua/
Onomastika Elkartea / Sociedad Vasca de
Onomástica
https://onomastika.org/
Portal der schweiz. Ortsnamenforschung https://www.ortsnamen.ch/
39
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
Societat d’onomàstica https://www.onomastica.cat/
Société française d’Onomastique https://www.sfo-onomastique.fr/
Society for Name Studies in Britain and
Ireland
http://www.snsbi.org.uk/
Figure 1: Links to websites about proper names and onomastics
3. Onomastics outreach via social media
While there is a burgeoning academic literature on scientic content-sharing
from a communication perspective, I believe this is the rst time practising
onomasticians who blog have analysed their own experience. I argue here that
social media may enhance onomastic networking. It is actually obvious that
the online discussions can lead to tangible, real-world social interactions. It is
deemed necessary for onomasticians to engage with the public online, and during
last years, researchers have seen increasing calls to maintain contacts with both
the non-scientic public and scholars from other disciplines (ranganaThan
2013), especially by means of social media (bik–dovE–GoldstEin –hElm
MacPhErson et al. 2015).
3.1. Theoretical background
Academics value a broad range of scholarly activities, including research,
teaching, academic service and outreach. Among these, the outreach component
of the academic portfolio is gaining increasing attention. Outreach can be
dened in a variety of ways, but most broadly it means communication beyond
the obvious audiences of students and academic peers in sub-disciplines (for
more detailed information about academic forums, paper publications and
resources in the eld of onomastics, see Farkas 2018, this volume). Outreach
can target both scientic audiences and general ones. Outreach is a required
part of life for many academics. Perhaps one of the easiest ways for a scientist
to reach a wider audience quickly is by social networks (saundErs–duFFy
hEard et al. 2017).
Social media have evolved since their origin as an online tool, to become a
popular way to share content and publish comment and opinion. Scientic social
media have become increasingly popular over the past decade, but are still only
undertaken by a small proportion of practising scientists. This may partly reect
uncertainty about what social media are for and how time-investment in social
networking can return benets to scientic careers and to science generally. I
differentiate in particular what I call onomastic community networking and
the more common onomastic communication networking. Briey, onomastic
communication media disseminate names-related information with their
40 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
main target audience being non-specialists and the general public. Onomastic
community media, in contrast, focus on issues about the names’ analysis and
academia, with their main target audience being other name researchers.
Many active and popular media written by linguists and geographers are names-
centered communication media with often numerous followings (e.g. Beliebte
Vornamen,2 Namepedia,3 Toponímia de Lisboa4). Other media are onomastic
community media, intended primarily to be read by other anthroponymists or
toponymists (e.g. Onomastikblog,5 Waternames,6 Arqueotoponimia7). These
often address the linguistic and/or cartographic analysis of proper names,
spread information about posts and funding for early-career scientists, discuss
academic writing and publishing, consider issues of methodology and so on.
There is also overlap between the onomastic communication and onomastic
community categories, with some media addressing both audiences with a
mix of post topics and writing styles (e.g. e-Onomastics,8 Namenforschung,9
Neotoponymie10).
Let us go through the main media resources.
3.2. Onomastic Twitter
The scientists appear to favour more the use of Twitter (collins–shiffmAn
rock 2016). Because Twitter serves as an information lter for many scientists,
publicizing onomastic articles on social media can alert researchers to interesting
studies that they may not have otherwise come across. The online world can
also broaden an onomastician’s impact in the research world. Tweeting from
conferences (discussing research developments, linking to journal articles
or lab websites) can introduce other onomasticians to valuable content, and
consequently provide networking opportunities for users who actively post
during meetings (bik–GoldstEin 2013).
2 https://www.beliebte-vornamen.de/
3 http://www.namepedia.org/
4 https://toponimialisboa.wordpress.com/
5 http://www.onomastikblog.de/
6 https://waternames.wordpress.com/
7 http://arqueotoponimia.blogspot.com/
8 http://e-onomastics.blogspot.com/
9 http://www.namenforschung.net/
10 https://neotopo.hypotheses.org/
41
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
Below you will nd the list of the most famous11 onomastic Twitter channels
based on numbers of tweets in descending order and run by professional
researchers or organisations, which study proper names (see Fig. 2).
