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Re-designing the educational experience: Design thinking, participatory action research, and pedagogies of hope.

Authors:
  • Urban Discovery Schools

Abstract

School and school district culture are artifacts of the policies, practices, and beliefs of the institutional systems, communities, and national structures in which they are embedded. Often times these systems remain unchecked and carry hidden assumptions about who, what, when, where, and why educational experiences occur within the context of the greater community. In this keynote address Dr. Loescher explores the importance of a philosophical alignment of our theoretical frameworks and organizational practices of the district/school community to facilitate change in the classroom. He will explain how the methods of Participatory Action Research and the emerging practices of Design Thinking in education are advancing organizational innovation; adult and student learning; and student achievement through a pedagogy hope.
Re-designing the
Educational Experience:
Shawn Thomas Loescher, Ed.D.
Design Thinking,
Participatory Action Research,
and Pedagogies of Hope.
linkedin twitter
researchgate
w w w . s l o e s c h e r . c o m
#designchallenge
#hope
#praxis
#design
e v e r y s y s t e m . . .
10
1020
practice | beliefs | philosophy
culture as artifact
Chronosystem
Macrosystem
Exosystem
Mesosystem
Microsystem
The
Individual
practice philosophy
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
ontology epistemology
theoretical perspective methodology
educational philosophy purpose of school
structure of school who is leading
subjects studied pedagogical strategies
solution orientation what is questioned
role of participants desired outcomes.
all
#designchallenge
essentialist
perennialist
progressivist
reconstructivist
design thinking
design thinking as a way of being
method disposition
empathetic
human-centric
ambiguity
reflexive
visualization
Discover
Create
Evaluate
Ideate
Connect
implications to t/k-12 education
pedagogy
instruction
curriculum
assessments
operations
school culture
development
leadership
action research
action research measuring progress
praxis approach
cyclical
inquiry based
mythological
formal reports
communication
emancipatory
innovation
& plan of
study
implementation
& adoption
reporting
& informing
applications to t/k-12 education
schools
classrooms
operations
programs
community
districts
diffusion model
scalable
adaptive
explanatory
Chronosystem
Macrosystem
Exosystem
Mesosystem
Microsystem
The
Individual
pedagogies of hope
operationalized: hope as a strategy
constructs traits
positive
maintenance
negative
interactive
social dynamics
Goals
AgencyPathway
applications to t/k-12 education
participants
timescales
navigational
self-image
choice
pedagogy
student terms
outcome driven
equity based
liberation
everysystem...
e v e r y s y s t e m . . .
#designchallenge
#designchallenge
#designchallenge
practice philosophy
Re-designing the
Educational Experience:
Shawn Thomas Loescher, Ed.D.
Design Thinking,
Participatory Action Research,
and Pedagogies of Hope.
linkedin twitter
researchgate
w w w . s l o e s c h e r . c o m
References:
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ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Thesis
Full-text available
Students may be situated within complex systems that are nested within each other. This complexity may also envelop institutional structures that lead to the socio-economic reification of student post-secondary opportunities by obscuring positive goals. This may be confounded by community misunderstandings about the changed world that students are entering. These changes include social and economic factors that impact personal and economic freedoms, our ability to live at peace, and the continuing trend of students graduating high school underprepared. Building on previous cycles of action research, this multi-strand mixed-methods study examined the effects of the innovation of the I am College and Career Ready Student Support Program (iCCR). The innovation was collaboratively developed and implemented over a 16-week period using a participatory action research approach. The situated context of this study was a new high school in the urban center of San Diego, California. The innovation included a student program administered during an advisory period and a parent education program. Qualitative research used a critical ethnographic design that analyzed data from artifacts, journals, notes, and the interviews of students (n = 8), parents (n = 6), and teachers (n = 5). Quantitative research included the analysis of data from surveys administered to inform the development of the innovation (n = 112), to measure learning of parent workshop participants (n = 10), and to measure learning, hope, and attitudinal disposition of student participants (n = 49). Triangulation was used to answer the studies’ four research questions. Triangulated findings were subjected to the method of crystallization to search for hidden meanings and multiple truths. Findings included the importance of parent involvement, the influence of positive goals, relational implications of goal setting and pathway knowledge on agentic thinking, and that teacher implementation of the innovation may have influenced student hope levels. This study argued for a grounded theory situated within a theoretical framework based upon Snyder’s Hope Theory and Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System Theory. This argument asserted that influence on pathway and agency occurred at levels of high proximal process with the influence of goal setting occurring at levels of lower proximal process.
Article
Full-text available
