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Abstract

Purpose Constant efforts have been made to improve prosthesis design in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but a significant number of patients remain dissatisfied postoperatively. Besides poor improvement in pain or function, poor fulfillment of patients expectations were identified as contributing factors. Purpose of the study was to assess fulfillment of patients’ expectations and satisfaction with TKA 5 years after surgery. Methods A total of 103 patients from a prospective randomised study of a high-flexion or standard TKA implant were investigated 5 years after surgery and patient-reported outcomes (PRO), fulfillment of expectations and satisfaction with the result of the surgery were obtained. Results There were no differences in PROs, fulfillment of expectations and satisfaction between both implant designs. In total, the patients had high expectations preoperatively, mainly related to pain relief and functional abilities. A total of 89.4% of these expectations were fulfilled. No re-interventions (p < 0.001) and male gender (p = 0.017) were the most important predictors of higher fulfillment of expectations. Satisfaction scored highly at 8.2 out of 10 and most patients (93.2%) would undergo the surgery again. Higher Knee Score (p = 0.012) and fulfillment of expectations (p = 0.002) were correlated with higher satisfaction. Conclusion Five years after surgery fulfillment of expectations and satisfaction were high regardless of implant design and did significantly influence patient satisfaction. Surgeons should be aware of the importance of patients’ expectations and their influence on satisfaction after TKA. Therefore, the probability of fulfillment should be discussed during shared decision making for TKA. Level of evidence I.

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... The reported percentages of dissatisfaction after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) range from 14% up to 27% [5,6,23,26,28]. This is in contrast to excellent survival rates of 93% after 15 years in several arthroplasty registries [8]. ...
... Different factors have been investigated which influence patient satisfaction. While it is still difficult to predict postoperative satisfaction before TKA [10], there are several well-acknowledged postoperative factors which contribute to patient satisfaction, including improvement in pain and function [28], absence of adverse events [7] and fulfilment of expectations [4,5,23]. However, not all studies have identified the same factors that influence patient satisfaction. ...
... Postoperative variables, that have been linked to patient satisfaction, include the absence of revision surgery [7], [3,7,10], improvement in walking distance and range of motion and fulfilment of expectations [4,5,23,32]. In a systematic review, Gunaratne et al. [12] concluded that higher patient expectations, better function before surgery, less severe osteoarthritis, complications and less improvement in pain and function contribute to dissatisfaction after TKA. ...
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Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate what influence the treatment effect after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) had on patient satisfaction. Methods: Prospective registry data of a University-based arthroplasty centre were used. 582 patients with unilateral bicondylar TKA were analyzed. Treatment effect (TE) was deduced from Oxford Knee Score (OKS) before and one year after surgery. Positive values correspond to improved symptoms (maximum 1.0 reflect no symptoms at all) and negative values correspond to deterioration of symptoms. Satisfaction on a visual-analogue scale from 0 to 10 and the willingness to undergo TKA surgery again was assessed one year after surgery. Results: The mean OKS improved from 22.1 before to 36.7 one year after TKA. Treatment effects ranged from 1.0 to -0.62 with a mean TE of 0.56. Taking an individual treatment effect of 0.2 as a cut-off between responder and non-responder, a total of 85.8% would be classified as responder after TKA. The mean satisfaction score with the TKA was 8.1. There was a significant correlation between the individual treatment effect and satisfaction after TKA (p < 0.001). The majority of patients (84.5%) would undergo surgery again. Patients not willing to undergo surgery again or those uncertain about this had lower satisfaction scores, a lower treatment effect and were more often female compared to patients who would undergo surgery again. Conclusion: Higher individual treatment effects resulted in higher patient satisfaction and willingness to undergo surgery again. However, some patients with a relatively low treatment effect were highly satisfied, which indicates the need for both information. Level of evidence: II.
... Although patients' expectations are the main factor contributing to patient satisfaction after TKA [6,8,16,[25][26][27][28], the role of psychological factors has been paid more attention in recent years [13,14,24,26,[29][30][31][32][33][34][35]. One study found higher levels of 90-day readmission, dissatisfaction, and burden for healthcare providers among patients with depression [33]. ...
... Patients' preoperative expectations in relation to postoperative satisfaction have also been studied [6,8,[25][26][27][28], showing that fulfillment of patients' expectations predicted postoperative patient satisfaction after TKA surgery. In a qualitative study, we found that patients' expectations were still the major contributing factor affecting patient contentment one year after surgery [25]. ...
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IntroductionTotal knee arthroplasty (TKA) is effective in alleviating pain and improving function in patients with knee arthritis. Psychological factors are known to affect patient satisfaction after TKA. It is important to determine the effectiveness of TKA in patients with presurgical anxiety and/or depression to avoid excluding them from surgery.Materials and methodsA prospective cohort study was conducted on all patients who underwent TKA during 2016–2018. Patients were divided into four groups: with anxiety, without anxiety, with depression, and without depression. Outcome measures comprised both generic and knee-specific instruments. Each patient group was compared regarding changes in outcome measures one year after surgery. Between-group comparison was also performed.ResultsOf the 458 patients with complete data, 15.3% and 9.6% had experienced presurgical anxiety and depression, respectively. All patient groups displayed statistical (P < 0.001) and clinical improvement in all outcome measures. Patients with presurgical anxiety and/or depression generally displayed less improvement, though the only significant mean differences concerned the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)-sport score in the non-anxiety and non-depression groups (P = 0.006 and 0.03, respectively), a higher proportion of clinically improved KOOS pain in the non-anxiety group (P = 0.03), and the general health state in the anxiety and depression groups (P = 0.004 and 0.04, respectively).Conclusions All patients improved in outcome measures 1 year after TKA, regardless of presurgical psychological state. Patients with presurgical anxiety and/or depression benefit greatly from surgery and should not be discriminated against based on presurgical psychological distress, though this fact should not eliminate the preoperative psychological assessment of patients.Level of evidenceII.
... Responses were grouped to create categories of expectations which were subsequently used in the development of Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Expectation surveys for THR and TKR. These surveys have been used in other studies to assess both patient pre-operative expectations [10,[31][32][33][34][35] and fulfilment of expectations following surgery [9,10,33,[35][36][37]. The average percent of fulfilled expectations 1 year following surgery was 59% [9] for TKR and 72% [9] to 73% for THR [10]. ...
... Responses were grouped to create categories of expectations which were subsequently used in the development of Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Expectation surveys for THR and TKR. These surveys have been used in other studies to assess both patient pre-operative expectations [10,[31][32][33][34][35] and fulfilment of expectations following surgery [9,10,33,[35][36][37]. The average percent of fulfilled expectations 1 year following surgery was 59% [9] for TKR and 72% [9] to 73% for THR [10]. ...
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Purpose To assess (1) patient expectations before total hip (THR) and knee (TKR) replacement; (2) which expectations are met and unmet 6 and 12 months post-surgery; (3) the role of unmet expectations in satisfaction. Methods Questionnaires were mailed to consecutive patients following surgeon referral for primary THR or TKR. Patients listed their own expectations and also completed the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Expectation Survey. We used content analysis to group expectations into themes. At 6 and 12 months post-surgery, patients were given a copy of their own list of individual expectations and reassessed each one as met or unmet. We also assessed fulfilled HSS expectations and satisfaction with surgery. Results The sample of 556 patients (49% THR, 57% female) had a mean age of 64 years (SD10). The five most frequent expectation themes were pain relief, mobility, walking, physical activities, and daily activities. Of these, physical activities had the lowest percentage met 12 months post-surgery. 95% (THR) and 87% (TKR) were satisfied/very satisfied with their surgery 12 months post-surgery. Very satisfied patients had a significantly greater percentage of met expectations (96% THR; 92% TKR) than dissatisfied patients (42% THR; 12% TKR). Although most expectations listed by patients were included in the HSS surveys, some were not, particularly for TKR. From 6 to 12 months, there was a significant increase in patient satisfaction for self-care, daily activities, and met expectations for THR and pain relief, self-care, daily activities, and recreational activities for TKR. Conclusions Expectations should be explicitly addressed before surgery, including a discussion of realistic expectations, particularly for physical activities.
... Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is generally accepted as the definitive treatment for advanced knee arthritis after patients fail non-operative treatments [1]. Although surgical techniques and implant designs have improved, as evidenced by excellent survivorship and long-term results, no more than 80-55% of patients feel satisfied after undergoing TKA [2][3][4][5]. Recent changes in component geometry and modularity in posterior-stabilized (PS) designs have led to improved short-and long-term results [6][7][8] and permitted greater surgical flexibility in balancing during severe osteoarthritis cases with instability [9]. ...
Article
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Purpose Kinematically designed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) aims to restore normal kinematics by replicating the function of both cruciate ligaments. Traditional posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA designs, on the other hand, simplify knee kinematics and may improve TKA cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of patients who underwent primary TKA using either a traditional PS or kinematically designed TKA. Methods This retrospective study examined all patients who underwent primary TKA using either a kinematically or a traditional PS designed TKA implant, with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Patient demographics, complications, readmissions, revision rates and causes, range of motion (ROM) and patient reported outcomes (KOOS, JR) were compared between groups. Kaplan–Meier survivorship analysis was performed to estimate freedom from revision, and multivariate regression was performed to control for confounding variables. Results A total of 396 TKAs [173 (43.7%) with a kinematic design, 223 (56.3%) with a traditional design] with a mean follow-up of 3.48 ± 1.51 years underwent analysis. Revision rates did not differ between groups (9.8% vs. 6.7%, p = 0.418). In Kaplan–Meier analysis at 2-year follow-up, freedom from all-cause revision (96.4% vs. 93.1%, p = 0.139) were similar between groups. The two cohorts had no significant difference in aseptic loosening at 2 years (99.6% vs. 97.1, p = 0.050) and at latest follow up (92.7% vs. 96.4%, p = 0.279). KOOS, JR scores and post-operative ROM were similar between groups. Conclusion This study demonstrated similar mid-term outcomes following the use of both a kinematically designed and a traditionally designed implant in primary TKA patients. Level of evidence Retrospective study—III.
... With regard to the fulfillment of the preoperative expectations, Harmsen [15]) and Tilbury et al. [16] showed that almost 50% of THA/TKA patients had unfulfilled expectations of certain functional outcomes, but did not go into detail whether sex affected these expectations. Two other studies indicate that male sex is associated with higher fulfillment of expectations [17,18]. However, none of the studies specified the areas in which preoperative expectations or fulfillment differ between men and women. ...
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The influence of sex on preoperative expectations and their fulfillment following total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA) remains unexplored. We investigated differences between men and women in perceived preoperative expectations on the outcome of THA/TKA and their fulfillment 1 year postoperatively. We performed a cohort study. Expectations were collected preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively using the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip/Knee Replacement Expectations Surveys (HSS-HRES/KRES; not applicable = 0, applicable: back to normal = 1, much = 2/moderate = 3/slight improvement = 4). Fulfillment of expectations was calculated by subtracting preoperative from postoperative scores (score < 0:unfulfilled; score ≥ 0:fulfilled). We included patients with “applicable” expectations. Chi-square and ordinal regression were used to compare expectations and fulfillment regarding sex. 2333 THA (62% women) and 2398 TKA (65% women) patients were included. 77% of THA and 76% of TKA patients completed the HSS-HRES/HSS-KRES both preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Men more often perceived items as “applicable”, with differences in 9/20 (HSS-HRES) and 9/19 (HSS-KRES) preoperative items and, respectively, 12/20 (HSS-HRES) and 10/19 (HSS-KRES) postoperative items. The largest differences (> 10%) were found in sexual activity and working ability. 16/20 (HSS-HRES) and 14/19 (HSS-KRES) items showed an increased probability of having higher preoperative expectations of ≥ 10%, in favor of men. In all items, 60% of the respondents indicated that their expectation was fulfilled. Differences were observed in 16/20 (HSS-HRES) and 6/19 (HSS-KRES) items in favor of men. Sex differences were present in expectations and fulfillment, with higher applicability of items, preoperative expectations and fulfillment in men, especially on items related to functional activities. Trial registration: Trial-ID NTR3348.
... Among other factors (i.e. surgical or patient related factors), fulfillment of patients' expectations has been linked with post-operative satisfaction [20,28]. It is known, that patients tend to have overly optimistic pre-operative expectations in TKA [23], and that patients dissatisfied after TKA were most likely those who had unfulfilled expectations [4,8]. ...
