Conference Paper

Political Affiliation and Rooftop Solar Adoption in New York and Texas

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... To measure the global and local spatial autocorrelation of ZIP code level solar panel adoption in the LVV, a dataset was acquired from Google's Project Sunroof (see https://sunroof.withgoogle.com/). Multiple studies have leveraged this database to analyze the solar PV adoption phenomenon (Castellanos et al., 2017;Gagnon et al., 2018;Sunter et al., 2018Sunter et al., , 2019. Project Sunroof leverages spatial data from Google Maps and various datasets to provide consumers with solar panel information. ...
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