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Advances in calculation methods for the determination of surface tensions in drop profile analysis tensiometry

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Abstract

Dynamic surface tensions are extensively studied to gain properties of liquid adsorption layers [1]. The drop profile analysis tensiometry (PAT) is superior over other methods for the following advantages [2]: PAT is a contactless method and therefore has a higher accuracy as compared to contact methods, for example ring or plate tensiometry.

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... carried out by the program included in PAT-2, using the Fourier transform and the model described in [14]. Dilatational module E is presented in [15][16][17] as a complex indicator that includes real and imaginary components: ...
... It can be noted that the results using the drop shape method may differ from rheological parameters for a flat surface. For a flat surface with the diffusion mechanism of adsorption of a surfactant, both components of the module are given by the equations [15,16]: ...
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