Article
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Purpose: Post-operative outcome after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis correlates strongly with pre-operative impairment-driven patient treatment goals. However, a clinical tool for measuring patient treatment goals in correlation to impairments is still missing, which impedes patient-oriented indication in TKA. Methods: Patients scheduled for TKA were recruited in four German hospitals. All patients were handed the INDICATE Knee Score pre-operatively. The score contains 31 treatment goals with respective impairments, subdivided into seven categories. They were asked to rank all treatment goals and impairments on a 3-point scale. Treatment goals and impairments were then checked for frequency of occurrence. Correlation of goal and impairment was tested. Analysis for associations of treatment goals and different cohort characteristics (age, sex, BMI) was conducted. Results: 1.298 patients were included in the study. Seven treatment goals were categorised as "main goal" from more than 90% of all patients ("knee pain", "range of motion", "walking distance", "overall physical function", "climbing stairs", "quality of life", "implant survival"). Comparing age groups, there were significant associations towards higher expectations regarding working, physical and sports related treatment goals in younger patients (< 65y) ("ability to work" (P ≤ .001), "sports activities" (P ≤ .001), "sex life" (P ≤ .001), "dependence on help of others" (P = .015), "preventing secondary impairment" (P = .03), "dependence on walking aids" (P = .005)). Higher BMI resulted in increasing relevance of "weight reduction" (P ≤ .001), "climbing stairs" (P = .039) "global health status" (P = .015) and "long standing" (P = .007) as a "main goal". Analysis for differences in treatment goals regarding sex showed women choosing more treatment goals as "main goals" than men. Conclusion: Seven treatment goals which were expected by > 90% in our collective can be classified as general treatment goals for TKA. Demographic factors (age, sex, BMI) were significantly associated with patients' expectations for TKA. We conclude physicians should clearly assess their patients' demands prior to TKA to maximise post-operative outcome. Level of evidence: Prognostic Level III.
... Approximately 200,000 to 300,000 TKA are performed in China each year. Knee stiffness is one of the common complications after surgery, and its incidence is 5% to 7% [3][4][5]. ...
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Objective: To reduce the pain of quadriceps during knee flexion after total knee arthroplasty and increase range motion of knee flexion. Design: Three-month prospective before/after quality improvement project. Setting. Department of Bone and Joint Surgery. Participants. A total of 80 patients who met the surgical indications were admitted to the outpatient department for surgery. They were randomly grouped by computer in advance, and the patients were divided into two groups according to the time of admission, each with 40 cases. Intervention. The intervention group performed routine rehabilitation exercises and received quadriceps acupoint massages for 20 minutes twice a day for two consecutive weeks. The control group performed routine rehabilitation exercises, such as gentle quadriceps massage for 20 minutes twice a day for two consecutive weeks. Main Outcome Measures. PPT (pressure pain threshold) of quadriceps femoris/VAS (visual analog scale) of knee flexion and motion of knee flexion. Results: The VAS score, range of motion, and tenderness threshold during flexion were significantly better in the intervention group than in the control group at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after surgery. But the VAS score, range of motion, and tenderness threshold did not significantly differ between groups at 12 weeks after surgery. Conclusion: Acupoint massage of the quadriceps femoris can relieve early flexion pain in patients after total knee arthroplasty. The trial was registered at clinical trials.gov.
... Despite the known therapeutic effects, such as pain reduction [6,19], improvement of function [19][20][21] and health related quality of life [21][22][23], a subset of patients undergoing TKR does not benefit from the procedure as intended: (1) the proportion of patients with (residual) pain in the long-term course has been reported between 10 and 34 % [24], (2) residual symptoms and functional limitations between 33 and 54 % [25] and (3) the proportion of patients which are not satisfied has been reported recently still between 12 and 15 % [24,26]. It was shown that patients whose expectations were fulfilled were also more satisfied with the outcome than those whose expectations were not or only insufficiently fulfilled [27][28][29]. ...
Article
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Background Total knee replacement (TKR) is one of the most commonly performed routine procedures in the world. Prognostic studies indicate that the number of TKR will further increase constituting growing burden on healthcare systems. There is also substantial regional heterogeneity in TKR rates within and between countries. Despite the known therapeutic effects, a subset of patients undergoing TKR does not benefit from the procedure as intended. To improve the appropriateness of TKR indication, the EKIT initiative (“evidence and consensus based indication critera for total arthroplasty”) developed a clinical guideline for Germany on the indication of TKR. This guideline is the basis for a digital medical decision aid (EKIT tool) to facilitate shared decision making (SDM) in order to improve decision quality for elective surgery. The aim of this cluster randomized trial is to investigate the effectiveness of the EKIT tool on decision quality. Methods The Value-based TKR study is a prospective pragmatic multi-center, stepped wedge, cluster randomized controlled trial (SW-RCT). The EKIT tool provides (1) a systematic presentation of individual patient and disease-specific information (symptoms, expectations), (2) the fulfillment of the indication criteria and (3) health information about safety and effectiveness of TKR. All study sites will follow routine care as control clusters until the start of the intervention. In total, there will be 10 clusters (study sites) and 6 sequential steps over 16 month, with clusters receiving the intervention with a minimum 2 months of standard routine care. The primary outcome is patients’ decision quality measured with the Decision Quality Instrument (DQI)-Knee Osteoarthritis questionnaire. Furthermore, we will collect information on global patient satisfaction, patient reported outcome measures and the fulfilment of the individual expectations 12 months after SDM. The power calculation yielded an estimated power of 89% using robust Poisson regression under the following assumptions: 10 study sites with a total of N=1,080 patients (including a dropout rate of 11%), a 10% increase in decision quality due to the use of the EKIT tool, and a significance level of 5%. Discussion There is a high potential for transferring the intervention into routine practice if the evaluation is positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04837053 . Registered on 08/04/2021.
... This could not be investigated in detail in this study because a measured resection technique was used. However, patientspecific factors may have an even stronger correlation with functional results than intraoperative data which may be positively influenced by the use of a navigation system (alignment, ligament balance, range of motion) [35,36]. Finally, TKA is a very effective procedure in terms of functional improvement and improvement in health-related quality of life. ...
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Background Computer-assisted navigation (CAS) was developed to improve the surgical accuracy and precision. Many studies demonstrated better alignment in the coronal plane in CAS TKA compared to conventional technique. The influence on the functional outcome is still unclear. Only few studies report long-term results of CAS TKA. This study was initiated to investigate 10-year patient-reported outcome of CAS and conventional TKA. Methods From initially 80 patients of a randomized study of CAS and conventional TKA a total of 50 patients could be evaluated at the 10-year follow-up. The Knee Society Score and EuroQuol Questionnaire were assessed. For all patients a competing risk analysis for revision was performed. Results The patient-reported outcome measures demonstrated similar values for both groups. The 10-year risk for revision was 2.5% for conventional TKA and 7.5% for CAS TKA (p=0.237). Conclusions There was no difference between CAS and conventional TKA with regard to patient-reported outcome and revision risk ten years after surgery. Trial registration This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov on 11/30/2009, ID: NCT01022099 .
... Pre-operative function and patient age, underlying co-morbidities, psychiatric and social issues, as well as patient expectations all play a role in how a patient responds both physically and emotionally after TKA [4]. Previous studies have shown that fulfillment of patient expectations significantly impact satisfaction when measured 1-year post-operatively [10], but expectation fulfillment at 5 years post TKA does not impact satisfaction [11]. The impact of early-expectation fulfillment throughout recovery on 1-and 2-year outcomes, particularly in a highly controlled RAS TKA setting, has yet to be investigated. ...
Article
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Introduction The impact of fulfillment of patient expectations throughout recovery on satisfaction in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not well understood. Utilizing a standardized TKA method with a robotically assisted (RA) platform, we investigated the impact of expectation fulfillment at 3-month (M) and 6-M on 1-year (Y) and 2-Y satisfaction. We hypothesize that early fulfillment of patient expectations is associated with improved midterm patient satisfaction. We also compare improvements in outcomes with RA-TKA to those of a recent large national TKA cohort study to determine whether RA-TKA meets or exceeds the current standard of care. Materials and methods One hundred six patients were prospectively enrolled and underwent robotic-assisted TKA by a single surgeon using the OMNIBotics system. Patients completed KOOS and New Knee Society Score (KSS) preoperatively and at 3M, 6M, 1Y, and 2Y postoperatively. Expectation fulfillment was subdivided into patients who were below or above the average expectation score pre-operatively, or fulfillment of expectation score at 3M and 6M post TKA. The satisfaction of each group was then compared at 1Y and 2Y post TKA. Study cohort outcomes were compared to contemporary literature from the Function and Outcomes Research for Comparative Effectiveness in Total Joint Replacement (FORCE–TJR) database. Results Patients with greater than average KSS expectation fulfillment at 3M reported significantly higher KSS satisfaction scores at 1Y (34.9 ± 5.3 vs 30.6 ± 6.7, p = 0.0012), and patients with greater than average 6M expectation fulfillment reported improved satisfaction at 1Y (33.9 ± 5.9 vs 31.1 ± 6.7, p = 0.0330) and 2Y (35.2 ± 4.8 vs 32.4 ± 6.8, p = 0.0323). When compared to the FORCE-TJR database, no significant differences in post-operative KOOS outcomes were observed except for Sports and Recreation, for which the RAS group demonstrated higher scores (65.5 ± 30.0 vs 53.0 ± 27.1 p < 0.0001); however, the study cohort reported significantly greater improvements in KOOS Pain, Symptoms, Sports and Recreation, and Quality of Life at multiple time points up to 2 years post TKA. Conclusion High early-expectation fulfillment was associated with improved satisfaction at 1Y and 2Y, indicating the importance of managing patient-specific post-operative care to ensure patients reach their pre-operative goals. Greater improvements in all KOOS sub-scores and in absolute Sports and Recreation at 1Y and 2Y were observed in this robotic-assisted cohort compared to a large contemporary database, indicating that RAS meets or exceeds current standard of care benchmarks for patient-reported outcomes.
... Several other factors have been suggested to influence patient satisfaction, including the diagnosis, deformity, age, gender, surgical technique, postoperative pain control and rehabilitation, and lifestyle [26]. In the present study, male gender and bilateral TKA were significantly associated with patient satisfaction and quality of life after TKA. ...
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Background This study investigated whether achieving a higher degree of knee flexion after TKA promoted the ability to perform high-flexion activities, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life. Methods Clinical data on 912 consecutive primary TKA cases involving a single high-flexion posterior stabilized fixed-bearing prosthesis were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical data were collected, including knee flexion angle, the ability to perform high-flexion activities, and patient satisfaction and quality of life. Results Of the cases, 619 (68%) achieved > 130° of knee flexion after TKA (high flexion group). Knee flexion angle and clinical scores showed significant annual changes, with the maximum improvement seen at 5 years and slight deterioration observed at 10 years postoperatively. In the high flexion group, more than 50% of the patients could not kneel or squat, and 35% could not stand up from on the floor. Multivariate analysis revealed that > 130° of knee flexion, the ability to perform high-flexion activities (sitting cross-legged and standing up from the floor), male gender, and bilateral TKA were significantly associated with patient satisfaction after TKA, while the ability to perform high-flexion activities (sitting cross-legged and standing up from the floor), male gender, and bilateral TKA were significantly associated with patient quality of life after TKA. Conclusions High knee flexion angle (> 130°) after TKA increased the ease of high-flexion activities and patient satisfaction. The ease of high-flexion activities also increased quality of life after TKA in our Asian patients, who frequently engage in these activities in daily life.
... Fifth we did not evaluate mental health which has been reported to affect the patient satisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is multifactorial with some factors beyond the scope of a surgeon's control including preoperative patient reported function, narcotic use, mental health, expectation and lumber spine pain [46][47][48]. Further studies are needed to identify the preoperative and postoperative predictors of patient satisfaction following BCS TKA. ...
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Background One of the causes of dissatisfaction following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is abnormal knee kinematics. A newly designed bi-cruciate stabilized (BCS) TKA system has been developed to produce close-to-normal kinematics because of its anatomic tibiofemoral articular geometry and cam-post mechanism. Although BCS TKA is expected to improve patient satisfaction, no reports have described the appropriate technique or soft tissue handling required to achieve excellent satisfaction with BCS TKA. This study is to identify intraoperative surgical predictors of patient satisfaction after BCS TKA. Methods We studied 104 knees with primary varus knee osteoarthritis that underwent BCS TKA with a navigation system retrospectively. Surgical parameters including coronal, sagittal and axial alignment and joint laxity in each compartment that affected patient satisfaction was evaluated. Satisfaction score was evaluated with use of the 2011 Knee Society Scoring system. The multivariate regression analysis included age, gender, body mass index and intraoperative parameters that correlated with satisfaction scores in the univariate analysis ( P < 0.05). The current study focused on the patient satisfaction score at 1 year postoperatively and didn’t evaluate the long term clinical results nor survivorship. Results The postoperative satisfaction score was 28.6 ± 8.1. Multivariate analysis showed that medial joint laxity at 30° flexion ( P = 0.003), tibial excessive external rotation alignment ( P = 0,009) and tibial varus alignment ( P = 0.029) were predictors of poor satisfaction score. Conclusions When performing BCS TKA, surgeons should pay attention to maintaining proper stability of the medial compartment at mid flexion range and should avoid tibial varus and excessive external rotational alignment.
