Conference PaperPDF Available

Abstract

Food and wine are an important part of our everyday lives, not just for sustenance, but for the enjoyment and human interactions it invokes. "If food is the body of good living, wine is its soul" (Clifton Faddiman, Author). In our workshop, On and Off the Table: Re-Imagining Food and Wine Interactions, we will examine the ways in which current human experiences of food and wine can be re-imagined and extended through the use of interactive technologies. HCI research has shown that food is regularly informed and shaped by digital device use. The same is happening in interactions with wine. This workshop will explore new practices in human-food interaction (HFI) and human-wine interaction (HWI), both on and off the table, including: playing with food, use of technology, digital and live storytelling, 3D food printing, DIY wine fermentation tools, music, sharing experiences. We invite contributions from researchers, designers, food and wine scientists and enthusiasts, industry partners (restaurateurs, winemakers) and other practitioners interested in working towards a complex framework for future HFI and HWI research.
On and Off the Table: Re-Imagining Food and Wine Interactions
Hilary Davis, Jeni Paay
Swinburne University of
Technology
Melbourne, Australia
(hdavis)(jpaay)@swin.edu.au
Jesper Kjeldskov
Human-Centred Computing
Aalborg University
Aalborg, Denmark
jesper@cs.aau.dk
Markéta Dolejšová
Communication and New Media
National University of Singapore
Singapore
marketa@u.nus.edu
ABSTRACT
Food and wine are an important part of our everyday lives, not
just for sustenance, but for the enjoyment and human interactions
it invokes. “If food is the body of good living, wine is its soul
(Clifton Faddiman, Author).
In our workshop, On and Off the Table: Re-Imagining Food and
Wine Interactions, we will examine the ways in which current
human experiences of food and wine can be re-imagined and
extended through the use of interactive technologies. HCI
research has shown that food is regularly informed and shaped by
digital device use. The same is happening in interactions with
wine. This workshop will explore new practices in human-food
interaction (HFI) and human-wine interaction (HWI), both on and
off the table, including: playing with food, use of technology,
digital and live storytelling, 3D food printing, DIY wine
fermentation tools, music, sharing experiences. We invite
contributions from researchers, designers, food and wine scientists
and enthusiasts, industry partners (restaurateurs, winemakers) and
other practitioners interested in working towards a complex
framework for future HFI and HWI research.
CCS CONCEPTS
• Human-centred Computing • Interaction Design
KEYWORDS
Human-food interaction, Human-wine interaction, digital food
cultures, food design, wine and experience design, quantified
diets, kitchenware, food sharing.
ACM Reference format:
Hilary Davis, Jeni Paay, Jesper Kjeldskov and Markéta Dolejšová. 2018.
On and Off the Table: Re-Imagining Food and Wine Interactions. In
Proceedings of OZCHI 2018. ACM, New York, NY, USA, x pages.
https://doi.org/xx
1 Introduction
There is an old saying ‘the family that eats together stays
together’. At heart, this is a call for commensality at mealtimes.
Many have taken up this call with dedicated time allocated to
making and eating meals together, and a bid to alleviate disruption
to shared family meal times, particularly dinnertime. Parenting
groups, politicians and others have advocated for a ban on digital
devices at mealtimes. Evan Pope Francis has called the use of
mobile phones at the dinner table ‘the start of war’. However,
mealtimes are usually social affairs, which include a variety of
forms of interruption including from children, pets, and
technology. Equally, technology is pervading our dining
experiences away from the home. From the street café, to fine
dining, our experiences of food and wine are being shaped and
augmented by new opportunities offered through interactive
technologies. From Instagram documentation of meals as they are
served, through assistance in food and wine selection, to
understanding the providence and stories behind the food and
wine we consume, to food-related games offered at restaurants –
all are now at our fingertips.
HCI research has shown that food consumption is regularly
informed and shaped by digital device use [5]. This includes
digital food technologies such as diet trackers, food and wine
information and sharing apps, or 'smart' kitchenware.
This workshop examines what happens when the experience of
consuming food and wine is re-imagined through the use of
everyday and specialized technologies augmenting, disrupting or
empowering human-food and human-wine interactions. We will
explore new experiences of food and wine related activities, both
on and off the table including: playing with food, use of
technology, digital and live storytelling, 3D food printing, music,
sharing experiences, etc. All are welcome – both on and off the
table.