Channels’ name
Tweets’
number
(appr.)
Runby(person,country,afliation)
eOnomast 10.600 e-Onomastics (E. Shokhenmayer, Germany,
ICOS)
@Flurnamen 7.400 Peter Löffelad (Germany, Ellwanger Institut für
Sprachforschung)
@EOnomastica 4.250 e-onomastica (Santi Arbós, Spain, Lleida)
@theDMNES 2.900 Dictionary of Medieval Names from European
Sources (United Kingdom)
@namnfragor 2.650 Språk och folkminnen (Sweden, Uppsala)
@place_names 1.450 Institute for Name-studies (UK, Nottingham)
@AmNameSociety 1.100 American Name Society (USA)
@waternames 950 Flood and Flow Project (UK, Leicester)
@Namenberatung 750 Namenberatungsstelle (D. Kremer, Germany,
Leipzig)
@ICOSnews 650 International Council of Onomastic Sciences
@GhanaPlaceNames 600 Ghana Place Names Society (John Turl, UK)
@OnomaMainz 500 Namenforschung (R. Heuser, Germany, Mainz)
@DFDmainz 400 Digitales Familiennamenwörterbuch (Germany,
Mainz/Darmstadt)
@ToponimiaVila 400 Toponímia de Vilafranca del Penedès (Lluís
Tetas Palau, Spain)
@NameStudies 350 Institute for Name-Studies (UK, Nottingham)
@namenforschung 350 Deutsche Gesellschaft für Namenforschung e.V.
(D. Kremer, Germany, Leipzig)
@StaffsPNProject 200 Staffordshire Place-Names Project (UK,
Nottingham)
Figure 2: List of the most famous onomastic Twitter channels run by
professionals
3.3. Onomastic blogs
Along with forging links between onomasticians, online interactions have the
potential to enhance “broader impacts” by improving communication between
11 By the middle of 2018.
42 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
name researchers and the general public. One of the modern kind of online
communication and information transfer is blogging. Majority of scientists are
now using blogs for writing, reading or as a lab notebook. Before starting any
blog, it is however useful to think about who should be reached with the writing
– be it potential collaborators, potential employers, or people on the street.
Onomastic blogs could be an important outlet to contribute informed opinions
to linguistic, historical or social debates and develop a collective presence in
the blogosphere, thereby increasing its inherent credibility. The internet can be
a more powerful force than traditional channels – when content goes “viral”,
the reach can be truly global.
I admit, as A. GoldstEin noted, that blogs might not be the best type of source
for systematic and authoritative information (GoldstEin 2009: 553). kouPEr
agrees, noting that, “this way, the news becomes more entertaining, thereby
making it difcult to rely on this form of reporting as a source of accurate
information” (kouPEr 2010). For onomastic bloggers, this personal expression
illustrates science engagement more than objective authoritative information.
Many names-related blogs have different categories in which they classify their
posts: anthroponyms, toponyms, hydronyms, zoonyms, astronyms, etc. Some
can be about topics that are more personal and others on more research-oriented
themes: PhD, postdoc, laboratory, department or section subjects.