... For all individuals with advanced knee OA, this decision aid may better address patient expectations around symptom relief, improvement in physical function, and psychosocial wellness, as well as provide clarity around fears, attitudes, and the risks and benefits of surgery. 40,45,[48][49][50][51] Expectation management, patient engagement, and patient-perceived control over decisions synergistically yield optimal outcomes and experiences for those with OA. [52][53][54] Decision aids addressing patient preferences may equip teams of health professionals to align with these expectations. 55 Further, the ability of patients to appreciate multiple treatment options and the dynamic nature of their condition is supported by visual elements of our decision aid, including scales for preferences and quantified variability in outcomes based on modifiable personal and clinical factors. ...
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Importance: Decision aids can help inform appropriate selection of total knee replacement (TKR) for advanced knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, few decision aids combine patient education, preference assessment, and artificial intelligence (AI) using patient-reported outcome measurement data to generate personalized estimations of outcomes to augment shared decision-making (SDM). Objective: To assess the effect of an AI-enabled patient decision aid that includes education, preference assessment, and personalized outcome estimations (using patient-reported outcome measurements) on decision quality, patient experience, functional outcomes, and process-level outcomes among individuals with advanced knee OA considering TKR in comparison with education only. Design, setting, and participants: This randomized clinical trial at a single US academic orthopedic practice included 129 new adult patients presenting for OA-related knee pain from March 2019 to January 2020. Data were analyzed from April to May 2020. Intervention: Patients were randomized into a group that received a decision aid including patient education, preference assessment, and personalized outcome estimations (intervention group) or a group receiving educational material only (control group) alongside usual care. Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome was decision quality, measured using the Knee OA Decision Quality Instrument (K-DQI). Secondary outcomes were collaborative decision-making (assessed using the CollaboRATE survey), patient satisfaction with consultation (using a numerical rating scale), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Joint Replacement (KOOS JR) score, consultation time, TKR rate, and treatment concordance. Results: A total of 69 patients in the intervention group (46 [67%] women) and 60 patients in the control group (37 [62%] women) were included in the analysis. The intervention group showed better decisional quality (K-DQI mean difference, 20.0%; SE, 3.02; 95% CI, 14.2%-26.1%; P < .001), collaborative decision-making (CollaboRATE, 8 of 69 [12%] vs 28 of 60 [47%] patients below median; P < .001), satisfaction (numerical rating scale, 9 of 65 [14%] vs 19 of 58 [33%] patients below median; P = .01), and improved functional outcomes at 4 to 6 months (mean [SE] KOOS JR, 4.9 [2.24] points higher in intervention group; 95% CI, 0.8-9.0 points; P = .02). The intervention did not significantly affect consultation time (mean [SE] difference, 2.23 [2.18] minutes; P = .31), TKR rates (16 of 69 [23%] vs 7 of 60 [12%] patients; P = .11), or treatment concordance (58 of 69 [84%] vs 44 of 60 [73%] patients; P = .19). Conclusions and relevance: In this randomized clinical trial, an AI-enabled decision aid significantly improved decision quality, level of SDM, satisfaction, and physical limitations without significantly impacting consultation times, TKR rates, or treatment concordance in patients with knee OA considering TKR. Decision aids using a personalized, data-driven approach can enhance SDM in the management of knee OA. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03956004.
... Several other factors have been suggested to in uence patient satisfaction, including the diagnosis, deformity, age, gender, surgical technique, postoperative pain control and rehabilitation, and lifestyle [24]. In the present study, male gender and bilateral TKA were signi cantly associated with patient satisfaction and quality of life after TKA. ...
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Background: This study investigated whether achieving a higher degree of knee flexion after TKA promoted the ability to perform high-flexion activities, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life. Methods: Clinical data on 912 consecutive primary TKA cases involving a single high-flexion posterior stabilized fixed-bearing prosthesis were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical data were collected, including knee flexion angle, the ability to perform high-flexion activities, and patient satisfaction and quality of life. Results: Of the cases, 619 (68%) achieved > 130° of knee flexion after TKA (high flexion group). Knee flexion angle and clinical scores showed significant annual changes, with the maximum improvement seen at 5 years and slight deterioration observed at 10 years postoperatively. In the high flexion group, more than 50% of the patients could not kneel or squat, and 35% could not stand up from on the floor. Multivariate analysis revealed that > 130° of knee flexion, the ability to perform high-flexion activities (sitting cross-legged and standing up from the floor), male gender, and bilateral TKA were significantly associated with patient satisfaction after TKA, while the ability to perform high-flexion activities (sitting cross-legged and standing up from the floor), male gender, and bilateral TKA were significantly associated with patient quality of life after TKA. Conclusions: High flexion (> 130°) after TKA increased the ease of high-flexion activities and patient satisfaction. The ease of high-flexion activities also increased quality of life after TKA in our Asian patients, who frequently engage in these activities in daily life.
... Identifying patients at risk for less favorable outcomes (sustained pain or low physical function) is important to get realistic expectations of patients regarding the TKA surgery. This improves satisfaction after TKA [44]. Prognostic factors for outcome after TKA showed preoperative pain, preoperative physical function and anxiety as the best predictors for longterm outcome [20]. ...
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Background Recovery trajectories differ between individual patients and it is hypothesizes that they can be used to predict if an individual patient is likely to recover earlier or later. Primary aim of this study was to determine if it is possible to identify recovery trajectories for physical functioning and pain during the first six weeks in patients after TKA. Secondary aim was to explore the association of these trajectories with one-year outcomes. Methods Prospective cohort study of 218 patients with the following measurement time points: preoperative, and at three days, two weeks, six weeks, and one year post-surgery (no missings). Outcome measures were performance-based physical functioning (Timed Up and Go [TUG]), self-reported physical functioning (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living [KOOS-ADL]), and pain (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]). Latent Class Analysis was used to distinguish classes based on recovery trajectories over the first six weeks postoperatively. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify associations between classes and one year outcomes. Results TUG showed three classes: “gain group” ( n = 203), “moderate gain group” ( n = 8) and “slow gain group” ( n = 7), KOOS showed two classes: “gain group” ( n = 86) and “moderate gain group” ( n = 132), and VAS-pain three classes: “no/very little pain” ( n = 151), “normal decrease of pain” ( n = 48) and “sustained pain” ( n = 19). The” low gain group” scored 3.31 [95% CI 1.52, 5.09] seconds less on the TUG than the “moderate gain group” and the KOOS “gain group” scored 11.97 [95% CI 8.62, 15.33] points better than the “moderate gain group” after one year. Patients who had an early trajectory of “sustained pain” had less chance to become free of pain at one year than those who reported “no or little pain” (odds ratio 0.11 [95% CI 0.03,0.42]. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that different recovery trajectories can be detected. These recovery trajectories can distinguish outcome after one year.
... Auch jene Patienten mit einer ausgeprägten Adipositas (BMI > 35 kg/m 2 ) haben ein erhöhtes perioperatives Risikoprofil. Ein entscheidender Faktor ist auch die Erwartungshaltung des Patienten und seiner eigenen Einschätzung, welches Operationsergebnis er als erfolgreich bewertet [34,35,46,47]. ...
Article
Zusammenfassung Der primäre Hüft- und Kniegelenkersatz sind ein sehr häufig durchgeführtes und erfolgreiches Behandlungsverfahren bei fortgeschrittener Arthrose. Für moderne Hüft- und Knietotalendoprothesen wird über sehr gute Langzeitüberlebensraten berichtet. Vor dem Hintergrund steigender Aktivitätsansprüche und der zunehmend häufigeren Behandlung von Patienten mit schwererem Nebenerkrankungsprofil gewinnt die Analyse von patientenbezogenen Einflussfaktoren und Outcome-Kriterien weiterhin an Bedeutung. Mit der Etablierung interdisziplinärer Behandlungskonzepte zur rascheren Genesung und Komplikationsreduktion wird auf diese Entwicklung eingegangen. Bei einer Versorgung in zertifizierten Endoprothetikzentren (EndoCert©) sind standardisierte Behandlungspfade und die Vorhaltung spezialisierter Infrastruktur gewährleistet. In die Ergebnisbewertung gehen neben Routine-Indikatoren der externen Qualitätssicherung mittlerweile auch Daten aus dem Deutschen Endoprothesenregister (EPRD©) ein, das von der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Orthopädie und Orthopädische Chirurgie (DGOOC) etabliert wurde. Dieser Übersichtsbeitrag berichtet über die Versorgungssituation in der Hüft- und Knieendoprothetik bei Arthrose in Deutschland. Es wird auf Indikationsstellung, Prinzipien der Operationsmethodik, Implantatsysteme sowie aktuelle Entwicklungen und Behandlungskonzepte eingegangen.
Chapter
In order to determine the most important factors for achieving patient satisfaction and improving quality of life (QOL) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), validated scales must be used and influences of compounding factors must be accounted for such as comorbidities, mental and emotional problems, and pain in other joints. Although a variety of scales and questions have been used to rate patient satisfaction, few have been validated and there is tremendous variation in recent literature regarding this topic. Conversely, QOL instruments have well-documented psychometric properties and historically have been used throughout the orthopedic literature. Many factors have been shown to be predictive of patient satisfaction, including meeting patient preoperative expectations and postoperative function and pain relief as shown by scores on the Knee Society and Oxford Knee Society scales. Factors predictive of patient dissatisfaction include the presence of two or more comorbidities, female gender, depression, and low preoperative scores on the Medial Outcomes Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index instruments.
Chapter
Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is routinely performed in younger patients who desire to be active in fitness and recreational sports and enjoy the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. This chapter provides the most updated physical activity guidelines for adults from the American Heart Association. We performed an extensive literature review, and data are summarized from 21 studies that detailed recreational and sports activities patients participated in after TKA. This included types of activities, frequency of participation, and whether symptoms or limitations occurred for future patient counseling considerations. Details are provided for eight studies that used accelerometers to measure physical activity 6–12 months postoperatively, of which only three determined the percent of patients who achieved AHA recommended PA guidelines. Current recommendations for activities allowed after TKA from various orthopedic societies and a systematic review are included.
Chapter
This is the second of two chapters that detail our total knee arthroplasty (TKA) postoperative rehabilitation program, whose overall goal is to return patients to an active lifestyle to enhance their overall quality of life. Chapter 6 provides details for the first 12 postoperative weeks that restore sufficient muscle strength to allow pain-free activities of daily living as well as return to light work and low-impact aerobic activities such as walking, bicycling, and swimming. Because TKA is performed in many younger patients, the desire to return to recreational sports activities is important to these individuals. In our experience, additional strengthening and conditioning exercises are usually required in order to safely prepare them to participate in activities such as doubles tennis, light jogging, hiking, and skiing. Patients are counseled to perform these activities in a light or less strenuous manner to protect the knee joint and decrease the risk of prosthetic loosening that may occur with strenuous or higher-impact activities. The rehabilitation program is detailed here, along with precautions to avoid recurrent symptoms of knee pain and swelling that can prolong the course to complete recovery. Our return-to-recreational-sports criteria are provided, which include several objective tests to measure strength and function. Data are provided from our clinical studies to show the effectiveness of our program.
Article
The reported dissatisfaction rate after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) ranges between 15% and 25%. The purpose of this article is to perform a narrative review of the literature with the aim of answering the following question: What are the main factors contributing to patient dissatisfaction after TKA? A review of the literature was performed on patient satisfaction after TKA. The search engines used were MedLine (PubMed) and the Cochrane Library. The keywords used were "TKA" and "satisfaction". The main reported preoperative factors positively contributing to patient satisfaction were the following: fulfilment of preoperative expectations, preoperative complete joint space collapse, increasing patellar and lateral compartment osteophyte size, and TKA communication checklist. The principal preoperative factors negatively contributing to patient satisfaction included female sex, comorbidities, and Hispanic race. The chief perioperative factor positively contributing to patient satisfaction was cosmetic closure, whereas the fundamental perioperative factors negatively contributing to patient satisfaction included joint laxity, anterior tibial component slope, and greater femoral component valgus angle. The principal postoperative factors positively contributing to patient satisfaction were the following: ameliorated walking distance, improved range of motion, and improvements in pain. The most important postoperative factors negatively contributing to patient satisfaction included poor postoperative knee stability and soft-tissue balance, functional limitation, surgical complication and reoperation, staff or quality of care issues, and increased stiffness.
