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Polypropylene (PP) is one of the recyclability and ease processed thermoplastics and it expected used as the cable insulation material to reply the unrecoverable material crosslinked polyethylene(XLPE). However, isotactic polypropylene which is too stiff and has a lower electrical character cannot be directly used into the high voltage cable insulation system. In this paper, a number of polymers have been blended with polypropylene to improve the properties of the PP blend samples. Electrical and mechanical experiments of the modifying PP blends will also be done. Based on the experimental results, blends of PP and propylene-ethylene copolymers (PEC) are potentially more suitable for modifying PP.
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... Different insulation materials are used according to the area and place of use of the cable. PP and HDPE are one of them [17,18]. These materials are not used directly in the cable insulation system because of their low thermal and mechanical strength. ...
... These materials are not used directly in the cable insulation system because of their low thermal and mechanical strength. For this reason, PP and HDPE are blended with different materials to improve their thermal and mechanical properties [18]. In this study, thermal and structural properties of PP and HDPE blended with different ratios of WUF (0-30 wt%) were investigated, and it was aimed to develop these properties with low cost. ...
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Polypropylene (PP) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) are the recyclable and easily processed thermoplastics which are commonly used as cable insulation materials. The improvement of thermal and structural properties of PP and HDPE is very important for aging processes. For this purpose, powdered waste urea–formaldehyde was added to PP and HDPE at 5 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 30 wt% ratios. The thermal, structural and morphological properties of the produced samples were observed by using thermogravimetric differential thermal analyser, oxygen induction time tests, fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy. By the results of the relevant study, the thermal and oxidative stability of the composites was improved by the incorporation of WUF into the polymer matrices. In conclusion, powdered urea–formaldehyde can be a cost-effective and good filler for PP and HDPE.
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