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Manual for Samarbejdende familieterapi

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Abstract

Denne bog kan læses som en alternativ lærebog i narrativ psykiatrisk familieterapi. Den fokuserer ikke kun på den del mange vil kalde den manualiserede del af en behandling, men også på de etiske aspekter og de organisatoriske dele af et familieterapeutisk arbejde og den beskriver også det forskningsprojekt, som den manualiserede behandling er blevet udarbejdet på baggrund af. Den forklarer ikke alle dele af teorien, som man kan finde i andre bøger om specielt narrativ terapi, men fokuserer på de dele, vi anvender specielt til vores formål. Vi kalder vores behandling Samarbejdende Familieterapi for at sætte fokus på den tilgang, man må have som behandler, når man møder familier, der er belastet af psykiske lidelser: • At terapi er mest effektiv, hvis man møder familier med respekt og i en samarbejdende ånd. At dette i sig selv er terapeutisk. • At ingen terapi kan være adskilt fra alle de andre fora en familie kommer i som for eksempel skole, socialforvaltning osv. Og at behandlerne derfor skal samarbejde med disse. • At terapi ikke kun er de samtaler, vi kan have på et kontor, men også er de skriftlige dokumenter, vi udveksler med familien, og med familiens samarbejdspartnere i kommune med mere.
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