Below you nd the list of examples of names-related blogs in alphabetic order
still kept up-to-date in corresponding languages:
Blogs’ names Topic Language(s)
http://arqueotoponimia.blogspot.com/ Paleotoponymy Spanish
https://blog.namsor.com/ NamSor Software English/
French
http://www.cornishonomastics.net/ Cornish Onomastics English
https://igorinternational.com/blog/ Naming Agency English
http://imja.name/ Russian onomastics Russian
http://namesaremygame.blogspot.com/ Names in literature English
http://namenerds.blogspot.com/ Names in general English
http://neotopo.hypotheses.org/ Political toponymy French
http://nomesportugueses.blogspot.pt/ Portuguese
anthroponyms
Portuguese
http://nothinglikeaname.blogspot.com/ Anthroponyms English
https://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Blog Nordic Names English
http://onomasticetymology.tumblr.com Etymology of Names English
43
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
https://onomastika.org/ Basque onomastics Basque/
Spanish
http://politicalstrangenames.blogspot.com/ Political names English
http://www.theartofnaming.com/ Name-giving English
http://thebeautyofnames.blogspot.com/ Names in the arts English
https://toponymio.wordpress.com/ Bulgarian toponymy Bulgarian
https://www.vernoeming.nl/ Dutch forenames Dutch
http://vousvoyezletopo.blog.lemonde.fr/ French place-names French
Figure 3: List of examples of the onomastic blogs run by
professionals
3.4. Onomastic Facebook
This is the evident fact that an increasing proportion of the public get their news
through social media, especially through Facebook. A new political and cultural
climate, in which the dissemination of “fake news” and “alternate facts” on
Facebook rose considerably, has not touched on the onomastics yet. Besides
that, Facebook represents a very promising outreach platform if you consider
how many persons use it: as of the third quarter of 2017, Facebook had 2.07
billion monthly active users or more than a quarter of the world’s population
(Statista 2017).12
The main important advantage is the networks that individuals form on the
platform: a medial adult user connects with 338 friends. Although the numbers
of likes, shares and comments may not be considered as the productive metrics
to estimate impact of scientic posts, they may show tendencies to new
perspectives. Onomasticians should note that while Facebook usage is high in
both total numbers and frequency of usage, many users only passively consume
rather than actively participate in discourse (McClain 2017). Facebook, in
terms of awareness, only falls behind research proling sites such as Google
Scholar, ResearchGate, and LinkedIn for scientists and engineers (Van
noordEn 2014).
Despite the fact that groups/communities and pages have major differences
from a communicative perspective, below you nd the top 20 list of onomastic
Facebook groups, communities or pages put together in descending order of
members, followers or friends (data as of July 2018).
12 https://www.statista.com/
44 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
Name of FB Groups, Communities etc. Statistics Language
Toponomastica femminile 9.870 members Italian
Prof. Udolph - Zentrum für
Namenforschung
5.683 followers German
Surname distribution maps 3.187 members English
Celtic Surnames and Place-names 1.615 members English
Харківська топонімічна група 1.455 members Ukrainian
Toponimia de Galicia 1.352 followers Galician/Spanish
Welsh Place-Name Society 899 followers Welsh/English
Namenkundliches Zentrum der U. Leipzig 850 followers German
Scottish Place-names 441 members English
Deutsche Gesellschaft f. Namenforschung 399 followers German
International Council of Onomastic Sciences 321 followers Multilingual
English Place-names 298 members English
Institute for Name-Studies 283 followers English
American Name Society 245 followers English
Център по българска ономастика 220 friends Bulgarian
Onomástica galega e Lusófona em geral 188 members Portuguese
Digital Exposure of English Place-Names 179 followers English
Voprosy onomastiki / Problems of
onomastics
142 followers Russian
Ономастика Поволжья: взгляд молодых 119 members Russian
Onomastics 113 members English
Figure 4: List of onomastic Facebook groups, communities or pages
3.4. Academic social network sites
The term academic social network is used as a general term referring to
online services, tools or platforms, which can help scientists to build their
professional networking with other researchers and facilitate their activities
while researching. This is about networks focused on shared research interests.
Some well-known examples of the academic social network sites (ASNSs)
include Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Google Scholar, Mendeley and Zotero.
Most of them provide a platform that allows professionals to create proles
with academic properties, upload their publications and/or create online groups.
Those websites contribute in maintaining records of actual research tendencies,
as well as in fostering relationships between the researchers.
Below I will provide a brief overview how the onomastic sciences look like on
those academic social network sites.
45
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
3.4.1. Academia.edu
Academia.edu is an academic social networking website that allows users to
create a personal prole, upload papers, request feedback, follow researchers,
send personal messages to other researchers and view analytics on your papers.
Users on Academia.edu can also import contacts from Facebook, Twitter,
Yahoo and Google to nd colleagues who already have Academia.edu proles,
thus connecting many different networking tools described.
In what way can we weigh onomastics among other research interests? According
to the statistics,13 over 64 million academics have signed up to Academia.edu,
adding 21 million papers. If we admit that all 5.641 scholars who have chosen
Onomastics as their research interest, do equally join Linguistics (what is not
always the case, of course), which count 218.276 followers, then it still only
represents around 2,6% of the linguistics-interested researchers. From the
whole number of academics, it will be not more than 0.009%. As for papers,
2.330 works assigned to onomastics from 21 million consist about 0.011% but
they represent 3,44% from 67.739 manuscripts with Linguistics tag. It is even
less relevant to quantify the amount of Toponymy research interest with 5.096
followers and 1.609 uploaded papers because of its highly interdisciplinary
character. The most “attractive” names-related research interests on Academia.
edu are listed below.
