Article
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

If scholars suffer from imperfect attention, they will not always cite the best paper on a particular topic. The most chosen scholarly works may merely be the most cited ones, not the best articles. Here, a paper is chosen when someone cites it, after paying attention to it. Manuscripts’ authors might affect preferences by using salience to influence what scholars pay attention to. In our work, paying attention to an article is when someone reads it. For instance, authors can submit the research works to top-tier journals in the discipline, and thus enter the salient papers of the readers. However, do such competitive forces tend to correct choice errors caused by reader’s imperfect attention? In this short communication, we study about how the competition between research works for publication may ensure that the best paper is the one having the highest probability to be cited. According to the model, the best papers are the ones published in the journal with the highest citation impact. Therefore, these papers are also the ones that have the highest probability to attract attention and the highest probability of being cited.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Such citations might be termed "deterrent" citations. If scholars receive unwarranted attention, the quality of their publications is not necessarily correlated with their citation numbers (García et al. 2019). The situation is further complicated by a recent case in which an article was revised because it contained incorrect data but whose original version continued to be widely cited after the revision was published (da Silva and Dobránszki 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
We examined whether the publication characteristics of various scientific disciplines exhibit age-related trends. Our analysis was based on two large data sets comprising all major scientific disciplines. Citation data for European Research Council grant holders (ERC, n = 756) were obtained from Google Scholar. Publication data for Hungarian researchers (HUN, n = 2469) were obtained from the Hungarian Scientific Work Archive. The evaluated performance parameters include the number of citations received and the number of high quality first/last author papers published in the last five years. We designated the time between maximum growth and the achieved maximal annual value of total citations as the Golden Age of a researcher. Regarding citation growth, the mean age at the highest growth was 41.75 and 41.53 years for ERC grantees and Hungarian researchers, respectively. Each discipline had different values, with mathematics (38.5 years, ERC) and biology (34.7 years, HUN) having the youngest mean age of highest citation growth and agriculture (45.2 years, ERC) and language sciences (49.9 years, HUN) having the oldest mean age. The maximal growth of publications occurred at 44.5 years, with physics starting first (40.5 years, HUN) and language sciences as last (51.4 years, HUN). Most academic careers require decades to reach their peak and the length of the period of maximum performance varies across disciplines. The most creative time period is rising and is currently in the second half of the forties. Identifying the Golden Age in diverse research careers may be of substantial help in the distribution of grants and tenure positions.
... OLDAL DOI: 10.20311/stat2020.8.hu0909 mányos teljesítmény alapján]) alapját a tudománymetriai mutatók (publikációk száma és/vagy a rájuk kapott citációk) képezik. Ugyanakkor számos aggály társul az alkalmazott indikátorokhoz (például Kacem-Flatt-Mayr [2020], García-Rodriguez-Sánchez-Fdez-Valdivia [2019], Braun [2008], Yu-Wang [2007]). A publikációk és a hivatkozások nem elégséges indikátorok az egyetemek tudományos teljesítményének értékeléséhez (Frey-Rost [2010]), mert nem tekinthetők teljes értékű minőségi mutatóknak (Chatzimichael-Kalaitzidakis-Tzouvelekas [2017]). ...
Article
Full-text available
The article investigates the predictors of citation rate in the Russian Science Citation Index (RSCI) for Russian publications in psychology. Four groups of indicators are analyzed: formal attributes of a publication (12 indicators), parameters of publication visibility on eLibrary (3 indicators) and PsyJournals (2 indicators) that define accessibility of publication to potential readers, and author-based citation parameters (3). Special attention is paid to citation parameters as qualitative characteristics of the author's method of elaborating the scientific text and construing dialogue (in the form of citations) with other researchers. Relationship between the indicators analyzed and the RSCI citation rate is proven statistically using the multivariate statistical methods of factor analysis and cluster analysis. For each of the four groups, the strongest predictors of citation rate are identified by multiple regression analysis, which are then compared by their predictive power. It is shown that visibility (accessibility) indicators are the best predictors of citation rate, followed by formal publication attributes and, finally, citation type parameters as having the lowest predictive power. The method of logistic regression allows to identify the ultimate predictors of citation rate and measure their accuracy in predicting whether a publication is low- or highly cited, which is 77.3% and 72.9% for the indicators of visibility on PsyJournals and eLibrary (respectively), 69.9% for formal attributes, and 60.9% for citation parameters. A publication that has few in-text citations is very likely to have a low RSCI citation rate, yet a high number of in-text citations does not guarantee a high citation impact. Recommendations are provided for authors to increase their citation rates. The sample is represented by 662 publications in six Russian psychology journals, each indexed in the RSCI, Web of Science, and Scopus.