Article
Introduction The purpose of this study is to determine which patient factors predict two-year postoperative met expectations in a cohort of patients undergoing knee surgery. Additionally, this study aims to measure the association between met expectations and postoperative outcomes. Methods 319 patients undergoing knee surgery at one institution were studied. Patients completed patient-reported outcome questionnaires prior to surgery and again two years postoperatively. Preoperative Expectations and postoperative Met Expectations were measured using the Musculoskeletal Outcomes and Data Evaluation Management System (MODEMS) Expectations domain. Results The mean Met Expectations score was significantly lower than the preoperative Expectations Score. Worse two-year Met Expectations were associated with older age, higher BMI, greater comorbidities, more previous surgeries, black race, unemployment, lower income, government insurance, Worker's Compensation, smoking, and no injury prior to surgery. Greater Met Expectations were correlated with better scores on all two-year outcome measures as well as greater improvement on most outcome measures. Race, insurance status, function, mental health, and knee pain were found to be independent predictors of Met Expectations. Conclusion This study identified multiple patient factors and outcome measures that were associated with Met Expectations two years after knee surgery.
Article
Background Dissatisfaction after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a difficult problem. Patient characteristics and preoperative patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are potential predictors of satisfaction one year after TKA. Being able to predict the outcome preoperatively might reduce the number of less satisfied patients. Methods A retrospective cohort study on prospectively collected data of 1239 primary TKA patients (ASA I-II, BMI <35) was performed. Primary outcome was degree of patient satisfaction one year after TKA (NRS; 0-10). Secondary outcomes were degree of patient satisfaction six months and two years after TKA, and being dissatisfied (NRS 0-6) or satisfied (NRS 7-10) at all three time points. Multivariate linear and binary logistic regression analyses were executed with patient characteristics and preoperative PROs as potential predictors. Results One year after TKA, median NRS satisfaction score was 9.0 (8.0-10.0) and 1117 (90.2%) patients were satisfied. BMI, degree of medial cartilage damage, previous knee surgery, KOOS-PS score, EQ VAS score and anxiety were identified as predictors of the degree of patient satisfaction (p=0.000, R²=0.027). Models on secondary outcomes reported R² of 1.7%-7.1% (p<0.05). All models showed bad agreement between observed and predicted values for lower NRS satisfaction scores and being dissatisfied. Conclusion The degree of patient satisfaction and the chance of being dissatisfied or satisfied six months, one and two years after TKA are predictable by patient characteristics and preoperative PROs, but not at a reliability level that is clinically useful.
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BACKGROUND Although total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is efficacious treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis, ~20% patients are dissatisfied with the results. We determined which factors contribute to patient satisfaction and compared the various scoring systems before and after surgery.METHODS In this retrospective cohort study, 545 patients were enrolled and were evaluated preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Patient demographics, as well as scores for Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form (SF)-12, and 1989 Knee Society Clinical Rating System (KSS) were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. The possible predictors were introduced into a prediction model. Scores for overall satisfaction and 2011 Knee Society Score(KSS) were also assessed after total knee arthroplasty to identify the accuracy and agreement of the systems.RESULTSThere were 134 male patients and 411 female patients, with an overall prevalence of satisfaction of 83.7% 1 year after surgery. A history of surgery( p <0.001) , 1989 KSS and SF-12 were of the utmost importance in the prediction model, whereas the WOMAC score had a vital role postoperatively(change of WOMAC pain score, p <0.001; change of WOMAC physical function score, p <0.001; postoperative WOMAC pain score, p =0.004). The agreement between assessment of overall satisfaction and 2011 KSS satisfaction assessment was general(Kappa=0.437>0.4, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONA history of surgery, preoperative 1989 KSS and preoperative SF-12 influenced patient satisfaction after primary total knee arthroplasty. We recommend WOMAC (particularly the subscale score of pain) to reflect the overall patient satisfaction postoperatively.
Article
Background and objective Compliance with preoperative expectations of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is related to the degree of satisfaction, but its effect on other outcomes has not been studied. The aim of this study is to determine whether meeting expectations influences clinical, functional and quality of life outcomes at one year after surgery. Material and methods The expectations of 183 patients were evaluated through the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Replacement Expectations Survey. The Visual Analog Scale, Knee Society Score, WOMAC and SF-36 questionnaires were administered preoperatively and at the annual review. Comparisons were made between compliance with expectations and socio-demographic variables, postoperative complications, improvement in the questionnaires and degree of satisfaction. Results Patients without postoperative complications were significantly (p < 0.005) in the group that had fulfilled all their expectations. A statistically significant relationship (p < 0.001) was also observed between this group and a higher degree of satisfaction. Finally, the fulfillment of all expectations was associated with a greater improvement (p < 0.001) in the KSS-Function and SF-36 questionnaires. Conclusions Compliance with preoperative expectations is related to a greater improvement in functionality and quality of life at one year of the RTA and significantly affects satisfaction. These findings will allow us to adjust expectations to what is really expected from the surgery, in order to avoid poor results and dissatisfaction.
Article
Background: Various factors may affect differences between patient and surgeon expectations. This study aimed to assess associations between patient-reported physical and mental status, patient-surgeon communication, and musculoskeletal health literacy with differences in patient and surgeon expectations of foot and ankle surgery. Methods: Two hundred two patients scheduled to undergo foot or ankle surgery at an academic hospital were enrolled. Preoperatively, patients and surgeons completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Foot & Ankle Surgery Expectations Survey. Patients also completed Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) scores in Physical Function, Pain Interference, Pain Intensity, Depression, and Global Health. Patient-surgeon communication and musculoskeletal health literacy were assessed via the modified Patients' Perceived Involvement in Care Scale (PICS) and Literacy in Musculoskeletal Problems (LiMP) questionnaire, respectively. Results: Greater differences in patient and surgeon overall expectations scores were associated with worse scores in Physical Function (P = .003), Pain Interference (P = .001), Pain Intensity (P = .009), Global Physical Health (P < .001), and Depression (P = .009). A greater difference in the number of expectations between patients and surgeons was associated with all of the above (P ≤ .003) and with worse Global Mental Health (P = .003). Patient perceptions of higher surgeons' partnership building were associated with a greater number of patient than surgeon expectations (P = .017). There were no associations found between musculoskeletal health literacy and differences in expectations. Conclusion: Worse baseline patient physical and mental status and higher patient perceptions of provider partnership building were associated with higher patient than surgeon expectations. It may be beneficial for surgeons to set more realistic expectations with patients who have greater disability and in those whom they have stronger partnerships with. Further studies are warranted to understand how modifications in patient and surgeon interactions and patient health literacy affect agreement in expectations of foot and ankle surgery. Level of evidence: Level II, prospective comparative series.
Article
Background Aligning patient and surgeon expectations may improve patient satisfaction and outcomes. This study aimed to assess differences in expectations of foot and ankle surgery between patients and their surgeons. Methods Two hundred two patients scheduled to undergo foot or ankle surgery by one of 7 fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeons were enrolled. Preoperatively, patients and surgeons completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Foot & Ankle Surgery Expectations Survey independently. Differences between patient and surgeon overall expectations scores, number of expectations, and number of expectations with complete improvement expected were assessed. A difference of ≥10 points was considered a clinically important difference in expectations score. Associations between patient demographic and clinical characteristics, major/minor surgery, and individual surgeon with differences in expectations were also assessed. Results Overall, 66.3% of patients had higher expectations, 21.3% had concordant expectations, and 12.4% had lower expectations compared with their surgeons. On average, patients had higher expectations scores than their surgeons (70 ± 20 vs 52 ± 20 points, P < .001). Patients expected complete improvement in a greater number of expectations than surgeons (mean 11 ± 7 vs 1 ± 3, P < .001). Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for 18 of 23 items (78%). Items that had the greatest number of patients with higher expectations than surgeons were “improve confidence in foot/ankle,” “prevent foot/ankle from getting worse,” and “improve pain at rest.” Higher body mass index (BMI) ( P = .027) and individual surgeon ( P < .001) were associated with greater differences between patient-surgeon expectations. Major/minor surgery was not associated with differences in expectations ( P ≥ .142). Conclusion More than two-thirds of patients had significantly higher expectations than their surgeons. Higher BMI was associated with higher patient than surgeon expectations. These results emphasize the importance for foot and ankle surgeons to adequately educate patients preoperatively. Level of Evidence Level II, prospective comparative study.
Article
Background There is no consensus regarding participation in sports and recreational activities following total ankle replacement (TAR) and ankle arthrodesis (AA). This systematic review summarizes the evidence on return to sports and activity after operative management with either TAR or AA for ankle osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases was performed. Risk of bias of included studies was assessed using Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) criteria. Included studies reported sport and activity outcomes in patients undergoing TAR and AA, with primary outcomes being the percentage of sports participation and level of sports participation. Results Twelve studies met inclusion criteria for analysis. There were 1270 ankle procedures, of which 923 TAR and 347 AA were performed. The mean reported patient age was 59.2 years and the mean BMI was 28 kg/m ² . The mean follow-up was 43 months. Fifty-four percent of patients were active in sports preoperatively compared with 63.7% postoperatively. The mean preoperative activity participation rate was 41% in the TAR cohort, but it improved to 59% after TAR, whereas the preoperative activity participation rate of 73% was similar to the postoperative rate of 70% in the AA cohort. The most common sports in the TAR and AA groups were swimming, hiking, cycling, and skiing. Conclusion Participation in sports activity was nearly 10% improved after operative management of ankle OA with TAR and remains high after AA. The existing literature demonstrated a large improvement in pre- to postoperative activity levels after TAR, with minimal change in activity after AA; however, AA patients were more active at baseline. The most frequent postoperative sports activities after operative management of ankle OA were swimming, hiking, cycling, and skiing. Participation in high-impact sports such as tennis, soccer, and running was consistently limited after surgery. This review of the literature will allow patients and foot and ankle surgeons to set evidence-based goals and establish realistic expectations for postoperative physical activity after TAR and AA. Level of Evidence Level III, systematic review.
Article
Resumen Antecedentes y objetivo El cumplimiento de las expectativas preoperatorias de los pacientes sometidos a una artroplastia total de rodilla está relacionado con el grado de satisfacción, pero no se ha estudiado su efecto en el resto de resultados. El objetivo del presente estudio es determinar si el cumplimiento de las expectativas influye sobre los resultados clínicos, funcionales y de calidad de vida al año de la intervención. Material y métodos Las expectativas de 183 pacientes se evaluaron a través del Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Replacement Expectations Survey. Se administraron los cuestionarios Escala analógica visual, Knee Society Score, WOMAC y SF-36 de forma preoperatoria y en la revisión anual. Se establecieron comparaciones entre el cumplimiento de las expectativas y las variables sociodemográficas, las complicaciones postoperatorias, la mejoría en los cuestionarios y el grado de satisfacción. Resultados Los pacientes sin complicaciones postoperatorias se encontraron de forma significativa (p < 0,005) en el grupo que había cumplido todas sus expectativas. También se observó una relación estadísticamente significativa (p < 0,001) entre este grupo y un mayor grado de satisfacción. Por último, el cumplimiento de todas las expectativas se asoció con una mejoría mayor (p < 0,001) en los cuestionarios KSS-Función y SF-36. Conclusiones El cumplimiento de las expectativas preoperatorias se relaciona con una mayor mejora en la funcionalidad y la calidad de vida al año de la artroplastia total de rodilla, e incide significativamente sobre la satisfacción. Estos hallazgos permitirán ajustar las expectativas a lo realmente esperable de la cirugía, de manera que se eviten malos resultados e insatisfacción.
Article
Background: Patellofemoral Arthroplasty (PFA) has been shown to be successful in restoring knee function and quality of life in patients with isolated patellofemoral disease. Patient satisfaction has been suggested as an indicator of the quality of elective orthopedic operations, although there remains no standardized method to collect and evaluate satisfaction. The present study offers a systematic review of the available literature concerning patient satisfaction following PFA to assess common methodologies for reporting patient satisfaction. Methods: A query of the Medline database produced 116 articles that were reviewed for inclusion in the review. The following inclusion criteria were used to identify suitable articles: English language, clinical outcomes study related to PFA, and patient-reported satisfaction as an outcome measure. Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria and were eligible for review. The highest level of evidence was level-III. The study publication dates ranged from 2009-2016, with six published in 2015 & 2016. In total, 320 PFAs were performed on 267 patients. Four articles reported the proportion of included patients who had previous knee surgeries (range: 20%-60%). Three studies used ordinal scales to rate patient satisfaction. Four studies (57.1%) reported the numeric proportion of patients satisfied following PFA, which ranged from 76% to 96.5%. Two studies used Visual Analog Scale methods. For these two studies, one of them reported the mean satisfaction score as 7.5/10, and the other reported a median of 90/100. Conclusions: The available literature on patient satisfaction after PFA was found to be limited, with low-quality evidence and variable methodology.