Followers Research interests
5.641 Onomastics
5.096 Toponymy
3.144 Place names
2.046 Toponomastics
1.050 Toponimia
929 Toponomastica
677 Naming
411 Roman onomastics
284 Literary onomastics
249 Onomástica
166 Onomastique
112 Anthroponyms
Figure 5: List of onomastic research interests on Academia.edu with
corresponding numbers of their followers
13 https://www.academia.edu/about Academia.edu. (Retrieved: 2018.07.19.)
46 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
3.4.2. ResearchGate
ResearchGate is a similar resource with over 15 million veried scientists14
that gives the option to upload journal articles, conference papers, posters, data
and code to an online repository. ResearchGate users also receive analytics on
their publications including the number of times their papers have been read
and cited by other users on ResearchGate. Additionally, the platform allows
researchers to create project logs that can be used to update peers on current
projects, attract potential co-authors or request submissions for journal special
issues.
Unfortunately, due to the system of the continuous scrolling effect and innite
loading webpage, it turns to be impossible to calculate the total number of
publications dedicated to onomastics and authors working on it.
3.4.3. Google Scholar
Google Scholar provides a search engine that can be used to identify hyperlinks
to articles that are publically available or may be obtained through institutional
libraries. Users who choose to create a personal Google Scholar prole can
access their citations per year metrics. Articles uploaded on ResearchGate,
Academia.edu or other databases can also be linked to Google Scholar prole
so that readers can nd hyperlinks to all of the work.
Taking into consideration the fundamental specicity and difference of this
platform, it is nothing to be surprised about 21.300 articles found for onomastics
or 15.800 for toponymy.
There is no contradicting that technological progress has changed the way
we make connections and access information. Face-to-face interaction is still
crucial, but social networking has “changed the rules of the game”. Platforms
such as ResearchGate, Academia.edu, Google Scholar, Twitter and Facebook
can be utilized to create a personal brand, disseminate scientic ndings and
connect with researchers worldwide.
3.4.4. Zotero
Zotero functions primarily as a research tool, allowing users to collect, save,
cite and share materials from a wide range of sources. The site also maintains
a signicant community of academics who can connect through groups and
forums, or through their search engine. Each Zotero user can build a personal
prole complete with CVs and other detailed information.
14 https://solutions.researchgate.net/recruiting/ResearchGate. (Retrieved: 2018.07.19.)
47
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
Zotero also allows creating groups, where researchers can collaborate remotely
with project members and set up web-based bibliographies for classes they
teach. For example, the International Council of Onomastic Sciences set up
there its onomastic library run by the International Bibliography of Onomastic
Sciences Group for adding recently published works.
4. Future of onomastic media
To the end, I would like to discuss a possible evolution of the onomastic sciences
without concluding because to foretell the times to come is thankless task.
However, in the future, in order to get onomastic news online, it would be useful
to develop: 1. News aggregation website that provides and updates information
from different sources in systematized way on a chosen topic (a name-related
news aggregator can give another way to parse news from multiple trusted
sources into a single, streamlined “newspaper”). 2. Web-based feed readers that
allow users to nd a web feed on the internet and add it to their feed reader.
3. Feed reader applications that can be installed on a PC, smartphone or tablet
computer and designed to collect news and interest feed subscriptions and
group them together using a user-friendly interface.
Ideally, I would even dare to dream of an online platform for all onomasticians,
sort of ResearchGate (or Academia.edu). It could become a key venue for
scholars wanting to engage in collaborative discussion, for peer review papers,
for sharing questionable results that might never otherwise be published and for
uploading raw data sets.
That could be a tool that onomasticians would be using to raise their proles and
become more discoverable. Such a platform would allow to maintain proles,
boost professional presence online and post content related to work. It would
also enable to discover related peers, augment track metrics, nd recommended
research papers, follow discussions on research-related issues or comment on
research that is relevant to one’s eld.
