Article

Passengers’ evacuation from a fire train in railway tunnel

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Abstract

To acquire the evacuation time and average evacuation velocity of young adults under a train fire situation in railway tunnel, experiments and numerical simulations were conducted. According to the results, if the fire train continues running, the number of passengers in adjacent compartment affects the evacuation procedure in fire compartment greatly. The average velocity decreases by 45.7% when the adjacent compartment is 40% overloaded. If the fire train stops immediately, evacuation in the fire compartment is influenced greatly by the number and location of opened train doors. The average evacuation velocity decreases by 21.6% when two doors are opened on one side other than on two sides. Also, it is advisable to set the evacuation velocities of young adult male and female to be 1.2 m/s and 1.0 m/s respectively under train fire situation in railway tunnel. The results have important implications for rail safety.

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