Article
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AIM To evaluate the influence of the titanium nitride (TiN) coating on the results of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS A total of 910 patients (338 men; 572 woman), with a mean age of 65 (range 36-94) undergoing 1031 primary TKAs were assessed. Clinical evaluation and patient-reported outcomes were gathered one year after surgery. The questionnaires included the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)-Dutch version, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores in rest and during active knee movement, VAS-satisfaction scores, and EQ-5D-3L health scores. This was aimed to assess the overall knee function and patient satisfaction, and to enable us to make a gross comparison to other TKAs. RESULTS At a mean follow-up of 46 mo (range 1-92) the overall implant survival was 97.7% and 95.1% for any operative reason related to the implant. Twenty-three knees (2.2%) required revision surgery. Arthrofibrosis was the most common indication for a re-operation. The clinical evaluation and patient-reported outcomes revealed good to excellent patient satisfaction and function of the arthroplasty. The median postoperative VAS-pain scores on a scale of 0-100, at one year after surgery were 1 in rest and 2 during movement. CONCLUSION The TiN coated, mobile bearing TKA results are excellent and similar to those of other widely used TKA designs. Residual pain of the knee remains a concern and the TiN coating in combination with the mobile bearing does not seem to be the simple solution to this problem. Future research will have to show that the coating gives a better survival than the cobalt chrome version.
Article
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Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess the number and magnitude of preoperative expectations and to correlate them with the degree of satisfaction expressed one year after Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) or Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), in patients with severe and painful osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and methods: Preoperative expectations (within 20 days prior to surgery) and postoperative satisfaction (one year after the intervention) were measured using the previously validated French version of the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip or Knee Replacement Expectations Survey. Postoperative satisfaction was measured using a specific scale, following the same methodology as that used for the assessment of expectations. Prediction of the satisfaction of the patients was performed using multivariate linear regression modelling. Results: A total of 138 patients (80 THA and 58 TKA) completed the two parts of the study. The expectations score (mean ± SD) (range 0-100) was 72.58 ± 12.63 before THA and 69.10 ± 13.72 before TKA (p = 0.13). The number of expectations expressed was 14.34 ± 1.32 (out of a potential maximum of 18) before THA and 14.70 ± 2.29 (out of a potential maximum of 19) before TKA. After 1 year, THA generated a significantly higher degree of satisfaction compared to TKA (69.70 ± 14.46 v 60.44 ± 17.54, p<0.001) (range 0-100). The pre-operative expectations score was the single best positive predictor of the post-surgery satisfaction assessment both for TKA and THA. Conclusion: Patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty for end-stage OA have a high level of expectations, before both THA and TKA. While both types of interventions significantly improve essential and non-essential activities, the rate of satisfaction is significantly greater post THA. Preoperative expectations are a major contributor to the final degree of satisfaction, one year after surgery. These results re-emphasize the need for an optimal preoperative interaction between health care providers and patients, to allow patients a chance to foresee a reasonable outcome after TJA.
Article
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Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) designs continue to be modified to optimize patient's outcome. This study was designed to compare clinical and radiological results of classic worldwide used TKA posterior-stabilized (PS) design to those of its recent evolution. Methods A consecutive group of 100 patients undergoing TKA using a classic cemented fixed-bearing PS TKA system was matched by age, gender, body max index to 100 patients having the newer cemented fixed-bearing PS design, both by the same manufacturer. Patients were assessed preoperatively, at 12 months and at 24 months minimum follow-up (range, 24-46) in a standard prospective fashion. The outcome assessments used were the Oxford Knee Score, the Knee Society Score, range of motion, and a satisfaction survey. A 2-sample t test comparing the 2 groups was performed. Results No patients were lost at follow-up. At 2-year follow-up, differences in clinical and radiological Knee Society Score (P = .09), Oxford Score (P = .08), and overall satisfaction rate did not reach statistical significance. Implant group 2 showed a statistically significant decrease in postoperative anterior knee pain (P = .006). At final follow-up, 16% of group 1 knees achieved > 130° flexion compared with 37% in group 2 (P = .0009). There were 2 revisions for any reason in group 1 and none in group 2. Conclusions Design modifications applied to the newer TKA system allowed greater flexion and lower patellofemoral complications but did not appear to achieve better overall clinical scores.
Article
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Satisfaction is increasingly employed as an outcome measure for a successful total knee replacement (TKR). Satisfaction as an outcome measure encompasses many different intrinsic and extrinsic factors related to a person’s experience before and after TKR. The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Registry has previously demonstrated on a large population study that 17% of TKR recipients are not satisfied with their TKR outcome. This finding has been replicated in other countries. Similar significant factors emerged from these registry studies that are related to satisfaction. It would appear that satisfaction is better after more chronic diseases and whether the TKR results in pain relief or improved function. Importantly, unmet pre-operative expectations are a significant predictor for dissatisfaction following a TKR. It may be possible to improve rates by addressing the issues surrounding pain, function and expectation before embarking on surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B, Supple A:148–52.
Article
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Pre-operative variables are increasingly being used to determine eligibility for total knee replacement (TKR). This study was undertaken to evaluate the relationships, interactions and predictive capacity of variables available pre- and post-operatively on patient satisfaction following TKR. Using nationally collected patient reported outcome measures and data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales, we identified 22 798 patients who underwent TKR for osteoarthritis between August 2008 and September 2010. The ability of specific covariates to predict satisfaction was assessed using ordinal logistic regression and structural equational modelling. Only 4959 (22%) of 22 278 patients rated the results of their TKR as ‘excellent’, despite the majority (71%, n = 15 882) perceiving their knee symptoms to be much improved. The strongest predictors of satisfaction were post-operative variables. Satisfaction was significantly and positively related to the perception of symptom improvement (operative success) and the post-operative EuroQol-5D score. While also significant within the models pre-operative variables were less important and had a minimal influence upon post-operative satisfaction. The most robust predictions of satisfaction occurred only when both pre- and post-operative variables were considered together. These findings question the appropriateness of restricting access to care based on arbitrary pre-operative thresholds as these factors have little bearing on post-operative satisfaction. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:1359–65.
Article
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To investigate the factors which influence patient satisfaction with surgical services and to explore the relationship between overall satisfaction, satisfaction with specific facets of outcome and measured clinical outcomes (patient reported outcome measures (PROMs)). Prospective cohort study. Single National Health Service (NHS) teaching hospital. 4709 individuals undergoing primary lower limb joint replacement over a 4-year period (January 2006-December 2010). Overall patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes as measured by PROMs (Oxford Hip or Knee Score, SF-12), satisfaction with five specific aspects of surgical outcome, attitudes towards further surgery, length of hospital stay. Overall patient satisfaction was predicted by: (1) meeting preoperative expectations (OR 2.62 (95% CI 2.24 to 3.07)), (2) satisfaction with pain relief (2.40 (2.00 to 2.87)), (3) satisfaction with the hospital experience (1.7 (1.45 to 1.91)), (4) 12 months (1.08 (1.05 to 1.10)) and (5) preoperative (0.95 (0.93 to 0.97)) Oxford scores. These five factors contributed to a model able to correctly predict 97% of the variation in overall patient satisfaction response. The factors having greatest effect were the degree to which patient expectations were met and satisfaction with pain relief; the Oxford scores carried little weight in the algorithm. Various factors previously reported to influence clinical outcomes such as age, gender, comorbidities and length of postoperative hospital stay did not help explain variation in overall patient satisfaction. Three factors broadly determine the patient's overall satisfaction following lower limb joint arthroplasty; meeting preoperative expectations, achieving satisfactory pain relief, and a satisfactory hospital experience. Pain relief and expectations are managed by clinical teams; however, a fractured access to surgical services impacts on the patient's hospital experience which may reduce overall satisfaction. In the absence of complications, how we deliver healthcare may be of key importance along with the specifics of what we deliver, which has clear implications for units providing surgical services.
Article
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Patient expectations and their fulfilment are an important factor in determining patient-reported outcome and satisfaction of hip (THR) and knee replacement (TKR). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to examine the expectations of patients undergoing THR and TKR, and to identify differences in expectations, predictors of high expectations and the relationship between the fulfilment of expectations and patient-reported outcome measures. During the study period, patients who underwent 346 THRs and 323 TKRs completed an expectation questionnaire, Oxford score and Short-Form 12 (SF-12) score pre-operatively. At one year post-operatively, the Oxford score, SF-12, patient satisfaction and expectation fulfilment were assessed. Univariable and multivariable analysis were performed. Improvements in mobility and daytime pain were the most important expectations in both groups. Expectation level did not differ between THR and TKR. Poor Oxford score, younger age and male gender significantly predicted high pre-operative expectations (p < 0.001). The level of pre-operative expectation was not significantly associated with the fulfilment of expectations or outcome. THR better met the expectations identified as important by patients. TKR failed to meet expectations of kneeling, squatting and stair climbing. High fulfilment of expectation in both THR and TKR was significantly predicted by young age, greater improvements in Oxford score and high pre-operative mental health scores. The fulfilment of expectations was highly correlated with satisfaction.
Article
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The primary objective of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to decrease pain and restore functional knee joint. Current hypotheses indicate higher knee flexion is required in terms of life style, culture and expectations in Eastern communities. Therefore, society-specific features related to life style and cultural habits are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the expectations of patients undergoing TKA. The study included 131 patients (18 male, 113 female; mean age: 66.2 ± 8.3 years) who underwent cemented TKA due to knee osteoarthritis. All patients were operated by the same surgeon using the same implant and surgical technique. Patients were evaluated using the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score, a 15-item clinical knee assessment questionnaire and the HSS knee arthroplasty expectation questionnaire. Mean HSS score for the right knee was 89.2 ± 10.5 and for the left knee was 89.6 ± 9.4. The two most expected outcomes were improvements in pain (99.2%) and gait (96.2%) and the two least expected outcomes were improvements in psychological well-being (22.9%) and communicative skills (35.1%). Expectations were not affected by education and working conditions. Patients' most expected outcomes were improvement in pain and restoration of function (gait, climbing stairs and no need of assistive devices), similar to Western and American communities.
Article
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Up to 20% of patients are not satisfied with the outcome following total knee replacement (TKR). This study investigated the pre- and post-operative predictors of dissatisfaction in a large cohort of patients undergoing TKR. We assessed 1217 consecutive patients between 2006 and 2008 both before operation and six months after, using the Short-form (SF)-12 health questionnaire and the Oxford Knee Score. Detailed information concerning comorbidity was also gathered. Satisfaction was measured at one year when 18.6% (226 of 1217) of patients were unsure or dissatisfied with their replacement and 81.4% (911 of 1217) were satisfied or very satisfied. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of dissatisfaction. Significant (p < 0.001) predictors at one year included the pre-operative SF-12 mental component score, depression and pain in other joints, the six-month SF-12 score and poorer improvement in the pain element of the Oxford Knee Score. Patient expectations were highly correlated with satisfaction. Satisfaction following TKR is multifactorial. Managing the expectations and mental health of the patients may reduce dissatisfaction. However, the most significant predictor of dissatisfaction is a painful total knee replacement.
Article
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Numerous joint implant options of varying cost are available to the surgeon, but it is unclear whether more costly implants add value in terms of function or longevity. We evaluated registry survival of higher-cost "premium" knee and hip components compared to lower-priced standard components. Premium TKA components were defined as mobile-bearing designs, high-flexion designs, oxidized-zirconium designs, those including moderately crosslinked polyethylene inserts, or some combination. Premium THAs included ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and ceramic-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene designs. We compared 3462 standard TKAs to 2806 premium TKAs and 868 standard THAs to 1311 premium THAs using standard statistical methods. The cost of the premium implants was on average approximately $1000 higher than the standard implants. There was no difference in the cumulative revision rate at 7-8 years between premium and standard TKAs or THAs. In this time frame, premium implants did not demonstrate better survival than standard implants. Revision indications for TKA did not differ, and infection and instability remained contributors. Longer followup is necessary to demonstrate whether premium implants add value in younger patient groups. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Article
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After total knee arthroplasty (TKA) only 75-89% of patients are satisfied. Because patient satisfaction is a prime goal of all orthopaedic procedures, optimization of patient satisfaction is of major importance. Factors related to patient satisfaction after TKA have been explored, but no studies have included two potentially relevant factors, i.e. the functional capacity of daily activities and actual daily activity. This present prospective study examines whether functional capacity and actual daily activity (in addition to an extensive set of potential factors) contribute to patient satisfaction six months after TKA. A total of 44 patients were extensively examined preoperatively and six months post surgery. Functional capacity was measured with three capacity tests, focusing on walking, stair climbing, and chair rising. Actual daily activity was measured in the patient's home situation by means of a 48-hour measurement with an Activity Monitor. To establish which factors were related to patient satisfaction six months post surgery, logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios. Preoperative and postoperative functional capacity and actual daily activity had no relation with patient satisfaction. Preoperatively, only self-reported mental functioning was positively related to patient satisfaction. Postoperatively, based on multivariate analysis, only fulfilled expectations regarding pain and experienced pain six months post surgery were related to patient satisfaction. Functional capacity and actual daily activity do not contribute to patient satisfaction after TKA. Patients with a better preoperative self-reported mental functioning, and patients who experienced less pain and had fulfilled expectations regarding pain postoperatively, were more often satisfied.