Furthermore, that platform, being actually an Onomastic Social Network, could
allow researchers to download journal articles from a variety of sources and
create a personal library to share within a private group (similar to Quora,
LabRoots and the science groups of LinkedIn). Name researchers could
discuss, annotate and benet from the free ow of ideas between like-minded
colleagues at research facilities around the world regardless of afliation, all of
which drives citation and usage, which are a vital metric in research.
48 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
4.1.Willtraditionalonomasticjournalsdisappear?
In a time of huge digital change and virtual uncertainty, we need to think about
the future of traditional onomastic paper journals. Has the traditional format of
the onomastic journal had its day?
Taking into consideration how almost all scientic journals are trending, I
predict the development of names-related activities focused on realizing the
ideals of open science (OS) and particularly open access (OA) and open data
(OD). Let us recall that open access publishing and post-publication peer
review are becoming more common. The journals would adopt a web-based
platform run by onomasticians themselves. This is what already happens with
the arXiv for the physical sciences and bioRxiv for biological sciences.
Moreover, we should turn our attention to the Research Data Alliance (RDA), a
community-driven organization launched in 2013 by the European Commission
with the goal of building the social and technical infrastructure to enable
open sharing of data. With more than to 6,300 members from 132 countries
(November 2017), RDA provides a neutral space where its members can come
together through focused global Working and Interest Groups to develop and
adopt infrastructure that promotes data-sharing and data-driven research.15
The Linguistics Data Interest Group (LDIG) became an endorsed RDA
Interest Group in July 2017, with the aim of facilitating the development of
reproducible research in linguistics. The LDIG is for data at all linguistic levels,
including proper nouns from all of the world’s languages. The Group plans to
develop the discipline-wide adoption of common standards for data citation and
attribution. The LDIG also aims to improve education and outreach efforts to
make linguists more aware of the principles of reproducible research and the
value of data creation methodology, curation, management, sharing, citation
and attribution.16
5. Looking ahead to onomastics’ interdisciplinary future
Increasingly, onomastic research is moving towards more interdisciplinary
endeavours. I agree that the current models of science differ from the way
in which sciences were previously understood, primarily in their complexity
(krŠko 2013: 289). Any science conducted in isolation without collaboration
between related scientic disciplines is doomed to stagnation. Therefore,
onomastics is, more or less, seen as an integral to interdisciplinary comparative
15 Research Data Alliance (2017) “Who is RDA?”. Web Page. https://www.rd-alliance.org/
about-rda/who-rda.html (Accessed: 2018.01.01.)
16 Research Data Alliance (2017) “RDA and Linguistics”. Web Page. https://www.rd-alliance.
org/rda-disciplines/rda-and-linguistics (Accessed: 2018.01.01.)
49
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
studies conducted within other sciences. The onomastics uses knowledge
from other disciplines to shape its academic hypotheses and conclusions, and
thus is also part of these disciplines. Onomastics, although an autonomous
discipline, overlaps the subject matter of many other disciplines since name
use is central to human activity (AlGEo–AlGEo 2000: 265). The interaction
between research projects and the development of joint research teams are very
promising. Many of the problems, with which onomastics research engages,
can only be comprehensively explained from an interdisciplinary point of view,
since it concerns issues that are the subject of research by several of various
sciences (see Fig. 6).
Figure 6: Interdisciplinarity of onomastics
The onomatometric analysis of China’s scientic power may serve as an
example of the interdisciplinary approach (cArsEnAt–shokhEnmAyEr 2016).
This project involves the analysis of about one million medical research articles
from PubMed. The researchers proposed to evaluate the correlation between
the onomastic class of the article authors and that of the citation authors. They
clearly demonstrated that the cultural bias exists and that it evolves in time.
By doing so, they proved that onomastics provides a reliable estimation of the
cultural bias of a research community.
5.1. Future of onomastics
Returning to the notion of technological advances, there are a number of
major breakthroughs likely to happen in the coming 50 years that will change
50 Evgeny Shokhenmayer
onomastics signicantly. These breakthroughs may be: 1. Advanced AI: it will
certainly put a damper on theoretical onomastics and its efforts to contribute
to models of language and names processing; 2. Neuron- or neuronal-cluster
level brain simulations and measurement. The future hopefully holds a detailed
description of how name is processed and produced in healthy and dysfunctional
brains involving what each neuron or neuronal cluster is doing.
