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Shows effectiveness of waxing formulations to extend the shelf life of mango fruit
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Effect of Different Waxing Technologies on Shelf Life of
Mango Fruits Stored under Different Storage Conditions
University of Nairobi
To evaluate eectiveness of various waxing technologies to preserve
postharvest quality and extend the shelf life of mango fruit
‘Apple’ mango fruits at mature green stage were obtained from Machakos
County. Mango wax was provided by UPL Ltd while Shellac wax was prepared
in the University laboratory.
Wax was applied by dipping the fruits in a bowl with wax and allowed to dry
on wire shelves. After drying fruits were packed in open boxes and stored in
ambient (25ºC) and cold storage (12ºC).
Eect of the treatment was determined by measuring ripening attributes
such as water loss, respiration and peel rmness after every 3 days in ambient
and 7 days in cold storage.
Completely randomized design with a factorial arrangement with three
replication was used as the study design.
Cumulative weight loss of the waxed fruits was signicantly (p<0.05)lower
compared to the untreated control fruits.
Waxing suppressed respiration signicantly (p<0.05) when compared to
the untreated control fruits.
Waxing retained fruit’s rmness longer compared to untreated control.
Wax signicantly (p<0.05) retained higher beta carotene content, Vitamin
C, TTA and ºbrix throughout storage compared to untreated in both storage
environments.
Waxing extended the shelf life of ‘Apple’ mango fruits by 4 days in ambient
and 6 days under cold storage.
Reduced cumulative weight loss resulted from reduced number of lenticels
through which water transpires hence maintaining turgidity, enhancing the
exterior aesthetic appeal by imparting a sheen and gloss (Bai et al., 2002;
Yahia, 2002). Also, loss of water soluble nutrients such as Vitamin C was
reduced (Valero and Serrano, 2010).
The low CO2 levels observed in waxed fruits could be attributed to the
reduced gas permeability across the fruit surface. Similar ndings have been
reported in mango coated with edible coatings (Moalemiyan et al., 2012). Waxed
fruits remained rmer compared to the untreated which could be attributed to
reduced activity of cell wall enzymes
Waxed fruits in both storage environment performed better than the untreated
indicating the eectiveness of wax in shelf life extension and preservation of
postharvest quality.
Findings from the study suggests waxing to be an eective alternative
postharvest technology which can be adopted in postharvest handling of
mangos during transit or marketing.
The research was sponsored by UPL Ltd and Decco Ltd
Benson Maina1, Jane Ambuko1, Margaret Hutchinson1 and Willis Owino2
1Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection, University of Nairobi: 2Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
OBJECTIVES
MATERIALS AND METHODS
RESULTS
DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Figure 1: Eect of waxing on CWL of apple mango fruits that were store in ambient (A) and cold storage (B)
Figure 2:. Eect of waxing on CO2 concentration of apple mango fruits that were store in ambient (A) and
cold storage (B)
Mango fruit on tree
Shellac wax treated
Untreated
Mango wax treated
Respiration and transpiration are the major factors contributing to postharvest deterioration in fruits. Mango, like many fruits comprises about 70% water
which is lost to its surrounding due to water pressure decit. The cuticle, which is a waxy layer on the surface of fruits, meant to reduce water loss to
the environment, is mostly lost during washing or when fruits rub against each other in storage or transit. Coating fruits with wax can compensate for
the lost natural wax, and provide a barrier to water and gas diusion by reducing the number and/or the size of lenticels. This leads to water saturation
inside the fruit as well as reducing O2 diusing in and CO2 leaving the fruit thereby slowing down transpiration and respiration respectively.
INTRODUCTION
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CUMULATIVE WEIGHT LOSS (%)
DAYS IN STORAGE
Untreated 3% Shellac
5% Shellac Mango wax
Mango wax+Prochloraz
B
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10
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40
50
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CO2 CONCENTRATION (ML/KG HR)
DAYS IN STORAGE
Untreated 3% Shellac
5% Shellac Mango wax
Mango wax+Prochloraz
A
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10
20
30
40
50
60
0815 22 28
CO2 CONCENTRATION (ML/KG HR)
DAYS IN STORAGE
Untreated 3%Shellac
5%Shellac Mango wax
Mango wax+Prochloraz
B
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