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Unlabelled: Despite substantial advances in primary TKA, numerous studies using historic TKA implants suggest only 82% to 89% of primary TKA patients are satisfied. We reexamined this issue to determine if contemporary TKA implants might be associated with improved patient satisfaction. We performed a cross-sectional study of patient satisfaction after 1703 primary TKAs performed in the province of Ontario. Our data confirmed that approximately one in five (19%) primary TKA patients were not satisfied with the outcome. Satisfaction with pain relief varied from 72-86% and with function from 70-84% for specific activities of daily living. The strongest predictors of patient dissatisfaction after primary TKA were expectations not met (10.7x greater risk), a low 1-year WOMAC (2.5x greater risk), preoperative pain at rest (2.4x greater risk) and a postoperative complication requiring hospital readmission (1.9x greater risk). Level of evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
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Patient's expectations are variably reported to influence self-rated outcome and satisfaction after medical treatment; this prospective study examined which of the following was the most important unique determinant of global outcome/satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty (TKA): baseline expectations; fulfillment of expectations; or current symptoms and function. One hundred and twelve patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (age, 67 +/- 9 years) completed a questionnaire about their expectations regarding months until full recovery, pain, and limitations in everyday activities after TKA surgery. Two years postoperatively, they were asked what the reality was for each of these domains, and rated the global outcome and satisfaction with surgery. Multivariable regression analyses using forward conditional selection of variables (and controlling for age, gender, other joint problems) identified the most significant determinants of outcome. Patients significantly underestimated the time for full recovery (expected 4.7 +/- 2.8 months, recalled actual time, 6.1 +/- 3.7 months; P = 0.005). They were also overly optimistic about the likelihood of being pain-free (85% expected it, 43% were; P < 0.05) and of not being limited in usual activities (52% expected it, 20% were; P < 0.05). Global outcomes were 46.2% excellent, 41.3% good, 10.6% fair and 1.9% poor. In multivariable regression, expectations did not make a significant unique contribution to explaining the variance in outcome/satisfaction; together with other joint problems, knee pain and function at 2 years postoperation predicted global outcome, and knee pain at 2 years predicted satisfaction. In this group, preoperative expectations of TKA surgery were overly optimistic. The routine analysis of patient-orientated outcomes in practice should assist the surgeon to convey more realistic expectations to the patient during the preoperative consultation. In multivariable regression, expectations did not predict global outcome/satisfaction; the most important determinants were other joint problems and the patient's pain and functional status 2 years postoperatively.
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During a validation process of the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR), living registered patients were sent a questionnaire to ask if they had been reoperated on. This gave an opportunity to pose a simple four-point question with respect to patient satisfaction which 95% of patients answered. We analyzed the answers of patients operated on between 1981 and 1995 and found that only 8% of the patients were dissatisfied regarding their knee arthroplasty 2-17 years postoperatively. The satisfaction rate was constant, regardless of when the operation had been performed during the 15-year period. The proportion of satisfied patients was affected by the preoperative diagnosis, patients operated on for a long-standing disease more often being satisfied than those with a short disease-duration. There was no difference in proportions of satisfied patients, whether they had primarily been operated on with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or a medial unicompartmental arthroplasty (UKA). For TKAs performed with primary patellar resurfacing, there was a higher ratio of satisfied patients than for TKAs not resurfaced, but this increased ratio diminished with time passed since the primary operation. Unrevised knees had a higher proportion of satisfied patients than knees that had been subject to revision, and among patients revised for medial UKA, the proportion of satisfied patients was higher than among patients revised for TKA. We conclude that satisfaction after knee arthroplasty is stable and long-lasting in unrevised cases and that even after revision most patients are satisfied.
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To assess the growth of quality of life measures and to examine the availability of measures across specialties. Systematic searches of electronic databases to identify developmental and evaluative work relating to health outcome measures assessed by patients. Types of measures: disease or population specific, dimension specific, generic, individualised, and utility. Specialties in which measures have been developed and evaluated. 3921 reports that described the development and evaluation of patient assessed measures met the inclusion criteria. Of those that were classifiable, 1819 (46%) were disease or population specific, 865 (22%) were generic, 690 (18%) were dimension specific, 409 (10%) were utility, and 62 (1%) were individualised measures. During 1990-9 the number of new reports of development and evaluation rose from 144 to 650 per year. Reports of disease specific measures rose exponentially. Over 30% of evaluations were in cancer, rheumatology and musculoskeletal disorders, and older people's health. The generic measures--SF-36, sickness impact profile, and Nottingham health profile--accounted for 612 (16%) reports. In some specialties there are numerous measures of quality of life and little standardisation. Primary research through the concurrent evaluation of measures and secondary research through structured reviews of measures are prerequisites for standardisation. Recommendations for the selection of patient assessed measures of health outcome are needed.
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Unlabelled: Patients have multiple expectations of THA and TKA. We asked whether preoperative educational classes addressing recovery during the first year could modify patients' expectations of their 12-month postoperative recovery. Participants were enrolled consecutively in two randomized, controlled trials, one for THA (177 patients) and one for TKA (143 patients). Control patients preoperatively received a standard THA or TKA class addressing recovery immediately after surgery. Intervention patients preoperatively received the standard class plus a joint-specific module addressing recovery during the first 12 months. Before and after the class, patients completed either a hip-specific or knee-specific validated expectations survey. The main outcome was the within-patient change in expectation scores (maximum increase, +100; maximum decrease, -100) before and after the class but preoperatively. Mean changes in hip scores were +3.3+/-8 for intervention patients (range, -22+/-32) and +4.9+/-8 for control patients (range, -13+/-29). Mean changes in knee scores were -3.4+/-10 for intervention patients (range, -26+/-33) and +2.4+/-10 for control patients (range, -30+/-30). Patients' preoperative expectations of their recovery from THA or TKA can be modified by preoperative educational classes. Level of evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Article
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The aim of this study was to compare the preoperative patients' expectations with their postoperative satisfaction after arthroplasties of the hip and knee, using a visual analogue scale. The comparison was made in a group of 44 patients after 44 primary knee and hip joint arthroplasties. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used for the assessment of expectation and satisfaction. The mean preoperative expectation VAS was 14.8 (SD: 14.3). The mean patient satisfaction at time of follow up was 13.0 (SD : 21.1). We found no agreement in the preoperative patient's expectation satisfaction versus postoperative satisfaction (p = 0.66). Moreover in our study, the patients expected to be less satisfied than they actually were at follow-up, which is shown with the Bland and Altman method. It appears that patients are not capable of predicting the outcome of the joint arthroplasty, which could be influenced by negative preoperative information on complications and risks. Pain and functional disability are probably the most important factors for the patients' satisfaction after arthroplasty surgery.
Article
PurposeThe primary aim of the study was to examine stability and alignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) and conventional instrumentation (CI). The hypothesis was that stability and alignment would be better using PSI than CI, 12 months postoperatively. The secondary aim included the evaluation of clinical outcomes after TKA. Methods In this prospective randomized controlled trial, 42 patients with knee osteoarthritis received a Genesis II PS prosthesis with either PSI or CI. Patients visited the hospital preoperatively and postoperatively after 6 weeks and 3 and 12 months. To evaluate stability, varus–valgus laxity was determined in extension and flexion using stress radiographs 12 months postoperatively. Three months postoperatively, a long-leg radiograph and CT scan were obtained to measure hip–knee–ankle (HKA) alignment and component rotation. Furthermore, frontal and sagittal alignment of the components, the Knee Society Score, VAS Pain, VAS Satisfaction, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome score, Patella score (Kujala), University of California Los Angeles activity score, anterior–posterior laxity, (serious) adverse device-related events, and intraoperative complications were reported. The clinical outcomes were compared using independent t tests or non-parametric alternatives, and repeated measurements ANOVA with a significance level of p < 0.05. ResultsNo significant differences were found between the two groups regarding stability, HKA angle, and rotational alignment. In four patients, the PSI did not fit correctly on the tibia and/or femur requiring intraoperative modifications. Both groups improved significantly over time on all clinical outcomes, with no significant differences between the groups 12 months postoperatively. The PSI group showed less tibial slope than the patients in the CI group [PSI 2.6° versus CI 4.8° (p = 0.02)]. Finally, the PSI group more frequently received a thinner insert size than the CI group (p = 0.03). Conclusions Patients operated with PSI did not differ from CI in terms of stability and alignment. However, in the PSI group ligament releases were more often required intraoperatively. Furthermore, the two methods did not show different clinical results. It seems that the preoperative planning for the PSI facilitates more conservative bone cuts than CI, but whether this is clinically relevant should be investigated. Since PSI is more expensive and time consuming than CI, and does not outperform CI with regard to clinical results, we recommend to use CI. Level of evidenceI.
Article
Background: The relationship between patient expectations, patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and satisfaction in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients is not well understood. Methods: We prospectively evaluated patients who underwent primary TKA at 4 institutions. Demographics were collected. Preoperatively, patients completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Replacement Expectations Survey (HSS-KRES), SF-12, UCLA activity, and Knee Disability and Osteoarthritis Score. At 6 months and 1 year postoperatively, patients completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Replacement Fulfillment of Expectations Survey (HSS-KRFES), a satisfaction survey, and PROs. Step-wise multivariate regression models were created. Results: Eighty-three patients were enrolled. At 6 months and 1 year postoperatively, the follow-up rate was 84.3% and 92.7%, respectively. No demographics or preoperative PROs were predictive of HSS-KRES. Preoperative HSS-KRES did not predict postoperative satisfaction, but higher HSS-KRES predicted higher HSS-KRFES at 1 year, greater improvement in UCLA activity at 6 months and 1 year, and SF-12 Physical Composite Scale and Knee Disability and Osteoarthritis Score at 6 months. Higher HSS-KRFES predicted higher satisfaction at 6 months and 1 year. Conclusion: In TKA patients, preoperative expectations are not influenced by patient demographics or preoperative function. Higher preoperative expectations predict greater postoperative improvement in PROs and fulfillment of expectations. These findings highlight the importance of preoperative patient expectations on postoperative outcome.
Article
Hintergrund: Die Implantation einer Hüftendoprothese gehört zu den erfolgreichsten Operationen überhaupt. Die Erwartungen der Patienten beeinflussen das postoperative Ergebnis und die Mitarbeit im Rehabilitationsverlauf. Bisher ist kein deutschsprachiges Instrument zur standardisierten Abfrage der Patientenerwartungen verfügbar. Patienten: Im Rahmen dieser Studie wurden 193 Patienten des Dresdner Hüftregisters vor elektiver Implantation einer Hüftendoprothese zu ihren Erwartungen befragt. Es handelt sich dabei um 108 Frauen und 85 Männer. Das durchschnittliche Alter des Gesamtkollektivs betrug 59,7 Jahre mit einer Standardabweichung von 12,2 Jahren. Methoden: Im Rahmen der vorliegenden prospektiven Studie wurde eine Übersetzung und transkulturelle Adaptation des HSS-Erwartungsfragebogens (HSS: Hospital for Special Surgery) vorgenommen. Zur Validierung wurden zudem der soziodemografische Kerndatensatz nach RKI, der HADS-D, LOT-R und der SCL-(K-)9 erhoben. Auf Basis einer Hauptkomponentenfaktorenanalyse konnten die 4 Faktoren „Alltagsaktivitäten“, „Schmerzlinderung und Verbesserung der Funktion“, „Medikation und soziale Teilhabe“ sowie „Gangverbesserung“ identifiziert werden. Ergebnisse: Das Kollektiv zeichnet sich durch einen überwiegenden Anteil verheirateter Patienten aus. Bei den Frauen sind 20 % verwitwet. Insgesamt haben 20 % die Hochschulreife erreicht. Nahezu die Hälfte der Patienten ist berentet, etwa 30 % sind angestellt, 15,1 % der Männer sind selbstständig tätig und insgesamt 7,3 % der Patienten sind arbeitslos. Die Patienten erwarten für die meisten abgefragten Items eine große Verbesserung bis hin zur Rückkehr zum Normalzustand. Einzelne Items wie z. B. die Verbesserung der Berufstätigkeit wird sehr unterschiedlich beantwortet. Ebenfalls gibt es keine hohen Erwartungen an die Sportfähigkeit oder die sexuelle Aktivität. Die individuellen Erwartungen unterscheiden sich relevant von den Durchschnittswerten des Gesamtkollektivs. In den 4 Hauptfaktoren ergeben sich höhere Erwartungen bei Männern im Vergleich zu Frauen im Bereich „Medikation und soziale Teilhabe“ sowie bei der Gangverbesserung. Ältere Patienten (Alter > 60 Jahre) haben niedrigere Erwartungen in den Bereichen „Alltagsaktivitäten“, „Medikation und soziale Teilhabe“ und bei der Gangverbesserung. Schlussfolgerung: Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die Validierung der deutschen Version des HSS-Erwartungsfragebogens erfolgt. Der Bogen kann im Rahmen der Operationsvorbereitung eingesetzt werden und gibt dem Arzt einen raschen Überblick über die Erwartungen der Patienten.