The workshop addresses both present and emerging digital food
practices and seeks to extend the existing body of HFI research,
while introducing HWI, as a new research area. It aims to
challenge common food creating, eating and sharing practices
through the introduction of a variety of mechanisms including
play, storytelling, technology supporting disruption, etc. We invite
participants to bring devices, games, children, music, food and
wine as materials, and other activities to our workshop table.
Through the re-imagining of mundane eating practices by using a
variety of human and non-human drivers, we will engage in
scenario building and food-tech prototyping navigated by,
amongst other things, bespoke Digital Food Cards
(http://materie.me/digifood). Using these and other elements
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OzCHI '18, December 4–7, 2018, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
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ACM ISBN 978-1-4503-6188-0/18/12.
https://doi.org/10.1145/3292147.3293452
OZCHI’18, December, 2018, Melbourne, Australia
H. Davis et al.
introduced by participants, we seek to unpack issues and suggest
approaches to design future interactions that extend human
experiences of food and wine. We invite proposals from
researchers, designers, and other practitioners interested in
working towards a complex framework for HFI/HWI research.
2 Background
Technology design is increasingly contributing to people's
everyday food and wine lifestyles, which raises many
opportunities and concerns about the future of food and wine
systems. The entanglements of digital technology and food
cultures have brought about various types of 'fruit', ranging from
community-driven food sharing platforms [12, 31] to $700 juicers
that can squeeze a bag of mashed fruit with almost the same
efficiency as a pair of human hands [13]. While claiming that
"food is the new internet" [21] some food-tech proponents tend to
portray technology as a means to revolutionize food systems. On
the other hand, critics see such digital food efforts as a prime
example of technological solutionism - the belief that technology
design can fully solve complex societal problems [19,20].
HCI community has addressed the opportunities and limitations of
digital technology in everyday food practices under the umbrella
framework of Human-Food Interaction (HFI) [1,5,14,15]. For
instance, Dolejšová & Kera [9] show positive impacts of diet
tracking and data sharing services on users' food literacy but
highlight related health safety and data security risks. Lupton &
Turner [18] identified the potential of 3D food printing
kitchenware in user's playful engagement with personal dietary
health, but also its undue distance from present food cultures that
made consumers hesitant to use it. Scholars have frequently
discussed the positive environmental impacts of digital
technology used for the sharing of home cooked meals, seasonal
harvest, and food leftovers [5,12,31]. The same food sharing
technologies have also been criticized for contributing to the food
market fragmentation and for their limited affordances regarding
public health safety [31].
Opportunities and limitations of digital systems (e.g., open maps,
drones, mobile apps, IoT sensors) in promoting sustainable
behavior have been explored in the context of wild food practices
such as food gleaning and foraging [3,7]. Interactive digital
technology was shown to have positive impacts on commensality
experiences at a family dinner table [11], while at the same time
reinforcing intergenerational gaps regarding digital literacy [4].
Kuznetsov et al. [17] suggested a potential use of digital
technology in advancing at-home food science activities such as
DIY food fermentation. In contrast, Dolejšová & Kera [8] saw
only a peripheral interest of fermentation enthusiasts in using
'hacked' digital gadgets for their DIY food experiments. Although
still in its infancy, and without providing firm conclusions, the
emerging body of HFI research outlines digital food issues and
concerns such as these, and invites further interdisciplinary
research.
Human-wine interaction (HWI) is a new research area, building
on ideas initiated and explored in the OZCHI 2015 workshop
Wine and Interaction Design [22]. There is limited research and
practice in HCI literature that relates directly to human wine
interaction. However, we can find research in ubiquitous
computing exploring the use of sensor networks in the vineyard
[2]. There are design projects related to consumption of wine, for
example, using digital media experiences to enhance wine
selection and tasting [23], and the delivery of extensive wine
information through apps [28], or making of DIY kits and blogs
for at-home wine fermentation [25, 8, 30]. In bringing together
food and wine, HFI research can inspire approaches to HWI
research.