Aside from those technologically-driven advances, there are also some
evergreen tasks that onomasticians will likely always be working on: 1. Names
documentation and revitalization: we are so far behind on this (~15% of the
World’s languages) that it is hard to imagine a time when there won’t be work
to do in documenting languages and names therein. 2. Socio-onomastics:
presumably new models of social interaction and transmission will inform
sociolinguistic theories, but the collection and interpretation of names will
always be required. Besides that, new names are constantly arising. 3. Forensic
onomastics: onomastic research within criminal investigation. 4. Internet
onomastics: usernames, netizens’ nicknames, identity creation and space of
freedom, virtual onomastics, digital names research.
References
AlGEo, John–AlGEo, kAtiE 2000. Onomastics as an Interdisciplinary Study.
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51
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies
kouPEr, innA 2010. Science Blogs and public engagement with science:
practices, challenges, and opportunities. Journal of Science Communication
9/1.
krŠko, JAromír 2013. Linguistic and cultural dimensions of Slovak onomastics
in Slavistics research. Human Affairs 23/2: 289–294.
URL: https://doi.org/10.2478/s13374-013-0126-4
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American: Guest Blog [Internet]. New York, Springer Nature. URL: https://
blogs.scienticamerican.com/guest-blog/scientists-do-outreach-or-your-
science-dies/
sAundErs, mAnu–duffy, mEGhAn–hEArd, stEPhEn–kosmAlA,
mArGArEt–lEAthEr, simon–mcGlynn, tErrEncE–ollErton, JEff
PArAchnowitsch, Amy 2017. Bringing ecology blogging into the scientic
fold: measuring reach and impact of science community blogs. Royal Society
Open Science 4/10: 170957. DOI:10.1098/rsos.170957.
vAn noordEn, richard 2014. Online collaboration: Scientist and the social
network. Nature 512: 126–129. pmid:25119221.
Abstract
My aim is to give a general overview of sources of various information on
onomastic studies. Here I argue that onomastic blogs and social network
groups may function as an interface between the onomastic community and
the public, hence they may be particularly well suited for public outreach and
science communication. I will clarify where and how we could be informed
about onomastic events and publications, what kind of available sources (web
pages, blogs, newsletters, Facebook and Twitter communities, bibliographies,
etc.) exist, how they could be used and what kind of developments should
be desirable in this eld. Working in cooperation with various scientists and
new media in pursuit of onomastic information improves the connectivity
of onomasticians worldwide. Finally, I will address the issue of the possible
onomastic future.
Keywords: onomastic studies, names-based blogging, onomastic resources
... It is a science to which several fields must converge to make an exact interpretation of it. In this To close this brief quotation section, we quote a recent work of Evgeny Shokhenmayer (2017). In this paper, the author analyses the behavior of onomastic research, using georeferenced search mechanisms in academic websites as Academia.edu ...
Article
The editors’ target is much more than introducing the papers of this thematic issue to the reader. It can be considered a space devoted to discussing the Onomastics studies in Brazil, its status, and interdisciplinarity. Initially, we outline a tenuous sketch about interdisciplinarity and onomastic research in Brazil. We also discuss the terminological disagreements among researchers, in general, and among authors for this thematic issue, specifically – not a welcome scenario. Secondly, we revise the concepts related to interdisciplinarity, as multidisciplinarity, pluridisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. In this review, we emphasize its application in onomastic studies in Brazil by presenting attempts to implement inter (or trans) disciplinary routines in research, quoting French and Canadian onomasticians. Finally, the last section introduces to the reader the papers that make up the thematic issue, inviting him to read the whole volume and to reflect on the discussed themes.
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Este trabajo indaga en las diversas fuentes que pueden servir de punto de partida para el estudio de los procesos antroponomásticos. Examinamos dos tipos de recursos para este tipo de investigaciones. Por una parte, podemos acceder a repertorios más o menos establecidos, como es el caso de la base de datos proporcionada por instituciones públicas en diferentes países (censos, padrones, organismos de carácter estadístico, entre otros), cuyo objetivo como servicio público es de carácter abierto y plurifuncional. Por otra parte, este elenco puede complementarse con otras compilaciones de muy diverso origen y cometido que pueden emplearse de manera subsidiaria. Se trata de corpus elaborados mayoritariamente por el propio investigador en onomástica, que recurre a herramientas como entrevistas, encuestas u otros mecanismos a partir de los cuales pueden establecerse catálogos onomásticos, así como hacer acopio de otra información relevante en los procesos que se suceden para determinar el impacto de determinados parámetros en los procesos de atribución, concretamente en la que afecta a los nombres de persona.