Article
Full-text available
When measuring quality and value of journals, what is being measured, to whom does the value accrue, and why the measurement is being done must be considered. Both implicit and explicit measures of quality and value are possible. Preliminary results of ongoing readership research show that academic library e-journal collections have both purchase and use value to academic faculty. They spend their time reading, read many articles each year, and reading benefits their work in many ways.
Article
Here, we study readers’ choice in a context in which scholar’s attention is drawn to salient attributes of academic papers such as importance or accessibility. An article’s attribute is salient when it stands out among the paper’s attributes relative to that attribute’s average level in the choice set. In our model, scholars may attach disproportionately high consideration to salient attributes of academic articles. This paper shows that, depending on the writing complexity in determining article importance, scientific communication in some research fields exhibits accessibility–salient equilibria in which scholars are most attentive to accessibility and less sensitive to article importance. Generalist disciplines (the social and human sciences) with an abundance of multidisciplinary journals which publish research in several fields can be described in this way. In other academic disciplines, scholars are attentive to article importance and are to some extent insensitive to differences in accessibility. There, journals compete on article importance, which can be over-supplied relative to the efficient level of a scholarly paper. One academic discipline with an abundance of highly-specific journals within a sub-field of physics/mathematics/engineering can be described by such equilibria. We also explore the possibility of radical change in scholarly communication when the use of writing complexity in determining article importance changes drastically, whereby a journal acquires access to a revolutionary system of determining articles whose importance is at a much lower writing complexity that its competitor journal. There, when the marginal complexity in determining importance is low, a large improvement in importance entails only a small decrease in accessibility. This allows the academic journal to set a salient high article importance and to win the scholars’ attention, which is named as the ‘Nature effect’.
Article
There are many situations in which alternatives ranked by quality wish to be chosen and compete for the imperfect attention of a chooser by selecting their own salience. The chooser may be “tricked” into choosing more salient but inferior alternatives. We investigate when competitive forces ensure instead that (strictly) higher salience is diagnostic of (strictly) higher quality, and the most frequently chosen alternative is the best one. We prove that the structure of externalities in the technology of salience is key. Broadly speaking, positive externalities in salience favour correlation between quality and salience. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Article
This paper provides a formal study on manuscript quality control in peer review. Within this analysis, a biased editor is defined operationally as an editor that exerts a higher (lower) level of quality control. Here we show that if the editor is more biased than the manuscript’s author then the author undertakes the type of revision that the editor prefers instead of following his or her own opinion. Moreover, authors with a strong belief about the required level of quality control will be very motivated under editors who agree with them. By contrast, when authors do not undertake the revision type that the editor prefers, they will be very demotivated under editors that exert a different level of quality control and more so as the associate editor is more biased. The effects of editors’ bias on authors’ satisfaction and motivation cause sorting in the authors who submit manuscripts to scholarly journals, and therefore, match authors and journals with similar quality standards. It will decrease the demotivating effect that editors’ bias had on some authors, so that bias becomes more effective at the peer review stage. Moreover, some journals will be forced to lower the quality standards in order to be able to compete with journals of more biased editors. This paper also shows that, under fairly weak conditions, it is optimal for the Editor-in-Chief to assign manuscripts to an editor that exerts a quality control higher than the journal’s standard, against the competing journal whose editor holds the journal’s standard.
Article
We present a model of market competition in which consumers' attention is drawn to the products' most salient attributes. Firms compete for consumer attention via their choices of quality and price. Strategic positioning of a product affects how all other products are perceived. With this attention externality, depending on the cost of producing quality some markets exhibit “commoditized” price salient equilibria, while others exhibit “de-commoditized” quality salient equilibria. When the costs of quality change, innovation can lead to radical shifts in markets, as in the case of decommoditization of the coffee market by Starbucks. In the context of financial innovation, the model generates the phenomenon of “reaching for yield”.
Article
In this paper, we analyze the problem faced by impatient researchers attempting to balance the considerations of journal quality, submission lags, and acceptance probabilities in choosing appropriate outlets for their work. We first study the case in which probabilities of submission outcomes are exogenous parameters and show that authors can find the optimal submission path through the use of journal 'scores' based only on the journals' characteristics and the author's degree of impatience. Then, we analyze a more realistic framework in which acceptance probability is determined by the quality of the manuscript, in which the reviewing process may be imperfect, and in which authors may not be certain of the manuscript's quality. Throughout, we illustrate our analysis with data on actual economics journals. We also consider the problem of journals facing a large number of submissions, limited space, and limited resources to review papers and, in particular, we examine the relative effectiveness of using submission fees and reviewing lags to ration article submissions.
Electronic journals and changes in scholarly article seeking and reading patterns
  • C Tenopir
  • D W King
  • S Edwards
  • L Wu
Tenopir, C., King, D. W., Edwards, S., & Wu, L. (2009). Electronic journals and changes in scholarly article seeking and reading patterns. Aslib Proceedings, 61(1), 5-32. https ://doi.org/10.1108/00012 53091 09322 67.