3 Motivation and Goals
This workshop seeks to extend the existing body of HFI and HWI
research by re-imagining food and wine practices, and
understanding future implications and affects – on commensality
and individual experiences. In particular we examine influences
such as messy food, food play, game playing (whether facilitated
by technology or not), food tracking, environmental factors (such
as noise, music, lighting), digital media experiences, etc., have on
workshop attendees engaging in making, eating and sharing food
and wine. Do these new activities impact negatively on
commensality and experience? Do they serve to help bond like-
minded individuals, or drive them further apart physically and
emotionally? Are some new practices sanctioned while others are
banned? How does the collective respond to individual
participants who disrupt normal food and wine activities? Overall
we are interested in whether new practices culminate in a
disruptive, fragmented experience? Do they bring participants
closer together, or push them further apart, or do they in fact,
leave participants with a positive experience and an overall sense
of joie de vie on or off the table?
Overall this workshop addresses the personal, social,
environmental, and policy implications of digital technologies
used in everyday food and wine practices. More specifically, our
focus is on a technology used for:
1. play (e.g., celebratory technology [11,14], food-based games
[1])
2. making (e.g., 'smart' kitchenware [14,15,18]; AI-based and
digitally augmented cookbooks [6,24])
3. learning (e.g., information, stories, comparisons to enhance
the experience of buying or tasting wine [28])
4. diet planning (e.g., diet tracking devices and personalized
nutrition services [9,26])
5. sharing (e.g., digital food sharing platforms, open mapping
and ubicomp systems [5,8,11,31])
6. dining (e.g., restaurant dining, social dining services and
intergenerational interaction at the dinner table [6,11])
We will approach these digital food and wine practices as a
contested area navigated by multiple stakeholders from corporate
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H. Davis et al.
and governmental, as well as private and NGO sectors. We are
also interested in digital food and wine practices originating from
personal interaction between co-located and dispersed parties such
as families, friends, neighbors, co-workers and vendors. Our aim
is to critically unpack issues surrounding digital food and wine
technologies and address questions such as: What are the
advantages and challenges that digital food and wine
technologies bring into people’s everyday life? How can we
design to scaffold the development of playful but also sustainable
and just digital food and wine cultures? What issues are faced in
contemporary HFI and HWI research and how could we address
them in the future?
Building on our inaugural SIG CHI meeting at CHI 2017 [15] and
subsequent FoodCHI symposium [16], our CHI2018 workshop
[10], and our inaugural OZCHI 2015 “Wine and Interaction
Designworkshop [22], our broad aim is to help nurture the
existing research into everyday digital food and wine cultures and
develop a strong community of HFI and HWI scholars. We invite
interdisciplinary contributions from researchers, designers, food
and wine scientists, industry partners (restaurateurs, winemakers)
and other practitioners interested in working towards a complex
framework for future HFI and HWI research. The organizers
themselves have very diverse practical and theoretical experiences
with the above areas of digital food and wine practices, which will
help guide the workshop activities and also drive the participants'
selection process.
4 Workshop Details
4.1 Workshop Themes
The workshop themes reflect on implications of digital technology
utilized for everyday food and wine practices and outline related
design challenges. The themes cover (but are not limited to) the
following areas:
1. Personal implications: What are the impacts of digital
technology on user's food and wine-related literacy? How is
digital technology utilized in health and diet self-
experimentation? How does technology affect user's
emotional relationship with food, wine and consumption?
How does digital technology impact on others at the table?
How can we design to best ensure and support the food and
wine-related health and wellbeing of individuals and
communities?
2. Social and cultural implications: What impact do new food
and wine practices, in many forms, have on commensality
and individual experiences? How does it detract from or
contribute to the dining experience? What aspects should be
embraced? Which should be challenged? What changes does
digital technology particularly provide to the user, and to
those present during eating and drinking? What impact does
it have on commensality experiences? How do disrupting
technologies affect traditional food eating practices, such as
‘table manners’? What impact does it have on traditional
culinary techniques? How do we recognize and design for
new technologies in our food and wine interactions while
supporting commensal or enhanced experiences?
3. Policy implications: What kind of data is produced and
shared via digital food and wine technology, by whom, and
for what ends? Which stakeholders are involved and who is
excluded from digital food and wine practices? What are the
existing and potential uses of digital technology for food
activism? How can design support safe exchanges of
personal food and wine-related data?
4. Environmental implications: To what extent can digital
technology support sustainable food and wine practices?
What are the opportunities of digital technology in advancing
user's environmental consciousness? How can we design for
playful, but also critical user engagement with sustainable
food and wine practices?
