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Hull: Culture, History, Place

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Abstract

110,000 word edited collection Paperback £14.95; Hardback £35 https://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/books/isbn/9781781384190/ Description: From its earliest origins to the twenty-first century, Hull is a city that has been continually shaped by flows of people, commodities, ideas and trade. The result is a distinctive city with a longstanding, varied, proud and often remarkable history. Hull: Culture, History, Place is a celebration of this unique city's past and present. Telling the story of Hull from the earliest settlement on the muddy banks of the river, through civil war rebellion, maritime success and the trauma of the Second World War to postwar resilience and recovery, this book shows how and why Hull has been a place of significance and success over many centuries. The eleven chapters, twenty-five enlightening vignettes and many illustrations bring the city's history to light and life, exploring the people, places, trade, industry, ideas, creativity and vision that have formed the lived experience of this city for over eight hundred years.
Hull: Culture, History, Place
By D. J. Starkey, D. Atkinson, B. McDonagh, S. McKeon and E. Salter (eds)
(Liverpool University Press, 2017)
110,000 word edited collection
Paperback £14.95; Hardback £35
https://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/books/isbn/9781781384190/
Description
From its earliest origins to the twenty-first century, Hull is a city that has been continually
shaped by flows of people, commodities, ideas and trade. The result is a distinctive city with a
longstanding, varied, proud and often remarkable history. Hull: Culture, History, Place is a
celebration of this unique city’s past and present. Telling the story of Hull from the earliest
settlement on the muddy banks of the river, through civil war rebellion, maritime success and
the trauma of the Second World War to post-war resilience and recovery, this book shows how
and why Hull has been a place of significance and success over many centuries. The eleven
chapters, twenty-five enlightening vignettes and many illustrations bring the city’s history to
light and life, exploring the people, places, trade, industry, ideas, creativity and vision that have
formed the lived experience of this city for over eight hundred years.
Reviews
'It is a genuine collaborative effort that has been beautifully put together to give a real feel for
the culture and history of a very distinctive place. The book is enhanced still further by the
efforts of the publisher, since high-quality paper enhances the scores of full-colour illustrations.
It is a book largely written by academics from the University of Hull but the text is extremely
readable and will do much to enhance the pride of citizens in their history while educating
visitors about the unique character of the city.'
Terry R. Slater, Journal of Historical Geography
'This is a genuine collaborative effort that has been beautifully put together to give a real feel
for the culture and history of a very distinctive place. The book is enhanced still further by the
efforts of the publisher, since high-quality paper enhances the scores of full-colour
illustrations.'
Journal of Historical Geography
'as much an exemplary work of ‘public history’ as an academic synthesis.'
The Economic History Review
'This book is highly recommended as a demonstration in how to write and produce an
enthralling local history of a major east coast port.'
North East History
'Hull: Culture, History, Place presents a fascinating insight into the distinctiveness of this
important maritime city fromits prehistoric origins up to the twenty-first century. ... this
collection of essays offers the reader an absorbing snapshot of the city’s rich heritage.
Moreover, the many interesting vignettes 25 in total located within each chapter add further
illuminating detail. Scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including cultural geography,
history, and literary studies, deploy a diverse array of source materials, including diaries, letters,
inventories, wills and testaments, and oral testimonies, to demonstrate how important the city
of Hull was not just to British, but global history.'
Robert James, The International Journal of Maritime History
About the Authors
David J Starkey is Professor of Maritime History and Director of the Maritime Historical
Studies Centre at the University of Hull.
David Atkinson is Professor of Cultural and Historical Geography at the University of Hull.
Briony McDonagh is Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Hull.
Sarah McKeon is Research Assistant at the University of Hull.
Elisabeth Salter is Professor of Medieval Studies and Cultural Creativity at the University of
Hull.
Article
As working-class female academics, this paper examines the constructions of our identities focusing on both what unites and differentiates us as working-class women. We focus on the structuring forces in our lives such as our class, our whiteness and our gender, but we also discuss how our experiences have been shaped by space and place as a complex set of time-sensitive inter-relationships involving domination and subordination. Here, our different stories of where, when and how we grew up are discussed as we attempt to make sense of these in relation to our construction of class and its intersectionality with these important aspects of our lives. We examine how these shaping features of our identities influence the personal investment we place in our work and how the middle-class ‘status’ inferred upon us by our educational ‘success’ and engagement within academia almost always feels contradictory to our own subjectivities and working-class loyalties.
Article
Full-text available
Responding to calls for scholars to address ‘material worlds’ in our analyses of protests past, the paper examines the more-than-human historical geographies of enclosure and enclosure protest in sixteenth-century England. It argues that negotiating enclosure – in the sense of both promoting and resisting private property rights – was dependent on particular assemblages of people, animals and things and their convergence within specific spaces and temporalities. Particular attention is paid to mundane and everyday objects entangled in enclosure protest and the ways these assemblages might transform objects’ meanings, rendering them threatening or disobedient. Moreover, repurposing these things offered opportunities to re-make space, concretizing or resisting particular claims to access or possession at the local level. It contributed too to the ongoing debate out of which new concepts of property eventually emerged, so that interrogating the materialities of enclosure protest offers vital space in which to rethink the makings of our modern world.
is Professor of Maritime History and Director of the Maritime Historical Studies Centre at the University of Hull
  • J David
  • Starkey
David J Starkey is Professor of Maritime History and Director of the Maritime Historical Studies Centre at the University of Hull.