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Case Study: Voxy "English for Software Engineering" – The Conception and Creation of an E-Learning English-Language Course Tailored to Learners’ Real-World Needs

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Abstract

This case study provides an overview of Voxy’s language-learning platform and the needs analysis conducted to determine the content required for its “English for Software Engineering” course, which received a 2018 International E-Learning Award in the Business Division. This study documents Voxy’s methodology and theoretical underpinnings. Further, the report outlines the rationale behind using authentic, real-world content, how the company identified the English skills that software engineers require to do their jobs, and how a team of working software engineers provided both guidelines and raw materials to help develop the course content.

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Online language learning in the workplace: Maximizing efficiency, effectiveness, and time-on-task
  • K Nielson
Nielson, K. (2013). Online language learning in the workplace: Maximizing efficiency, effectiveness, and time-on-task. Proceedings from the International Conference of E-Learning in the Workplace. June 12th -14 th, New York, NY.
PhD, is an applied linguist specializing in instructed second language acquisition and Chief Education Officer at Voxy. The company is based
  • Iela Award Winner Voxy English For Software Engineering Author Katharine
  • B Nielson
IELA AWARD WINNER VOXY ENGLISH FOR SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AUTHOR Katharine B. Nielson, PhD, is an applied linguist specializing in instructed second language acquisition and Chief Education Officer at Voxy. The company is based in New York, New York. (katie@voxy.com)