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My Story Map: review of literature

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Abstract

The study lays the foundation for the ensuing development work of the My Story Map project. It sums up the results of national and transnational desk-based research activities. Early School Leavers are a non-homogeneous group. The youngsters with difficulties at school are mainly studying in a vocational high school rather than secondary schools. The main causes of dropping out are: i) the school environment, ii) pupil-related such as low levels of performance and family-related like single parenthood. The state of the art focuses on three key areas, firstly the current situation regarding prevention of, intervention against, and compensation of early leavers from education and training in the countries participating in the project (AT, BE, FR, SI, UK, IT) and in other European countries and at European level. Secondly, the research examines some solutions and progress made within the strategic framework Education and Training 2020 and synthesises the present state of research on the potential for story-telling and digital story mapping to engage young people at risk (Marta, 2015). Finally, the report explores policies at different scales, strategies for engagement, the reported use of tools, pedagogical approaches, success stories and concludes with recommendations that influence the rest of the My Story Map project.
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