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This paper investigates the various sources that can serve as a starting point for the study of anthroponomastic processes. We examine two types of resources for this kind of research. On the one hand, we can access more or less established repertoires, as is the case of the database provided by public institutions in different countries (censuses, registers, statistical agencies, among others), whose purpose as a public service is open and multifunctional. On the other hand, this list can be complemented by other compilations of very different origin and purpose that can be used in a subsidiary manner. These corpora are mostly compiled by the onomastics researcher himself, who uses tools such as interviews, surveys or other mechanisms from which onomastic catalogues can be established, as well as gathering other relevant information in the processes that take place to determine the impact of certain parameters in the attribution processes, specifically in that which affects personal names.
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В статье описаны современные электронные ресурсы как инструменты для топонимических исследований. До недавних пор использование геоинформационных систем (ГИС) в исследованиях географических названий нельзя было назвать масштабным. С развитием современных информационных технологий топонимические ис- следования приобрели новый характер, отличающийся новейшими подходами к сбору и обработке геоданных. Цель статьи – выявить, проанализировать и описать современные электронные средства для сбора и изучения топонимов с целью дальнейшего использования подобных ресурсов в разного рода исследованиях. Материал и методы. Наборы топонимов стали центральным компонентом систем GPS-навигации и онлайн-карт, которые сегодня широко используются в научных исследованиях. Массовая информатизация, развитие высокоскоростного интернета, доступность приобретения и использования портативных компьютеров и мобильных устройств, повышение компьютерной грамотности населения охватывают большинство стран мира, что отражается на качественно новых подходах к изучению топонимической лексики. Революция цифрового картографирования и мобильных приложений позволяет простым гражданам вносить свой вклад в обработку топонимического материала в режиме онлайн. С появлением электронных систем Google Maps, Apple Maps, Яндекс.Карты, Bing Maps и им подобных топонимические исследования приобрели новый характер. Изыскания на уровне микротопонимии стали четче и подробнее. Наглядно показано, как можно использовать онлайн-топонимические словари, электронные карты, наукометрические базы данных, географическую базу данных GeoNames и Google-переводчик для проведения топонимических исследований. Указываются преимущества и недостатки современных сайтов и программ, ориентированных на исследования в области топонимики. Делаются выводы о целесообразности привлечения технических средств к топонимическим исследованиям в целом. Научные онлайн-дискуссии на таких площадках, как ResearchGate и Facebook, приводят к реальному взаимодействию ученых и помогают сделать научную мысль глубже, четче и ярче. Принимая во внимание всевозможные погрешности вследствие применения современных описанных технологий, считаем необходимым контроль в виде сверки данных, например по этимологии географических имен и т. п. Упомянутые инструменты позиционируются как чрезвычайно полезные для выявления, описания, изучения, комплексного анализа и систематизации топонимического материала.
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Arguably, the dissemination of science communication has recently entered a new age in which science must compete for public attention with fake news, alternate facts, and pseudoscience. This clash is particularly evident on social media. Facebook has taken a prime role in disseminating fake news, alternate facts, and pseudoscience, but is often ignored in the context of science outreach, especially among individual scientists. Based on new survey data, scientists appear in large Facebook networks but seldom post information about general science, their own scientific research, or culturally controversial topics in science. The typical individual scientist’s audience is large and personally connected, potentially leading to both a broad and deep engagement in science. Moreover, this media values individual expertise, allowing scientists to serve as a “Nerd of Trust” for their online friend and family networks. Science outreach via social media demands a renewed interest, and Facebook may be an overlooked high-return, low-risk science outreach tool in which scientists can play a valuable role to combat disinformation.
