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Islamophobia: A British Muslim Perspective: Recognition, Prevention, and Treatment

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Abstract

The rise of radicalisation, the demonisation of Muslims by demagogues and segments of the British media and the immigration crisis in Europe are all factors that collude and contribute to heightened levels of Islamophobia in the United Kingdom (UK). Islamophobia has been associated with psychological distress in Muslims. However, reputable organisations such as the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the Muslim Council of Britain have raised concerns that the British government’s controversial countering violent extremism programme Prevent may be a barrier to mental health services for Muslims. This book chapter provides background information about the insidious and pervasive phenomenon of Islamophobia in the UK, how Islamophobia has infiltrated British public mental healthcare and the consequences that this has on both providers and users of mental healthcare services.

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