Article
Background: Improved knee kinematics is one of the major goals to obtain better satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty. This study examined whether a guided motion knee design improves functional outcome and satisfaction as compared to a conventional design. Methods: In a retrospective manner, from January 2005 to December 2008, patients with two different kinematic TKA designs were enrolled. The 150 patients were divided into two groups: guided motion group (77) with kinematic design (Journey) and control group (73) with no kinematic design (LCS). All the patients had the same surgical technique and postoperative protocols. The functional and radiographic results were interpreted with the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score and WOMAC score. Results: After a mean follow-up of 84.2months, the guided motion group had higher mean postoperative range of motion (p=0.022), functional status in the WOMAC function subscale (p=0.002), but had higher residual pain in the WOMAC pain subscale (p=0.018 and p=0.013) and higher iliotibial band syndrome incidence (6.6% vs 0%; p=0.02). There were no significant differences in HSS score between the two groups. No differences were seen between groups in patient satisfaction in the WOMAC total score (p=0.46) and survival rate. Conclusion: The guided motion design can improve functional status according to WOMAC but not to HSS knee scores. Poorer pain scores and no higher patient satisfaction were observed with this kinematic design.
Article
Background: The aim of this study was to carry out an in-depth assessment of patient expectations before surgery in a representative sample of the Scottish population undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty and also assess the influence of demographic factors and preoperative functions on expectations. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 200 patients treated in our institution from November 2011 to July 2013. Patients received standard preoperative preparation including consultation with a surgeon, an information booklet and a DVD. Patients completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Replacement Expectation Survey along with the EuroQol EQ-5D-3L health questionnaire on the day of admission. Results: Fifty-nine percent of the cohort were women, mean age 67.7 years (45-84 years), mean body mass index 32.5 (21-50), mean preoperative Oxford Knee Score 17 (1-44). Relief of pain and improved ability to walk were the most important expectations, followed by the ability to use public transport and/or drive, ability to change position, ability to walk down stairs, and the ability to carry out routine daily activities and/or chores. Some expectations were unrealistic. No relationships between expectations and demographics, including preoperative function, were found. Conclusion: This study suggests that patients have very high and sometimes unrealistic expectations regarding their improvements after total knee arthroplasty even after detailed preoperative consultation and education. In addition, these expectations cover a wide range of dimensions. We suggest that to effectively manage patients' expectations, it is important to assess each patient individually and reinforce what expectations can realistically be achieved.
Article
Objectives: To assess the growth of quality of life measures and to examine the availability of measures across specialties. Design: Systematic searches of electronic databases to identify developmental and evaluative work relating to health outcome measures assessed by patients. Main outcome measures: Types of measures: disease or population specific, dimension specific, generic, individualised, and utility. Specialties in which measures have been developed and evaluated. Results: 3921 reports that described the development and evaluation of patient assessed measures met the inclusion criteria. Of those that were classifiable, 1819 (46%) were disease or population specific, 865 (22%) were generic, 690 (18%) were dimension specific, 409 (10%) were utility, and 62 (1%) were individualised measures. During 1990-9 the number of new reports of development and evaluation rose from 144 to 650 per year. Reports of disease specific measures rose exponentially. Over 30% of evaluations were in cancer, rheumatology and musculoskeletal disorders, and older people's health. The generic measures—SF-36, sickness impact profile, and Nottingham health profile—accounted for 612 (16%) reports. Conclusions: In some specialties there are numerous measures of quality of life and little standardisation. Primary research through the concurrent evaluation of measures and secondary research through structured reviews of measures are prerequisites for standardisation. Recommendations for the selection of patient assessed measures of health outcome are needed.
Article
Background Although the volume of total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) performed in the United States continues to increase, recent reports have shown the percentage of patients who remain “unsatisfied” is as high as 15% to 30%. Recently, several newer implant designs have been developed to potentially improve patient outcomes. Questions/purposes The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of high-flex, gender-specific, and rotating-platform TKA designs on patient satisfaction and functional outcomes. Methods A four-center study was designed to quantify the degree of residual symptoms and functional deficits in patients undergoing TKA with newer implant designs compared with a 10-year-old, cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA system introduced in 2003. Each contributing surgeon was fellowship-trained and specialized in joint replacement surgery. Only patients younger than 60 years old were included. Data were collected by an independent, third-party survey center blinded to the implant type, who administered questionnaires about patient satisfaction, residual symptoms, function, and pre- and postoperative activity levels using previously published survey instruments. Two hundred thirty-seven CR, 137 rotating-platform, 88 gender-specific, and 65 high-flex TKAs were included in the analysis. Differences in baseline demographic variables were accounted for using multiple logistic regression statistical analyses. Results Patients who received certain newer designs reported more residual symptoms (grinding, popping, and clicking) in the 30 days before survey administration than the group receiving a 10-year-old CR design (CR, 24% [57 of 237 patients] versus gender-specific, 36% [32 of 88 patients]; odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.8; p = 0.03; and rotating-platform, 43% [59 of 137 patients]; OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.3–3.7; p
Article
Improvement in knee flexion is a major expectation for many patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred and twenty two patients were randomized to receive a cruciate-retaining standard or high-flexion TKA. Range of motion (ROM) and functional outcomes were assessed. The high flexion implants had a greater intraoperative ROM than standard implants. The mean flexion preoperatively, intraoperatively and at the one year follow-up was 107.4°, 123.0° and 108.9° in the standard group and 109.9°, 129.1° and 109.7° in the high-flexion TKA group. These differences were not significant preoperatively and at follow-up, but intraoperatively (P<0.001). In multivariate analysis preoperative knee flexion was the only significant factor influencing knee flexion at follow-up. No differences in the Knee Society Score or SF 36 were observed.
Article
Factors other than surgical technique and implants impact patient outcomes following a total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of psychopathology on the rate of improvement following total knee arthroplasty in an indigent population. One hundred and fifty-four consecutive indigent patients undergoing a primary total knee arthroplasty for arthritis were enrolled and available for follow-up. Patients were classified as having psychopathology on the basis of the presence of somatization, depression, and/or a panic or anxiety disorder as assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire. Outcome measures were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively. Univariate analyses, controlled for sex and age, were used to compare the rates of improvement in patients who exhibited psychopathology with the rates in those without psychopathology. Fifty-four patients (35%) were diagnosed with at least one Axis-I psychological disorder. The psychopathology group showed significantly lower Short Form-36 mental component summary scores both at baseline and one year postoperatively (p < 0.001 for both). The psychopathology group also reported significantly higher levels of perceived disability at baseline on the Pain Disability Questionnaire (p < 0.001) and worse scores on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (p = 0.004); however, the improvement on both of these scales did not differ significantly between the two groups (p > 0.05). The Knee Society Score differed significantly between the two groups at both baseline and the one-year follow-up evaluation (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively), but there was no significant difference in the total rate of improvement between the two comparison groups (p > 0.05). Not only is there a high prevalence of psychopathology in the indigent population, but psychopathology may result in lower patient-perceived outcome scores at one year after a total knee arthroplasty. Even though outcome scores may be worse for patients with psychopathology, our study showed that these patients still benefit, with the same degree of improvement in function.
Article
Although there have been many studies focusing on the increasingly important assessment of patients' satisfaction, few studies have specifically addressed this issue for total hip arthroplasty (THA). The goals of this study were to measure patients' satisfaction with THA and to evaluate the relationships of expectations and outcome to patients' satisfaction. A total of 180 patients were surveyed 2 to 3 years after THA about their experiences with THA. Patients cited 45 different expectations, which were grouped into five categories reflecting improvement in pain, walking, psychological state, essential activities, and nonessential activities. Overall, 89% of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery. Lower rates of satisfaction were found in patients who had a better preoperative condition (as measured by the surgeons with The Hospital for Special Surgery Hip Scale), in patients who expected improvement in nonessential activities, and in patients who reported worse postoperative condition (as measured by self-assessment with the Hip Rating Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-form General Health Survey). Patients were also asked how they came to THA. Nearly 50% of patients were first referred to an orthopaedist by family or friends or based on their own knowledge. Seventy-four percent either had subsequently referred others for THA or would have done so if they knew someone with hip pain. This study demonstrates that satisfaction with THA is a complex phenomenon, affected by expectations, outcome, and what patients know about the procedure from their community network. A better understanding of THA satisfaction will enable better future selection of patients and an additional dimension of outcome, both of which are important to patients and payers.
Article
To explore the relationship between preoperative patient expectations and postoperative health status in patients undergoing joint replacement surgery, with particular emphasis on the types of expectations held by patients. Respondents completed the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Hip/Knee Replacement Expectations Questionnaires pre-surgery, in addition to the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC™) and the Short-Form 36-Item (SF-36) Health Survey and the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale. The WOMAC™ Index and SF-36 were also completed 3 and 6 months post-surgery. A total of 106 patients (total hip replacement [THR] = 28; total knee replacement [TKR] = 78) completed questionnaires. No differences were seen in overall expectations between males and females or older or younger patients, although some differences between the age groups were seen for individual expectations on the HSS expectations questionnaires. For THR, a higher rating of the importance of expectations was correlated with a lesser improvement in pain from pre-surgery to 3 months post-surgery, whereas for TKR, a higher rating of expectations was associated with a greater improvement in function to 6 months post-surgery. Patients have high expectations of surgery, which are correlated with post-surgery pain and function. Identifying the broad range of expectations may be helpful in preparation for surgery and gaining greater satisfaction with outcomes.
Article
There is a well-known difference between patients expectation, satisfaction and the measured clinical outcome in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It has been hypothesized that higher expectation prior to surgery and higher satisfaction will show better clinical outcome according to well-established scoring systems, frequently used for assessment after TKA. A consecutive group of 102 patients was included who received TKA for degenerative osteoarthritis. A modified patients expectation form was used prior and 8 months after surgery. Furthermore, the KSS, WOMAC and SF-36 served for patient assessment. Patients were grouped in responder and non-responder according to their level of expectation and fulfilment of expectation after surgery using a Likert scale. A total of 54 patients (53%) showed expectation prior to surgery of 1 or 2 and a satisfaction after surgery of 1 or 2 according to the Likert scales. These patients were classified as responders. Considering the continuous parameters of KSS, SF-36 and WOMAC, a few statistically significant differences were found between the responders and non-responders at baseline (pre-surgery) and at the fulfilment of their expectation after surgery. Patient expectation prior to surgery did not differ between both groups. The more satisfied patients showed significant better results in the KSS, WOMAC and SF-36 after surgery. The parameters general health (SF-36) and role emotional (SF-36) measured prior to surgery dominate the predictive potential to get a responder with sensitivity of 74%, specificity of 81% and a rate of correct classification of 78%. This study has shown that patient satisfaction correlates well with the clinical outcome according to the KSS, WOMAC and SF-36. The indication for TKA should consider the general health, emotional role and knee function of the patients as well in order to predict patient's outcome.
Article
We aimed to document the pre-operative expectations in Korean patients undergoing total knee replacement using an established survey form and to determine whether expectations were influenced by sociodemographic factors or pre-operative functional status. Expectations regarding 17 items in the Knee Replacement Expectation Survey form were investigated in 454 patients scheduled for total knee replacement. The levels and distribution patterns of summated expectation and of five expectation categories (relief from pain, baseline activity, high flexion activity, social activity and psychological well-being) constructed from the 17 items were assessed. Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression were performed to examine the associations of expectations with the sociodemographic factors and the functional status. The top three expectations were relief from pain, restoration of walking ability, and psychological well-being. Of the five expectation categories, relief from pain was ranked the highest, followed by psychological well-being, restoration of baseline activity, ability to perform high flexion activities and ability to participate in social activities. An age of < 65 years, being employed, a high Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index function score and a low Short-form 36 social score were found to be significantly associated with higher overall expectations.