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Social media has created networked communication channels that facilitate interactions and allow information to proliferate within professional academic communities as well as in informal social circumstances. A significant contemporary discussion in the field of science communication is how scientists are using (or might use) social media to communicate their research. This includes the role of social media in facilitating the exchange of knowledge internally within and among scientific communities, as well as externally for outreach to engage the public. This study investigates how a surveyed sample of 587 scientists from a variety of academic disciplines, but predominantly the academic life sciences, use social media to communicate internally and externally. Our results demonstrate that while social media usage has yet to be widely adopted, scientists in a variety of disciplines use these platforms to exchange scientific knowledge, generally via either Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or blogs. Despite the low frequency of use, our work evidences that scientists perceive numerous potential advantages to using social media in the workplace. Our data provides a baseline from which to assess future trends in social media use within the science academy.
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Onomastics, although an autonomous discipline, overlaps the subject matter of many other disciplines since name use is central to human activity. In its subfield of terminologies or nomenclatures; moreover, onomastics relates to every discipline, subject field, and activity that human beings pursue: We are a species that categorizes and labels. To illustrate this point, we consider briefly the interconnections of onomastics with a number of other disciplines and then look more particularly at the role of placename study as a cross-disciplinary activity.
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Full-text available
Online social media tools can be some of the most rewarding and informative resources for scientists-IF you know how to use them.
Onomastics to measure Cultural Bias in medical research
  • Rick Alistair-Goldstein
bik, holly-dovE, AlistAir-GoldstEin, miriAm-hElm, rEbEccA-mAcPhErson, rick et al. 2015. Ten simple rules for Effective Online Outreach. PLoS Comput Biol 11/4: e1003906. UrL: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003906 pmid:25879439 cArsEnAt, EliAn-shokhEnmAyEr, EvGEny 2016. Onomastics to measure Cultural Bias in medical research. In: houGh, cArolE-izdEbskA, dAriA eds. Names and Their Environment. Proceedings of the 25th International Congress of Onomastic Sciences, Glasgow, 25-29 August 2014. Glasgow, University of Glasgow. 4: 208-220.
How are scientists using social media in the workplace? PLoS ONE 11: e0162680. pmid:27732598 fArkAs, tAmás 2018
  • Jenny Collins
collins, kimbErlEy-shiffmAn, dAvid-rock, JEnny 2016. How are scientists using social media in the workplace? PLoS ONE 11: e0162680. pmid:27732598 fArkAs, tAmás 2018. Our Onomastics Today: an International Overview. Onomastica Uralica 14: 5-14.
  • Adam Goldstein
GoldstEin, adam 2009. Blogging Evolution. Evolution: Education and Outreach 2/3: 548-559.
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies kouPEr, innA 2010. science Blogs and public engagement with science: practices, challenges, and opportunities
Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies kouPEr, innA 2010. science Blogs and public engagement with science: practices, challenges, and opportunities. Journal of Science Communication 9/1. krŠko, JAromír 2013. Linguistic and cultural dimensions of slovak onomastics in slavistics research. Human Affairs 23/2: 289-294. UrL: https://doi.org/10.2478/s13374-013-0126-4
UrL: https:// blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/scientists-do-outreach-or-yourscience-dies/ sAundErs, mAnu-duffy, mEGhAn-hEArd, stEPhEn-kosmAlA, mArGArEt-lEAthEr, simon-mcGlynn, tErrEncE-ollErton
  • Jai Ranganathan
ranganaThan, jai 2013. scientists: Do outreach or your science dies. Scientific American: Guest Blog [Internet]. new york, springer nature. UrL: https:// blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/scientists-do-outreach-or-yourscience-dies/ sAundErs, mAnu-duffy, mEGhAn-hEArd, stEPhEn-kosmAlA, mArGArEt-lEAthEr, simon-mcGlynn, tErrEncE-ollErton, JEff-PArAchnowitsch, Amy 2017. Bringing ecology blogging into the scientific fold: measuring reach and impact of science community blogs. Royal Society Open Science 4/10: 170957. DOI:10.1098/rsos.170957. vAn noordEn, richard 2014. Online collaboration: scientist and the social network. Nature 512: 126-129. pmid:25119221.
Our Onomastics Today: an International Overview
fArkAs, tAmás 2018. Our Onomastics Today: an International Overview. Onomastica Uralica 14: 5-14.