In an ever changing society of the 21st century, there is a demand to equip students with meta competences going beyond cognitive knowledge. Education, therefore, needs a transition from transferring knowledge to developing individual potentials with the help of constructivist learning. Advantages of constructivist learning, and criteria for its realisation have been well-determined through theoretical findings in pedagogy (Reich 2008, de Corte, OECD 2010). However, the practical implementation leaves a lot to be desired (Gardner 2010, Wagner 2011). Knowledge acquisition is still fragmented into isolated subjects. Lesson layouts are not efficiently designed to help teachers execute a holistic and interdisciplinary learning. As is shown in this paper, teachers are having negative classroom experience with project work or interdisciplinary teaching, due to a constant feeling of uncertainty and chaos, as well as lack of a process to follow. We therefore conclude: there is a missing link between theoretical findings and demands by pedagogy science and its practical implementation. We claim that, Design Thinking as a team-based learning process offers teachers support towards practice-oriented and holistic modes of constructivist learning in projects. Our case study confirms an improvement of classroom experience for teacher and student alike when using Design Thinking. This leads to a positive attitude towards constructivist learning and an increase of its implementation in education. The ultimate goal of this paper is to prove that Design Thinking gets teachers empowered to facilitate constructivist learning in order to foster 21st century skills.
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Design thinking in the management context has suffered from vague definition, gaps in literature, and lack of theoretical foundation. Research streams in absorptive capacity and dynamic capabilities have reached a point of convergence with respect to design thinking and absorption of external knowledge. As such, this study draws on both absorptive capacity and dynamic capability theory to provide theoretical foundation for the strategic consideration of design thinking in strategy, organization design, and organizational learning. In doing so, this study extends seminal absorptive capacity theory providing empirical evidence of design thinking as a dynamic capability to enhance absorptive capacity. Additionally, this study extends dynamic capabilities theory by confirming design thinking as a means of integration, learning, and reconfiguring knowledge to build competitive advantage. Therefore, this study merges existing research streams to empirically validate design thinking as a dynamic capability which must be strategically considered.
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Book
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Design is now the key driver of innovation and change within organisations across the globe. Learn how, when and why to use design to drive change in your organisation. TRANSFORMATIONS: 7 Roles to Drive Change by Design documents how design is being used to support change across different organisations, countries and sectors, sharing the stories of experts in their fields at varying stages of their transformative journeys. We feature 13 organisations including Steelcase, Spotify, Deloitte Australia, SAP, Telstra, US Department of Veterans A airs and Accenture & Fjord.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
What motivators and pedagogical values within the administration’s immediate control might encourage teachers to self-initiate a change in their instructional practice to Project-Based Learning (PBL)? This action research study examined why some teachers self-initiate a change to PBL.
Thesis
Full-text available
Research supports that Project-Based Learning (PBL) has a positive impact on student achievement and prepares students with 21st century skills. With over 150 years of presence in American pedagogical practice PBL is rarely used as a primary teaching strategy. This action research study examined why some teachers self-initiate a change to PBL. Findings from this study were used to advance student achievement for college and career readiness by developing an action plan to increase the number of teachers that utilize PBL. This mixed method study investigated what motivators and pedagogical values within the administration’s immediate control might encourage teachers to self-initiate a change in their instructional practice to PBL. Quantitative research examined two null hypotheses on the topics of school culture and desired pedagogical outcomes. Qualitative questions focused on why teachers choose to adopt PBL and what might have helped them to make a change to PBL earlier in their career. Descriptive statistics, cultural aspects, pedagogical values, and intrinsic and extrinsic motivators were triangulated with member checks utilized to increase the validity of findings. This study found that there are common motivators and pedagogical values within the administration’s immediate control that may encourage teachers to self-initiate a change in instructional practice to PBL. Both quantitative null-hypotheses were rejected. Qualitative analysis found that extrinsic motivators within administration’s control were listed as being important to study participants in their change to PBL, in those factors that may have had them change sooner, and in suggestions for future areas for improvements.
Book
Deleuze and Guattari discuss the rhizome as being "absolutely different from roots and radicles" 6. The rhizome is explained via principles. 1 and 2: connection and heterogeneity.: "any point of a rhizome can be connected to anything other, and must be". Principle 3: "Principle of multiplicity" "There are no points or positions in a rhizome, such as those found in a structure, tree, or root. There are only lines". Principle 4: "Principle of asignifying rupture" "There is a rupture in the rhizome whenever segmentary lines explode into a line of flight, but the line of flight is part of the rhizome." Principles 5 and 6: Principle of cartography and decalcomania: Where traditional thought is 'tracing', a rhizome is a map. Tracing involves laying onto reality the pattern of structure, itself a construct. "The map does not reproduce an unconscious closed in upon itself; it constructs the unconscious". They take the term plateau from Gregory Bateson, it refers to a sustained intensity. "We call a 'plateau' any multiplicity connected to other multiplicities by superficial underground stems in such a way as to form or extend a rhizome". "Write with slogans: Make rhizomes, not roots, never plant!"