4.2 Pre-Workshop Plans
We will ask potential participants to submit a one-page proposal,
including abstract and planned workshop activity, which directly
or indirectly addresses the workshop themes. Participants will be
encouraged to bring a conversation artefact or motivator to the
workshop table. This may be human (e.g., child, friend, elder);
technological (e.g., a working prototype of their digital food
design; 3D food printer, eating app, fitbit, smart phone, electronic
reader etc), food (e.g. bean-boozled sweets, Heston Blumental
foods: foods disguised as other dishes), liquid (wine, steam,
colour) or other (e.g. games, music, lighting etc). Note:
unfortunately participants cannot bring their pets, fish are
welcome but may be consumed.
All accepted abstracts will be placed on the workshop website
(https://jeni92.wixsite.com/hci-food-and-wine) along with other
works related to workshop themes. We will promote the workshop
through personal connections including our Facebook site, social
media, HCI mailing lists, the workshop website, and other
relevant channels. We expect to host up to 20 participants.
4.3 Workshop Structure and Activities
This full-day workshop will be non-traditional and focus on hands
on participation in food and wine planning, food and wine
making, food and wine sharing, food and wine eating, through
non-traditional showcasing of participants artefacts brought to the
table. Participants will be encouraged to engage in food, wine and
technology play, group discussions, consumption, recording of
meals, and any other new practices introduced by fellow
participants. This hands-on session will be followed by informal
group discussions and playful prototyping of various food and
wine-tech designs and scenarios which recognize the nuances of
these re-imagined practices, and the impact on commensality and
experience. The workshop is broken into five main sessions:
Session 1 (9am-9:30): We will start by introducing the workshop
themes, agenda for the day, workshop organisers and participants.
Session 2 (9:30-11.am): Participants will give three minute
presentations (maximum 3 PowerPoint slides) based on their
abstracts, followed by a short Q&A session. We will make sure to
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provide a sufficient space for participants to exchange mutual
feedback on the presented work. A group discussion on our
perspectives on the intersection of food/wine and technology will
follow. Depending on the number of participants, the discussion
will be carried out in a round table format or within smaller
groups.
Session 3 (11-2pm): Following on the presentations and
discussion, we will engage in a range of activities including
creating, making and playing with food and wine. Participants
may decide to consume (or not). We will encourage various
playful, participatory, experiential and disruptive activities around
food. Workshop participants will engage in playful interaction
with food, technology, and other props brought by participants
and organizers. The idea behind this activity is to prompt
discussions by taking inspiration from re-imagined food and wine
practices, extending on experiences had during this session.
Figure 1: Digital Food Cards
Session 4 (2-3pm): Post lunch, we will continue with small-group
activities comprising of scenarios and hands-on prototyping that
will be navigated by bespoke Digital Food Cards (figure 1) (found
at: http://materie.me/digifood).
The card deck outlines 23 existing as well as anticipated
speculative food-tech practices ranging from Urban Foraging, Gut
Gardening and Food Gadgeteering to more radical envisionment
of food routines adopted by Turing Foodies, Drone Hunters and
DNA Diet Fatalists. We will relate these, as much as is relevant to
wine practices. Instead of suggesting any answers or solutions, the
cards raise questions and provoke the players to speculate: What
changes does digital technology afford to our everyday food and
wine experiences? What opportunities and frictions would
technology pose to future food and wine lifestyles? What are the
present and near-future Datavore's dilemmas? Would Turing
Foodies trust each other? Would Gut Gardener date a Food
Psychonaut? Where would a Food NeoPunker and Foodcaster go
for a Friday night dinner? Can we imagine a Wine Psychonaut,
Wine NeoPunker, and Winecaster?
Inspired by a similar card technique used by Vines et al. [27] we
hope this ambiguity will provoke playful participant engagement
as well as critical reasoning about existing and near-future digital
food and wine lifestyles. Participants working in groups will map
selected cards on the four main workshop themes and discuss
related opportunities and limitations. Each group will be invited to
create scenarios addressing the outlined issues and design 'digital
food prototypes' and ‘digital wine prototypesto embody the
scenarios in actual (or even edible) form. Food, wine and
technology materials for prototyping will be provided by
workshop organizers; participants will be invited to bring
prototypes and demos of their own digital food and wine designs.
We will also provide blank cards for participants to create
additional food card topics and ideas, and to invent a series of
wine card topics, should they have some.
