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Robak zjada jaguara: procesy tworzenia relacji z perspektywy Amazonii zachodniej

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Robak zjada jaguara: procesy tworzenia relacji z perspektywy Amazonii zachodniej

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American Kinship is the first attempt to deal systematically with kinship as a system of symbols and meanings, and not simply as a network of functionally interrelated familial roles. Schneider argues that the study of a highly differentiated society such as our own may be more revealing of the nature of kinship than the study of anthropologically more familiar, but less differentiated societies. He goes to the heart of the ideology of relations among relatives in America by locating the underlying features of the definition of kinship—nature vs. law, substance vs. code. One of the most significant features of American Kinship, then, is the explicit development of a theory of culture on which the analysis is based, a theory that has since proved valuable in the analysis of other cultures. For this Phoenix edition, Schneider has written a substantial new chapter, responding to his critics and recounting the charges in his thought since the book was first published in 1968.
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The metamorphosis of Yurupari : flutes, trumpets and ritual reproduction in the Northwest Amazon. In this article, the author proposes to analyse different mythological figures known in the North-West Amazon as Yurupari. Making a comparison between some ethnographical data from the Miraña, from the Tukano speaking groups of the Vaupes and from the Arawak groups north of the area, it appears that a solitary wasp is the common element of these mythological figures. This wasp reproduces itself using their preys as a receptacle and as food for its offspring. When anthropomorphized by the North-West Amazon populations, this pseudo-parasitical behaviour is seen as an insemination. Along with other characteristics and components from the hymenopter, this behaviour is an essential referent as much for the male initiation ritual as for the prohibition to see the sacred flutes that exists for women, thus constructing ideologically the bodies of both sexes. The contribution will explore the major mythological and ideological implications of this identification.
Wspólnoty wyobrażone: rozważania o zródłach i rozprzestrzenianiu sie nacjonalizmu
  • B R O Anderson
Anderson, B.R.O. (1997). Wspólnoty wyobrażone: rozważania o zródłach i rozprzestrzenianiu sie nacjonalizmu. Przeł. S. Amsterdamski. Kraków-Warszawa: Społeczny Instytut Wydawniczy; Fundacja im. Stefana Batorego.
Des proies si désirables. Soumission et prédation pour les Paumari d'Amazonie brésilienne, praca doktorska
  • L O Bonilla
Bonilla, L.O. (2007). Des proies si désirables. Soumission et prédation pour les Paumari d'Amazonie brésilienne, praca doktorska. Paris: École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales.
Ownership and Nurture: Studies in Native Amazonian Property Relations
  • M Brightman
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Brightman, M., Fausto, C., Grotti, V. (2016). Ownership and Nurture: Studies in Native Amazonian Property Relations. New York-Oxford: Berghahn Books.
Sny, trofea, geny i zmarli: "wojna" w społecznościach przedpaństwowych na przyładzie Amazonii: przegląd koncepcji antropologicznych
  • T Buliński
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Buliński, T., Kairski, M. (red.). (2006). Sny, trofea, geny i zmarli: "wojna" w społecznościach przedpaństwowych na przyładzie Amazonii: przegląd koncepcji antropologicznych. Poznań: Wydawnictwo Naukowe UAM.
Cultures of relatedness: New approaches to the study of kinship
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La muerte y el más allá en las culturas indígenas latinoamericanas (s. 113-124)
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Chaumeil, J.P. (1992). La vida larga. Inmortalidad y ancestralidad en la Amazonía. W: M.S. Cipolletti, E.J. Langdon (eds.), La muerte y el más allá en las culturas indígenas latinoamericanas (s. 113-124). Quito: Abya-Yala.
Beyond the visible and the material: the Amerindianization of society in the work of Peter Rivière (s. 81-100)
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Chaumeil, J.-P. (2001). The blowpipe Indians: variations on the theme of blowpipe and tube among the Yagua Indians of the Peruvian Amazon. W: L. Rival, N.L. Whitehead (eds.), Beyond the visible and the material: the Amerindianization of society in the work of Peter Rivière (s. 81-100). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Salud e interculturalidad en América Latina. Perspectivas antropológicas (s. 265-278)
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Of words and fog: Linguistic relativity and Amerindian ontology
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