Article
This study examined the effect of patient attributes on expectations before total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 1943 patients completed an Expectations Survey before TKA. Demographics, surgical history, baseline Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Lower Extremity Activity Scale score were obtained. On univariate analysis, expectations (mean score, 77.6) correlated with SF-36 General Health, age, SF-36 Vitality, KOOS Quality-of-Life, and Lower Extremity Activity Scale. Living alone and history of joint arthroplasty were associated with significantly lower expectations, whereas male sex and white race were associated with higher expectations. On multivariate regression analysis, age, living situation, history of joint arthroplasty, SF-36 General Health, and KOOS Quality-of-Life remained significant predictors of expectations. Our results suggest that high, possibly unrealistic, expectations of TKA are common and should be moderated to maintain patient satisfaction.
Article
Patient psychological factors have been linked to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes after total joint replacement (TJR). We evaluated the relationship between patient expectations before TJR, their fulfillment and HRQoL outcomes at 3 and 12 months after surgery. Consecutive patients preparing for TJR of the knee or hip due to primary osteoarthritis in 15 hospitals in Spain were recruited for the study. Patients completed questionnaires before surgery, and 3 and 12 months afterward: five questions about expectations before surgery and their fulfillment at 3 and 12 months; three HRQoL instruments-Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form 12 (SF-12), and European Quality of Life Instrument (EQ-5D); as well as questions about sociodemographic information. Student's t test was used to assess the relationship between fulfillment of expectations and gains in HRQoL. A total of 881 patients took part in the study. Preintervention expectations for TJR ranged from 85% to 86% of patients, with high expectations for pain relief and ability to walk to 70% with high expectations about interacting with others. Patients who reported having fulfilled their expectations at 3 and 12 months had significantly greater gains in HRQoL than those who did not. Besides, we observed a statistically significant improvement in the percentage of patients who fulfill their expectations from 3 to 12 months. Patients have high expectations for the benefits of TJR, and those who fulfill their expectations have greater gains in HRQoL assessing by SF-12, WOMAC and EQ-5D. Health-care providers should help their patients develop realistic expectations about the impact of TJR.
Article
Fulfillment of patient expectations is an important outcome of total hip arthroplasty. The objective of the present study was to determine the proportion of expectations that were fulfilled following total hip arthroplasty as well as how the fulfillment of expectations relates to patient and clinical characteristics. Preoperatively, patients completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip Replacement Expectations Survey, measuring physical and psychological expectations, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Lower Limb Core Scale, measuring symptoms and function. Approximately four years after surgery, patients were interviewed by telephone and were asked whether each expectation that they had cited preoperatively had been fulfilled. Four hundred and five patients were interviewed. The mean age of the patients was sixty-six years, and 58% of the patients were women. Forty-three percent of the patients reported that all of their expectations had been fulfilled completely. For the entire sample, the mean proportion of expectations that had been fulfilled completely was 87%. Patients who were younger, who were employed, who had a body mass index of <35 kg/m(2), who did not have complications, who did not have a postoperative limp, and who had better preoperative and postoperative Lower Limb Core scores had a greater proportion of expectations fulfilled (p <or= 0.05). A better postoperative Lower Limb Core score was most closely associated with the fulfillment of expectations following total hip arthroplasty. Not having a postoperative limp was independent of the postoperative Lower Limb Core score, indicating that the impact of a limp is greater than its manifestation as a physical disability. Better preoperative status also was an independent predictor, indicating that patient expectations are more likely to be fulfilled if the patient is not the most severely impaired at the time of surgery.
Article
With an aging population expecting an active life after retirement, patients' expectations of improvement after surgery are also increasing. We analyzed the relationship between preoperative expectations and postoperative satisfaction and self-reported outcomes with regard to pain and physical function after knee arthroplasty. 102 patients (39 men) with knee osteoarthritis and who were assigned for TKR (mean age 71 (51-86) years) were investigated with KOOS, SF-36, and additional questions concerning physical activity level, expectations, satisfaction, and relevance of the outcome to the patient. These investigations took place preoperatively and postoperatively after 6 months, 1 year, and 5 years of follow-up. Response rate at 5 years was 86%. In general, the patients' preoperative expectations were higher than their postoperative ability. For example, 41% expected to be able to perform activities such as golfing and dancing while only 14% were capable of these activities at 5 years. Having high or low preoperative expectations with regard to walking ability or leisure-time activities had no influence on the KOOS scores postoperatively. 93% of the patients were generally satisfied 5 years postoperatively, while 87% were satisfied with the relief of pain and 80% with their improvement in physical function at that time. With an expanding population of mentally alert elderly, we can expect that great demands will be put on joint replacements. This study shows that patients have high preoperative expectations concerning reduction of pain. To a considerable extent, these expectations are fulfilled after one year. Expectations concerning demanding physical activities are not fulfilled to the same degree; however, most patients reported general satisfaction with the outcome indicating that satisfaction is not equivalent to fulfilled expectations. Preoperative counseling should include realistic information on outcomes concerning physical function and pain relief.
Article
A new total knee rating system has been developed by The Knee Society to provide an up-to-date more stringent evaluation form. The system is subdivided into a knee score that rates only the knee joint itself and a functional score that rates the patient's ability to walk and climb stairs. The dual rating system eliminates the problem of declining knee scores associated with patient infirmity.
Article
Patients' expectations of medical care are linked to their requests for treatment and to their assessments of outcome and satisfaction. Our goals were to measure patients" preoperative expectations of knee surgery and to develop and test patient-derived knee expectations surveys. An initial sample of 377 patients (mean age, 54.6 18.2 years; 52% women) was enrolled in the survey-development phase. One hundred and sixty-one (43%) of these patients subsequently underwent total knee arthroplasty; seventy-five (20%), cruciate ligament repair; eighty-five (23%), meniscal surgery; and fifty-six (15%), surgery for another knee condition. Preoperatively, these patients were asked open-ended questions about their expectations of knee surgery. Their responses were grouped with use of qualitative research techniques to generate categories of expectations. Categories were transformed into specific questions and were formatted into two draft surveys, one for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and one for patients undergoing other surgical procedures on the knee. A second sample of 163 patients (mean age, 55.1 17.5 years; 49% women) was enrolled in the survey-testing phase, and they completed the draft surveys on two separate occasions to establish test-retest reliability. Items were selected for the final surveys if they were cited by 5% of the patients, if they represented important functional changes resulting from surgery, or if they represented potentially unrealistic expectations. All selected items fulfilled reliability criteria, defined as a kappa (or weighted kappa) value of 0.4, or were deemed to be clinically relevant by a panel of orthopaedic surgeons. From the survey-development phase, a total of fifty-two categories of expectations were discerned; they included both anticipated items such as pain relief and improvement in walking ability and unanticipated items such as improving psychological well-being. Expectations varied by diagnosis and patient characteristics, including functional status. Two final surveys were generated: the seventeen-item Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Replacement Expectations Survey and the twenty-item Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Surgery Expectations Survey. Each required less than five minutes to complete. Patients have multiple expectations of knee surgery in the areas of symptom relief and improvement of physical and psychosocial function, and these expectations vary according to the diagnosis. We developed two valid and reliable surveys that can be used preoperatively to direct patient education and shared decision-making and to provide a framework for setting reasonable goals. Reexamining patients' responses postoperatively could provide a way to assess fulfillment of expectations, which is a crucial patient-derived measure of outcome and satisfaction.
Article
We used a visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in a group of 108 patients (126 TKAs) with short-term to medium-term follow-up. We also used the Knee Society scoring system, Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), pain VAS, and survival analysis. A comparison between the subjective and objective outcome systems revealed only poor correlations. This comparison suggests that the concerns and priorities of patients and surgeons differ. The outcome assessed with the satisfaction VAS revealed a significantly better subjective outcome in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared with osteoarthritis patients, whereas Knee Society scores were not different. The satisfaction VAS provides additional information about subjective outcome after TKA.
Article
Recent reports indicate that patients' expectations should be assessed as part of routine practice before total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 1,103 THA patients preoperatively completed the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey, an 18-item scale tested for validity and reliability. Patients also completed measures of hip-specific function (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Hip/Knee Module), and overall physical function (SF-36). Patients with worse preoperative function had higher expectations of THA and were more likely to rate their expectations as very important compared with patients with better function. In multivariate analysis, older patients, men, and those with worse functional status (both hip-specific and overall physical function) had more expectations of THA. Identifying and addressing expectations, particularly possibly unrealistic expectations, are important elements in discussions with patients before THA.
Article
Total knee arthroplasty is an effective treatment for severe osteoarthritis of the knee. Our aim was to determine whether patients from the United Kingdom, United States, and Australia have different preoperative expectations regarding total knee arthroplasty and whether these expectations have an impact on outcomes and patient satisfaction. Patients from the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia were recruited into a prospective observational study of primary total knee arthroplasty for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Preoperative expectations, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, and demographic, socioeconomic, and follow-up data, including satisfaction with outcome, were obtained from self-administered patient questionnaires. A total of 598 patients with a mean age of sixty-nine years at the time of the index arthroplasty were recruited; 58% were women. The majority of patients expected to have no pain at twelve months after the surgery, and with the numbers available there was no significant difference among the countries with regard to pain expectations. Australian patients were more likely than patients in the United Kingdom or the United States to expect better function at twelve months after the surgery. With the numbers available, satisfaction scores at twelve months did not differ significantly among the countries and were not influenced by preoperative expectations. Australian patients were more likely than patients in the United Kingdom or the United States to be unwilling to undergo total knee arthroplasty again at twelve months under similar circumstances. Patients from different countries have different expectations regarding total knee arthroplasty, which are not fully explained by differences in sociodemographic factors, clinical characteristics, and pain and functional status. Australian patients had the highest expectations but, despite reporting similar outcomes and satisfaction following total knee arthroplasty, they were more likely not to want to have the surgery again under similar circumstances.
Article
Although total joint replacement is an effective treatment for advanced arthritis, many whom might benefit are unwilling to consider this procedure. This review highlights advances in understanding of patients' perceptions of total joint replacement. Research shows that patients' willingness to consider total joint replacement varies by sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status as a result of systematic differences in knowledge and beliefs about the procedure. Individuals with low socioeconomic status and minorities view the procedure less favorably than their wealthier, white counterparts, possibly partly explaining disparity in rates of use of the procedure among these groups. Among those undergoing total joint replacement, up to 30% experience a suboptimal outcome or are dissatisfied with results. Early work suggests that patients' expectations and self-efficacy are important potential predictors of postoperative outcome. Patient information needs regarding total joint replacement vary significantly and possibly systematically by sex and race/ethnicity. Available information materials may not address the concerns of many individuals contemplating the procedure, posing a potential barrier to surgery. Targeted culturally sensitive knowledge dissemination strategies are needed to improve the knowledge and beliefs of people with hip/knee arthritis about total joint replacement.
Article
Satisfaction with the outcome of total knee arthroplasty is highly variable, with a small but significant percentage of patients reporting dissatisfaction with the procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine which factors contribute to patient satisfaction with total knee replacement (TKR), and their relative importance. At a minimum of 1 year post unilateral primary TKR, 253 patients completed a self-administered, validated "Knee Function Questionnaire," which examined each patient's participation in a broad range of activities involving the knee, their level of satisfaction, and the extent to which TKR had fulfilled their expectations. The association between function, expectation and satisfaction was examined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Seventy-five percent of patients were either "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their knee replacement, while 14% were "dissatisfied" or "very dissatisfied." Satisfaction correlated significantly (p < 0.001) with age less than 60, absence of residual symptoms, fulfillment of expectations, and absence of functional impairment. Satisfaction with TKR is primarily determined by patients' expectations, and not their absolute level of function. Real improvements in the outcome of TKA must address prevention of residual pain, stiffness and swelling, and each patient's preoperative concept of the likely outcome of these procedures.
Charlson ME (1997) Patients’ expectations and satisfaction with total hip arthroplasty
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New total knee arthroplasty designs: do young patients notice?
  • R M Nunley
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Validity and reliability of the German Version of the HSS expectation questionnaire on hip joint replacement
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Balck F, Kirschner S, Jeszenszky C, Lippmann M, Gunther KP (2016) Validity and reliability of the German Version of the HSS expectation questionnaire on hip joint replacement. Z Orthop Unfall 154:606-611
Patients are more satisfied than they expected after joint arthroplasty
  • R Brokelman
  • L C Van
  • Van Sj
  • K A Van
  • R Veth
Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hip, Knee and Shoulder Arthroplasty
Australian Orthopaedic Association (2016) Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hip, Knee and Shoulder Arthroplasty. Annual Report 2016. Adelaide:AOA