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Rohingya mass exodus: Who should pay compensation and how much?

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Rohingya people have faced recurring military crackdowns and fled from Myanmar in significant numbers in 1978, 1992, 2012, 2015 2016 and 2017. These recurring military crackdowns have devastated Rohingya peoples’ lives and rendered them increasingly marginalised and made most of them destitute. In August 2017 the Myanmar army burned approximately 300 Rohingya villages. It is estimated that during the August 2017 military crackdown 25,000 Rohingya were murdered, 28,000 raped, 43,000 received gunshot wounds, and 116,000 beaten. As a result, at least 800,000 Rohingya fled from Myanmar and took refuge in Bangladesh, joining those who had fled earlier. At the time of writing, Rohingya in Bangladesh are estimated to number 1.1million, but this research focuses on data gathered in January 2018 and a refugee population of 800,000. This study was conducted by a research consortium consisting of academics and practitioners from Australia, Canada and several international institutional partners from Australia, Bangladesh, Canada and the Philippines. The research team visited the Rohingya refugee camps on several occasions and conducted structured interviews with 3,300 Rohingya household heads of families in total comprising 16,314 members. In-depth semi-structured questionnaires and qualitative interviews were utilised in collecting various socio-economic data, including livelihood activities, household income, expenses, savings, asset holdings, condition of respondents’ houses, etc. in Myanmar prior to fleeing. In this paper, researchers develop a compensation model estimated using economic and demographic data collected from respondents. The paper goes beyond investigating the cost of displacement of Rohingya people to develop an estimate of the compensation that would be required for repatriation, resettlement and rehabilitation of Rohingya people to restore their original state of economic life in Myanmar. Keywords: "Rohingya", "Myanmar", "Burma", Arakan", "Criminal Justice", "corrections and rehabilitation", "crime and psychology", "forensic science", "capital punishment", "bio-social/biology", "Environment", “anthropology”, "migration", "sociology", "geography", "Geo-politics", "international relations", "Sustainable development", "genocide", "atrocity", "crime", "ethnic cleansing ", "murder", "Rape", "Bangladesh", "Cox's Bazar", "UNCHR", "united nations", "humanitarian", "Community", "minority", "Law", "Development Studies", "Communication", "Army", "South East Asia", "Regional Development", "Humanity", "disaster", "Protection", "Forest", "destruction", "rehabilitation", "resettlement", "repatriation", #compensation Read more here: catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/7857480
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