Session 5 (3-4pm): We will ask every group to showcase their
prototypes and scenarios and outline the design approaches that
they have taken. The workshop will be wrapped-up by
summarizing preliminary results related to the discussed ideas.
4.4 Post Workshop Plans
All accepted submissions will be included in the dedicated
workshop proceedings, published as a technical report and placed
on the workshop’s website. The website will summarize outcomes
of the workshop and provide a space for ongoing discussion and
sharing of resources even after the workshop concludes. This will
comprise of scenarios, prototypes, and other media content
created during the workshop to be archived on the website. To
document and share the workshop activities in near-real-time, we
will use standard social media tools (Twitter, Facebook,
Instagram, etc.). Depending on the interest and quality of
contributions we will explore the viability of a special issue in an
established journal of HCI.
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5 Organisers
Hilary Davis is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Social
Impact, Swinburne University of Technology. Her work
investigates the role digital technologies play in people’s work,
social activities and home lives. She is interested in how digital
cookbooks, and digital technologies generally, might impact on
intergenerational familial relationships at mealtimes
(http://hilaryjdavis.com/).
Jeni Paay is Associate Professor in Interaction Design at the
School of Design, Swinburne University of Technology. She is
Director of the “User Experience for Services research program
in the Centre for Design Innovation, where UX in Wine Tourism
is a key project area. (jenipaay.com)
Jesper Kjeldskov is Professor of Human-Computer Interaction at
Aalborg University, Denmark. He leads the Human-Centred
Computing group where key research areas include domestic
computing, mobile interaction design, and blended spaces for
distributed collaborative practices such as cooking together.
(http://people.cs.aau.dk/~jesper/)
Markéta Dolejšová is a Ph.D. candidate at the National
University of Singapore focusing on socio-technical contexts of
digital food lifestyles. Her practice-based research refers to
Speculative and Critical Design methodologies that she extends
into participatory public engagement events (http://materie.me).
6 Call For Participation
Technology design is increasingly contributing to people's
everyday food and wine lifestyles and offers promising yet
debatable food and wine futures. Diet-tracking devices, food
sharing apps, wine sharing apps, 'smart' kitchenware and other
food and wine-tech create both opportunities and risks related to
users health, food literacy, and social life. This workshop
addresses present and near-future digital food and wine practices
and seeks to re-imagine and extend the body of Human-Food
Interaction (HFI) research and Human-Wine Interaction (HWI).
We invite researchers interested in HFI and HWI issues to submit
one page abstracts reflecting on food-tech and wine-tech
implications in following areas: personal implications (literacy,
support for health and well-being, play), social and cultural
implications (impacts on commensality, individual diversity and
commensality), policy implications (what data is produced and
shared by food and wine technology, by whom and for what ends,
how to support safe exchanges of food and wine-related data) and
environmental implications (designing for playful, critical user
engagement with sustainable food practices). Participants are
encouraged to bring a conversation artefact or motivator to the
workshop table. This may be human, technological, food, liquid
or other (e.g. games, music, lighting).
Proposals, max 1page abstract in OzCHI template sent to:
hdavis@swin.edu.au and jpaay@swin.edu.au. Abstracts will be
selected based on originality and relevance to workshop themes.
The workshop activities will comprise of scenarios and food and
wine-tech prototyping navigated by new practices including
bespoke Digital Food Cards. Depending on the interest and
quality of contributions we will explore the viability of a special
issue in an established journal of HCI. At least one author of each
accepted abstract must attend the workshop. Additional attendees
are welcome if space allows.
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... game designers) and gastronomy (e.g. chefs), and will contact participants of previous HFI workshops [6,7,13,19]. We expect to host up to 15 participants. ...
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We propose a Situated Play Design (SPD) workshop aimed at exploring how culture and traditions can guide playful design. Using food as an accessible starting point, we invite scholars from diverse communities to share, analyze, and make creative use of playful traditions, and prototype new and interesting eating experiences. Through hands-on engagement with traditions, play and technology, we will discuss strategies to make designerly use of forms of play that are embedded in culture. The outcomes of the workshop will be twofold: First, in response to recent calls for increasingly situated and emergent play design methods, we explore strategies to chase culturally-grounded play. Second, we produce an annotated portfolio of "play potentials" to inspire the design of future food-related technologies. The workshop will contribute to enriching the set of tools available for designers interested in play and technologies for everyday-use, in and beyond the food domain.
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